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Author Topic: Health and Religion  (Read 192940 times)
CoinCube
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October 13, 2019, 07:40:07 AM
 #2601


The happiest wives in US are religious conservatives
https://www.lifesitenews.com/blogs/leftists-outraged-over-evidence-that-happiest-wives-in-us-are-religious-conservatives
Quote from: Jonathon Van Maren
October 8, 2019 (LifeSiteNews) – One of the most consistently interesting things about our cultural debates surrounding marriage and sexuality is the resistance that many of those on the secular side of the spectrum exhibit towards the slowly growing mountain of evidence supporting the fact that our Judeo-Christian values are often essential to both social stability as well as personal happiness. While the soft-core porn mags sold at supermarket checkouts urge young men and women to engage in sizzling sexual experiments and public sex education teaches children to believe that anything is on the table, social studies tell us that we are robbing them of the future many of them desire—or will desire in the future.

Let’s take a look at just two recent reports. The New York Times, as The Blaze noted at the time, “caused an avalanche of anger” after they published a report by the Institute for Family Studies and the Wheatley Institution finding that “the happiest of all American wives consider themselves religious conservatives.” 

A tweet sent out by New York Times Opinion was apparently particularly galling: “It turns out that the happiest of all wives in America are religious conservatives, followed by their religious progressive counterparts.”

In the report, researchers detailed the fact that women who report having “above-average satisfaction with their marriages” are often both religious and conservative, and the New York Times op-ed on the findings noted that “Fully 73 percent of wives who hold conservative gender values and attend religious services regularly with their husbands have high-quality marriages. When it comes to relationship quality, there is a J-curve in women’s marital happiness, with women on the left and the right enjoying higher quality marriages than those in the middle—but especially wives on the right.”

This should not be particularly surprising. Those who believe that marriage is a sacred institution constituting a life-long, monogamous commitment to one person are, generally (and statistically) speaking, going to enter marriage with a radically different perspective than those who believe the whole thing can be called off with less difficulty than a cell phone contract. 

If, as many religious people believe, marriage is a covenant rather than a contract, this has obvious implications for both entering marriage and exiting one. If divorce is not seen as the exercise of the opt-out clause in a civil arrangement but rather, as Peter Kreeft once put it, “the murder of the one flesh” union, then the severing of the marital bond is obviously far more significant than our current social norms would have us believe.

The same is true for sexual activity prior to marriage. I recall one older fellow I worked with years ago asking me, with disbelief, how I could conceive of entering a marriage without first sleeping with my partner. After all, he explained, you wouldn’t purchase a car without test-driving it first. Side-stepping the offensiveness of his comparison of a spouse to a car and marriage to the purchase of one (the unspoken and perhaps unrecognized implication that a “newer model” might be preferable down the road did not come up), the evidence simply does not bear out the idea that multiple sexual partners prior to marriage is beneficial to committing to one person for a lifetime. In fact, it is rather bewildering that so many seem to believe that promiscuity is good practice for monogamy.

This, too, was once again proven by sociologist Nicholas Wolfinger of the University of Utah over at the Institute for Family Studies. He found, unsurprisingly, that Americans who had only ever slept with their spouses were by far the most likely to report that their marriage was “very happy.” Conversely, women who had between six and ten sexual partners in their lives reported the lowest odds of marital happiness (thirteen percentage points lower than women who had only reported one partner.) The same proved true for men, who also reported lower marital satisfaction after one partner, although their satisfaction did not dip as low as it does for women.

According to The Atlantic’s report on the study:

“Contrary to conventional wisdom, when it comes to sex, less experience is better, at least for the marriage,” said W. Bradford Wilcox, a sociologist and senior fellow at the Institute for Family Studies. In an earlier analysis, Wolfinger found that women with zero or one previous sex partners before marriage were also least likely to divorce, while those with 10 or more were most likely. These divorce-proof brides are an exclusive crew: By the 2010s, he writes, just 5 percent of new brides were virgins. And just 6 percent of their marriages dissolved within five years, compared with 20 percent for most people.

Other studies’ findings have also supported the surprising durability of marriages between people who have only ever had sex with one another. In this latest study, women who have had one partner instead of two are about 5 percentage points happier in their marriages, about on a par, Wolfinger says, with the boost that possessing a four-year degree, attending religious services, or having an income over $78,000 a year has for a happy marriage. (In his analysis, he controlled for education, income, and age at marriage.)

If our governments were genuinely interested in promoting personal happiness and social stability, public sex education would be conveying the findings of these reports and many, many others that concur. 

The ideologues running our education system are not committed to doing what is best for those in their charge, but instead promoting their own set of beliefs—beliefs, it must be pointed out, that have led to a polarized culture with rates of family breakdown unheard of in human history outside of war or natural disaster. Many young people in our society today are searching for answers, and those answers will not be found in what the secular establishment is offering. They can be found in the beautiful traditions we cast aside.

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October 13, 2019, 05:03:36 PM
 #2602


The happiest wives in US are religious conservatives
https://www.lifesitenews.com/blogs/leftists-outraged-over-evidence-that-happiest-wives-in-us-are-religious-conservatives
Quote from: Jonathon Van Maren
October 8, 2019 (LifeSiteNews) – One of the most consistently interesting things about our cultural debates surrounding marriage and sexuality is the resistance that many of those on the secular side of the spectrum exhibit towards the slowly growing mountain of evidence supporting the fact that our Judeo-Christian values are often essential to both social stability as well as personal happiness. While the soft-core porn mags sold at supermarket checkouts urge young men and women to engage in sizzling sexual experiments and public sex education teaches children to believe that anything is on the table, social studies tell us that we are robbing them of the future many of them desire—or will desire in the future.

Let’s take a look at just two recent reports. The New York Times, as The Blaze noted at the time, “caused an avalanche of anger” after they published a report by the Institute for Family Studies and the Wheatley Institution finding that “the happiest of all American wives consider themselves religious conservatives.” 

A tweet sent out by New York Times Opinion was apparently particularly galling: “It turns out that the happiest of all wives in America are religious conservatives, followed by their religious progressive counterparts.”

In the report, researchers detailed the fact that women who report having “above-average satisfaction with their marriages” are often both religious and conservative, and the New York Times op-ed on the findings noted that “Fully 73 percent of wives who hold conservative gender values and attend religious services regularly with their husbands have high-quality marriages. When it comes to relationship quality, there is a J-curve in women’s marital happiness, with women on the left and the right enjoying higher quality marriages than those in the middle—but especially wives on the right.”

This should not be particularly surprising. Those who believe that marriage is a sacred institution constituting a life-long, monogamous commitment to one person are, generally (and statistically) speaking, going to enter marriage with a radically different perspective than those who believe the whole thing can be called off with less difficulty than a cell phone contract. 

If, as many religious people believe, marriage is a covenant rather than a contract, this has obvious implications for both entering marriage and exiting one. If divorce is not seen as the exercise of the opt-out clause in a civil arrangement but rather, as Peter Kreeft once put it, “the murder of the one flesh” union, then the severing of the marital bond is obviously far more significant than our current social norms would have us believe.

The same is true for sexual activity prior to marriage. I recall one older fellow I worked with years ago asking me, with disbelief, how I could conceive of entering a marriage without first sleeping with my partner. After all, he explained, you wouldn’t purchase a car without test-driving it first. Side-stepping the offensiveness of his comparison of a spouse to a car and marriage to the purchase of one (the unspoken and perhaps unrecognized implication that a “newer model” might be preferable down the road did not come up), the evidence simply does not bear out the idea that multiple sexual partners prior to marriage is beneficial to committing to one person for a lifetime. In fact, it is rather bewildering that so many seem to believe that promiscuity is good practice for monogamy.

This, too, was once again proven by sociologist Nicholas Wolfinger of the University of Utah over at the Institute for Family Studies. He found, unsurprisingly, that Americans who had only ever slept with their spouses were by far the most likely to report that their marriage was “very happy.” Conversely, women who had between six and ten sexual partners in their lives reported the lowest odds of marital happiness (thirteen percentage points lower than women who had only reported one partner.) The same proved true for men, who also reported lower marital satisfaction after one partner, although their satisfaction did not dip as low as it does for women.

According to The Atlantic’s report on the study:

“Contrary to conventional wisdom, when it comes to sex, less experience is better, at least for the marriage,” said W. Bradford Wilcox, a sociologist and senior fellow at the Institute for Family Studies. In an earlier analysis, Wolfinger found that women with zero or one previous sex partners before marriage were also least likely to divorce, while those with 10 or more were most likely. These divorce-proof brides are an exclusive crew: By the 2010s, he writes, just 5 percent of new brides were virgins. And just 6 percent of their marriages dissolved within five years, compared with 20 percent for most people.

Other studies’ findings have also supported the surprising durability of marriages between people who have only ever had sex with one another. In this latest study, women who have had one partner instead of two are about 5 percentage points happier in their marriages, about on a par, Wolfinger says, with the boost that possessing a four-year degree, attending religious services, or having an income over $78,000 a year has for a happy marriage. (In his analysis, he controlled for education, income, and age at marriage.)

If our governments were genuinely interested in promoting personal happiness and social stability, public sex education would be conveying the findings of these reports and many, many others that concur. 

The ideologues running our education system are not committed to doing what is best for those in their charge, but instead promoting their own set of beliefs—beliefs, it must be pointed out, that have led to a polarized culture with rates of family breakdown unheard of in human history outside of war or natural disaster. Many young people in our society today are searching for answers, and those answers will not be found in what the secular establishment is offering. They can be found in the beautiful traditions we cast aside.

Or, happiness is determined solely by the positive cultural interactions in the society you happen to live.  Not the superstition one adheres to.

Rape, abuse, murder, corporal punishment is prevalent in all cultures, regardless of the details of the corresponding religious cult.  I would venture to say it is more prevalent in societies where such incivilities are sanctioned by the divine powers.

Maren's sententious rhetoric is not only void of any substance, it completely ignores non-Christian, yet happy Americans.

Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful.
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October 13, 2019, 07:46:18 PM
Last edit: October 14, 2019, 01:20:07 AM by CoinCube
 #2603

Or, happiness is determined solely by the positive cultural interactions in the society you happen to live.  Not the superstition one adheres to.

Rape, abuse, murder, corporal punishment is prevalent in all cultures, regardless of the details of the corresponding religious cult.  I would venture to say it is more prevalent in societies where such incivilities are sanctioned by the divine powers.

Maren's sententious rhetoric is not only void of any substance, it completely ignores non-Christian, yet happy Americans.

Yes rape, abuse, murder, is prevalent in all cultures as are many other horrors great and small. Evil is an inherent part of biological humanity. We are wolves by nature. Some wolves are restrained by physical cages, others by fear of cages and punishment. The best of us try and to some degree succeed in putting the wolf in us to sleep and restrain ourselves allowing that which is best to emerge. In all cases, however, the wolf is never gone deep down it remains.

Yes, but mark, what is true one day is not false another; "the carnal mind is enmity against God" at all times. The wolf may sleep, but it is a wolf still. The snake with its azure hues, may slumber amid the flowers, and the child may stroke its slimy back, but it is a serpent still; it does not change its nature, though it is dormant. The sea is the house of storms, even when it is glassy as a lake; the thunder is still the mighty rolling thunder, when it is so much aloft that we hear it not. And the heart, when we perceive not its ebullitions, when it belches not forth its lava, and sendeth not forth the hot stones of its corruption, is still the same dread volcano. At all times, at all hours, at every moment.” - REV. C. H. Spurgeon

Happiness is in part determined by positive cultural interactions. Positive interactions are win-win cooperative ones as opposed to defection which involve some form of force, coercion or exploitation. If you happen to live in an environment full of kind people and positive cultural interactions you have a reasonable chance of being happy. You appear to assume that the religion one adheres to does not materially impact the quality and quantity of one’s cultural interactions. Basically every study shows the opposite that religious observance leads to substantial improvements in well-being. Secular alternatives you mentioned like joining a cooking class are not genuine alternatives. They may facilitate socialization but they do nothing to address the problem of defection.

See: Multiverse Wide Cooperation

Religion ultimately is the framework of beliefs, views, and values used to structure one’s life. Some people join existing formal religions. Many people just follow their biological impulses any given moment.  Other people develop their own esoteric views or attach their meaning to political movements or cults. Everyone, is religious not everyone understands their religion.

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October 17, 2019, 12:55:54 PM
Last edit: October 19, 2019, 03:55:01 PM by CoinCube
 #2604


Leftists attack Attorney General Barr for denouncing ‘militant secularists’ in Notre Dame speech

https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/leftists-attack-attorney-general-barr-for-denouncing-militant-secularists-in-notre-dame-speech
Quote from: Calvin Freiburger
October 16, 2019 (LifeSiteNews) – U.S. Attorney General William Barr delivered forceful remarks at the University of Notre Dame on Friday regarding the defense of religious liberty against “militant secularists,” for which a chorus of left-wing media voices have denounced him.

“From the Founding Era onward, there was strong consensus about the centrality of religious liberty in the United States,” Barr said in his speech. “The imperative of protecting religious freedom was not just a nod in the direction of piety. It reflects the Framers’ belief that religion was indispensable to sustaining our free system of government.”

“By and large, the Founding generation’s view of human nature was drawn from the Classical Christian tradition,” he explained. “These practical Statesmen understood that individuals, while having the potential for great good, also had the capacity for great evil. Men are subject to powerful passions and appetites, and, if unrestrained, are capable of ruthlessly riding roughshod over their neighbors and the community at large.”

“No society can exist without some means for restraining individual rapacity,” Barr continued, with the Founders’ chosen means being a “social order” whose values “flow from a transcendent Supreme Being,” rather than the “coercive power of government.”

He argued that those values helped America to become an unparalleled force for liberty and human progress, but are now at risk from the “steady erosion of our traditional Judeo-Christian moral system and a comprehensive effort to drive it from the public square” by “militant secularists.”

“By any honest assessment, the consequences of this moral upheaval have been grim,” Barr lamented. “Virtually every measure of social pathology” – out-of-wedlock births, substance abuse, depression and mental illness, suicide, and more – “continues to gain ground.”
The secularization of America “is not decay; it is organized destruction,” Barr charged. “Secularists, and their allies among the ‘progressives,’ have marshalled all the force of mass communications, popular culture, the entertainment industry, and academia in an unremitting assault on religion and traditional values. These instruments are used not only to affirmatively promote secular orthodoxy, but also drown out and silence opposing voices, and to attack viciously and hold up to ridicule any dissenters.”

This, in turn, has transformed the state from safeguarding liberty to “mitigate the social costs of personal misconduct and irresponsibility,” he said. “So the reaction to growing illegitimacy is not sexual responsibility, but abortion. The reaction to drug addiction is safe injection sites. The solution to the breakdown of the family is for the State to set itself up as the ersatz husband for single mothers and the ersatz father to their children.”

Despite this grim picture, Barr told the audience there is “hope for moral renewal in our country,” but it will take challenging work, and concerned Americans “cannot sit back and just hope the pendulum is going to swing back toward sanity.”
...

William Barr Speech
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=cySSyFSaGzg

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October 18, 2019, 10:40:43 AM
 #2605

I have recently adopted a beliefs and psychology from the Hindu faith. It has helped me a great deal understand why bad things happen to good people. The law of karma has given me see a different perspective on life. I also think traditional therapy like CBT and other western mental health techniques can also make people much happier. I was told I would face a 6 month wait on the Irish national health service to see a counsellor but ended up using an online therapist with this company: https://anamcaratherapy.com/. it is sad to have to pay privately for good mental health care, the government should do better.
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October 18, 2019, 05:26:22 PM
 #2606

Pew: U.S. Christian Population in Freefall, 12% Drop in Ten Years
https://www.breitbart.com/faith/2019/10/18/pew-u-s-christian-population-in-freefall-12-drop-in-ten-years/
Quote from: Thomas D. Williams
Christianity in the United States is declining at an unprecedented rate, a new study by the Pew Research Council revealed Thursday, and the percentage of Christians in the country has hit an all-time low.

In just ten years the percentage of U.S. adults that identify as Christians dropped by a remarkable 12 percent, Pew found, from to 77 percent to just 65 percent, the lowest point in the nation’s 243-year history.

Protestantism and Catholicism have both suffered significant losses, with the number of Protestants dropping from 51 percent in 2009 to just 43 percent today, while the number of Catholics has fallen from nearly a quarter of the population (23 percent) to just one-in-five (20 percent) since 2009.

During the same period, the number of religious “nones” — those who self-identify as atheist, agnostic, or “nothing in particular” — has shot up by a stunning 17 percent and this group now makes up more than a quarter of the population (26 percent).

The number of atheists in the country has doubled since 2009, from just 2 percent of the population to the current 4 percent. Agnostics now make up 5 percent of the adult population, up from just 3 percent in 2009, while those who describe their religion as “nothing in particular” has leapt from 12 percent to 17 percent in this ten-year period.

In absolute terms, the number of religiously unaffiliated adults in the U.S. has grown by almost 30 million since 2009.

The increase of the religiously unaffiliated has been most acute among young adults, resulting in a markedly less religious generation. Fewer than half of Millennials (49 percent) describe themselves as Christians, while four-in-ten identify as religious “nones” and another ten percent identify with non-Christian faiths.

Along with the trend toward religious disaffiliation, a similar trend away from religious practice has also emerged over the past decade, Pew found. The number of regular worship attenders (who say they attend religious services at least once or twice a month) dropped by 7 percentage points since 2009, offset by a comparable rise in the number who now say they attend religious services less often (if at all).

Whereas in 2009 regular worship attenders outnumbered those who attend services only occasionally (or not at all) by a margin of 52 percent to 47 percent, today those figures are reversed, Pew discovered. Now a majority of Americans say they attend religious services a few times a year or less (54 percent) while 45 percent say they attend at least once a month.

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October 19, 2019, 12:04:37 PM
 #2607

I have recently adopted a beliefs and psychology from the Hindu faith. It has helped me a great deal understand why bad things happen to good people. The law of karma has given me see a different perspective on life. I also think traditional therapy like CBT and other western mental health techniques can also make people much happier. I was told I would face a 6 month wait on the Irish national health service to see a counsellor but ended up using an online therapist with this company: https://anamcaratherapy.com/. it is sad to have to pay privately for good mental health care, the government should do better.

As an agnostic I would say that it is easier for me to accept things as they are rather than trying to find a philosophical reason behind every cause. But when I am depressed I search for the reason and actually I believe that things might have a cause because nothing can be in action without a cause. The the philosophy of karma is actually indeed very soothing towards stress and it feels like every pain is a way to wipe the past sins and to be free from a stain in the loop of space time.

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October 19, 2019, 02:32:42 PM
 #2608

I have recently adopted a beliefs and psychology from the Hindu faith. It has helped me a great deal understand why bad things happen to good people. The law of karma has given me see a different perspective on life. I also think traditional therapy like CBT and other western mental health techniques can also make people much happier. I was told I would face a 6 month wait on the Irish national health service to see a counsellor but ended up using an online therapist with this company: https://anamcaratherapy.com/. it is sad to have to pay privately for good mental health care, the government should do better.

As an agnostic I would say that it is easier for me to accept things as they are rather than trying to find a philosophical reason behind every cause. But when I am depressed I search for the reason and actually I believe that things might have a cause because nothing can be in action without a cause. The the philosophy of karma is actually indeed very soothing towards stress and it feels like every pain is a way to wipe the past sins and to be free from a stain in the loop of space time.

An important note here is this. Thinking and understanding about things doesn't make them happen. The construct of the universe and the physical laws thereof, make even deep thinking something that doesn't easily cause changes in the physical universe. The changes only come about when the thinking is dedicated thinking, and the thinker gets to work.

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October 19, 2019, 08:52:17 PM
 #2609

Happy Sabbath Everyone

Go Light Your World - Kathy Troccoli
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2igaRoH2ZnY

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October 19, 2019, 09:02:42 PM
 #2610

I have recently adopted a beliefs and psychology from the Hindu faith. It has helped me a great deal understand why bad things happen to good people. The law of karma has given me see a different perspective on life. I also think traditional therapy like CBT and other western mental health techniques can also make people much happier. I was told I would face a 6 month wait on the Irish national health service to see a counsellor but ended up using an online therapist with this company: https://anamcaratherapy.com/. it is sad to have to pay privately for good mental health care, the government should do better.

As an agnostic I would say that it is easier for me to accept things as they are rather than trying to find a philosophical reason behind every cause. But when I am depressed I search for the reason and actually I believe that things might have a cause because nothing can be in action without a cause. The the philosophy of karma is actually indeed very soothing towards stress and it feels like every pain is a way to wipe the past sins and to be free from a stain in the loop of space time.

''because nothing can be in action without a cause'' No one knows this and there are no experiments possible to prove it right now. Physicists, for instance, do think true randomness exists as predicting when a radioactive atom will radioact is impossible. Perhaps because we don't know how or because true randomness exists.
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October 20, 2019, 12:22:06 AM
 #2611

I have recently adopted a beliefs and psychology from the Hindu faith. It has helped me a great deal understand why bad things happen to good people. The law of karma has given me see a different perspective on life. I also think traditional therapy like CBT and other western mental health techniques can also make people much happier. I was told I would face a 6 month wait on the Irish national health service to see a counsellor but ended up using an online therapist with this company: https://anamcaratherapy.com/. it is sad to have to pay privately for good mental health care, the government should do better.

As an agnostic I would say that it is easier for me to accept things as they are rather than trying to find a philosophical reason behind every cause. But when I am depressed I search for the reason and actually I believe that things might have a cause because nothing can be in action without a cause. The the philosophy of karma is actually indeed very soothing towards stress and it feels like every pain is a way to wipe the past sins and to be free from a stain in the loop of space time.

''because nothing can be in action without a cause'' No one knows this and there are no experiments possible to prove it right now. Physicists, for instance, do think true randomness exists as predicting when a radioactive atom will radioact is impossible. Perhaps because we don't know how or because true randomness exists.

All that is, is scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity. You don't need radiation to think that pure random might exist. All you need is to watch the way a leaf blows in the breeze on a warm summer day. You have no idea where the molecules of air that hit the leaf are coming from, or where they are going. It seems like pure random.

The difference between the physics of the twisting, blown leaf, and atomic radiation are, we understand the principles of the physics of the leaf a whole lot more than we understand nuclear physics.

Science probably will never understand the physics of the radioactive atom until they understand that the nothingness of empty space is filled with a material that is entirely different than matter... matter which is essentially energy with complex activities going on between the parts, all held in place by the "material" of empty space.

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October 20, 2019, 10:28:30 AM
 #2612

I have recently adopted a beliefs and psychology from the Hindu faith. It has helped me a great deal understand why bad things happen to good people. The law of karma has given me see a different perspective on life. I also think traditional therapy like CBT and other western mental health techniques can also make people much happier. I was told I would face a 6 month wait on the Irish national health service to see a counsellor but ended up using an online therapist with this company: https://anamcaratherapy.com/. it is sad to have to pay privately for good mental health care, the government should do better.

As an agnostic I would say that it is easier for me to accept things as they are rather than trying to find a philosophical reason behind every cause. But when I am depressed I search for the reason and actually I believe that things might have a cause because nothing can be in action without a cause. The the philosophy of karma is actually indeed very soothing towards stress and it feels like every pain is a way to wipe the past sins and to be free from a stain in the loop of space time.

''because nothing can be in action without a cause'' No one knows this and there are no experiments possible to prove it right now. Physicists, for instance, do think true randomness exists as predicting when a radioactive atom will radioact is impossible. Perhaps because we don't know how or because true randomness exists.

All that is, is scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity. You don't need radiation to think that pure random might exist. All you need is to watch the way a leaf blows in the breeze on a warm summer day. You have no idea where the molecules of air that hit the leaf are coming from, or where they are going. It seems like pure random.

The difference between the physics of the twisting, blown leaf, and atomic radiation are, we understand the principles of the physics of the leaf a whole lot more than we understand nuclear physics.

Science probably will never understand the physics of the radioactive atom until they understand that the nothingness of empty space is filled with a material that is entirely different than matter... matter which is essentially energy with complex activities going on between the parts, all held in place by the "material" of empty space.

Cool

''All that is, is scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity.'' That's a baseless assertion, unfortunately, you cannot prove that.
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October 20, 2019, 12:03:27 PM
 #2613

I have recently adopted a beliefs and psychology from the Hindu faith. It has helped me a great deal understand why bad things happen to good people. The law of karma has given me see a different perspective on life. I also think traditional therapy like CBT and other western mental health techniques can also make people much happier. I was told I would face a 6 month wait on the Irish national health service to see a counsellor but ended up using an online therapist with this company: https://anamcaratherapy.com/. it is sad to have to pay privately for good mental health care, the government should do better.

As an agnostic I would say that it is easier for me to accept things as they are rather than trying to find a philosophical reason behind every cause. But when I am depressed I search for the reason and actually I believe that things might have a cause because nothing can be in action without a cause. The the philosophy of karma is actually indeed very soothing towards stress and it feels like every pain is a way to wipe the past sins and to be free from a stain in the loop of space time.

''because nothing can be in action without a cause'' No one knows this and there are no experiments possible to prove it right now. Physicists, for instance, do think true randomness exists as predicting when a radioactive atom will radioact is impossible. Perhaps because we don't know how or because true randomness exists.

All that is, is scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity. You don't need radiation to think that pure random might exist. All you need is to watch the way a leaf blows in the breeze on a warm summer day. You have no idea where the molecules of air that hit the leaf are coming from, or where they are going. It seems like pure random.

The difference between the physics of the twisting, blown leaf, and atomic radiation are, we understand the principles of the physics of the leaf a whole lot more than we understand nuclear physics.

Science probably will never understand the physics of the radioactive atom until they understand that the nothingness of empty space is filled with a material that is entirely different than matter... matter which is essentially energy with complex activities going on between the parts, all held in place by the "material" of empty space.

Cool

At the macro level universe appears to be governed by the cause and effect.

However, at a very fundamental level, it is non-deterministic.  The underlying quantum mechanisms might be emergent in nature and non-deterministic.

In other words, stuff happens and no one can predict the outcome.

People are actively working on uncovering that veil.  What happens below Planck's time and length?  How the laws of nature, gravity came about?  What and how many other dimensions are out there?  What and how many other universes are out there?  What is the nature of the substrate that causes the universes to form?  Right now, it looks like we are stuck on the 4D brane.

Read some more on it, very interesting stuff.  It will open your mind.

As for "science probably will never understand the physics", remember what Philipp von Jolly said to Max Plank in 1878: "in this field (Physics), almost everything is already discovered, and all that remains is to fill a few unimportant holes."   Maybe another Plank or Einstein has not been born yet or maybe he or she is playing is some sandbox right now.  Never say never.

It does not matter what people believe, what Thor, Zeus, Jesus, Yahweh, and Allah (aka people) want. 

Science will progress.  Religion will not.

Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful.
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October 20, 2019, 01:38:19 PM
 #2614


All that is, is scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity. You don't need radiation to think that pure random might exist. All you need is to watch the way a leaf blows in the breeze on a warm summer day. You have no idea where the molecules of air that hit the leaf are coming from, or where they are going. It seems like pure random.

The difference between the physics of the twisting, blown leaf, and atomic radiation are, we understand the principles of the physics of the leaf a whole lot more than we understand nuclear physics.

Science probably will never understand the physics of the radioactive atom until they understand that the nothingness of empty space is filled with a material that is entirely different than matter... matter which is essentially energy with complex activities going on between the parts, all held in place by the "material" of empty space.

Cool

''All that is, is scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity.'' That's a baseless assertion, unfortunately, you cannot prove that.

You need to keep up with science. All you need to do is Google "refurbishing CERN." Scientists themselves are showing you that they don't know enough about radioactivity. Nobody has to prove it to know it.

Cool

Don't be afraid to donate Bitcoin >>> 1JDJotyxZLFF8akGCxHeqMkD4YrrTmEAwz !
Astargath
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October 20, 2019, 04:03:15 PM
 #2615


All that is, is scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity. You don't need radiation to think that pure random might exist. All you need is to watch the way a leaf blows in the breeze on a warm summer day. You have no idea where the molecules of air that hit the leaf are coming from, or where they are going. It seems like pure random.

The difference between the physics of the twisting, blown leaf, and atomic radiation are, we understand the principles of the physics of the leaf a whole lot more than we understand nuclear physics.

Science probably will never understand the physics of the radioactive atom until they understand that the nothingness of empty space is filled with a material that is entirely different than matter... matter which is essentially energy with complex activities going on between the parts, all held in place by the "material" of empty space.

Cool

''All that is, is scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity.'' That's a baseless assertion, unfortunately, you cannot prove that.

You need to keep up with science. All you need to do is Google "refurbishing CERN." Scientists themselves are showing you that they don't know enough about radioactivity. Nobody has to prove it to know it.

Cool

Fallacy, scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity doesn't automatically mean, true randomness doesn't exist. As far as we can tell, it does, right now.
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October 20, 2019, 07:13:24 PM
Last edit: October 20, 2019, 07:46:19 PM by CoinCube
 #2616

Fallacy, scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity doesn't automatically mean, true randomness doesn't exist. As far as we can tell, it does, right now.

It means that science cannot currently or likely ever answer the question. Whether you choose to believe randomness exists or not is ultimately not a scientific question.

Is the universe a perfect order of God or chaos?

The leaf floating in the wind was a good example. We now more or less understand the forces involved and if we really wanted to could at least in theory someday develop a computer program coupled with a way of measuring all of the wind currents in a given area and understand exactly how and why the leaf was moving the way it was maybe even predict its future movement in advance.

We cannot currently predict the exact time a particular radioactive atom will rip itself apart. Is this an example like the leaf where improved understandings of the motions of protons and neutrons and their interactions with surrounding fields and other atoms would change things or is it forever outside of our knowledge and hence "random"?

You can argue it either way but it's not a scientific argument.

Science will progress.  Religion will not.

Science will march forward but what it will march into will be determined by the religion of the scientists and society at large. Science is just accumulated practical experience and knowledge. Ultimately it is power, power over ourselves, our fellow man, and the natural world.

It is the way we use and deploy that power which will determine if we progress into a better future or build something nightmarish.

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October 20, 2019, 09:03:54 PM
 #2617


All that is, is scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity. You don't need radiation to think that pure random might exist. All you need is to watch the way a leaf blows in the breeze on a warm summer day. You have no idea where the molecules of air that hit the leaf are coming from, or where they are going. It seems like pure random.

The difference between the physics of the twisting, blown leaf, and atomic radiation are, we understand the principles of the physics of the leaf a whole lot more than we understand nuclear physics.

Science probably will never understand the physics of the radioactive atom until they understand that the nothingness of empty space is filled with a material that is entirely different than matter... matter which is essentially energy with complex activities going on between the parts, all held in place by the "material" of empty space.

Cool

''All that is, is scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity.'' That's a baseless assertion, unfortunately, you cannot prove that.

You need to keep up with science. All you need to do is Google "refurbishing CERN." Scientists themselves are showing you that they don't know enough about radioactivity. Nobody has to prove it to know it.

Cool

Fallacy, scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity doesn't automatically mean, true randomness doesn't exist. As far as we can tell, it does, right now.

But you seem to think that not knowing enough about radioactivity means they know everything about radioactivity. Why? Because you are using it as an example that pure random DOES exist.

Cool

Don't be afraid to donate Bitcoin >>> 1JDJotyxZLFF8akGCxHeqMkD4YrrTmEAwz !
af_newbie
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October 20, 2019, 09:49:55 PM
 #2618

Fallacy, scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity doesn't automatically mean, true randomness doesn't exist. As far as we can tell, it does, right now.

It means that science cannot currently or likely ever answer the question. Whether you choose to believe randomness exists or not is ultimately not a scientific question.

Is the universe a perfect order of God or chaos?

The leaf floating in the wind was a good example. We now more or less understand the forces involved and if we really wanted to could at least in theory someday develop a computer program coupled with a way of measuring all of the wind currents in a given area and understand exactly how and why the leaf was moving the way it was maybe even predict its future movement in advance.

We cannot currently predict the exact time a particular radioactive atom will rip itself apart. Is this an example like the leaf where improved understandings of the motions of protons and neutrons and their interactions with surrounding fields and other atoms would change things or is it forever outside of our knowledge and hence "random"?

You can argue it either way but it's not a scientific argument.

Science will progress.  Religion will not.

Science will march forward but what it will march into will be determined by the religion of the scientists and society at large. Science is just accumulated practical experience and knowledge. Ultimately it is power, power over ourselves, our fellow man, and the natural world.

It is the way we use and deploy that power which will determine if we progress into a better future or build something nightmarish.

We will progress despite religion slowing us down.

Religions will be completely obsolete in 100 years, and people who will still suffer from these delusions will be diagnosed and properly treated.

Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful.
Astargath
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October 20, 2019, 10:01:06 PM
 #2619


All that is, is scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity. You don't need radiation to think that pure random might exist. All you need is to watch the way a leaf blows in the breeze on a warm summer day. You have no idea where the molecules of air that hit the leaf are coming from, or where they are going. It seems like pure random.

The difference between the physics of the twisting, blown leaf, and atomic radiation are, we understand the principles of the physics of the leaf a whole lot more than we understand nuclear physics.

Science probably will never understand the physics of the radioactive atom until they understand that the nothingness of empty space is filled with a material that is entirely different than matter... matter which is essentially energy with complex activities going on between the parts, all held in place by the "material" of empty space.

Cool

''All that is, is scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity.'' That's a baseless assertion, unfortunately, you cannot prove that.

You need to keep up with science. All you need to do is Google "refurbishing CERN." Scientists themselves are showing you that they don't know enough about radioactivity. Nobody has to prove it to know it.

Cool

Fallacy, scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity doesn't automatically mean, true randomness doesn't exist. As far as we can tell, it does, right now.

But you seem to think that not knowing enough about radioactivity means they know everything about radioactivity. Why? Because you are using it as an example that pure random DOES exist.

Cool

According to our current understanding, yes, true randomness does exist. If we adopt your philosophy of only trusting things that we know for sure, as in 100% factual, then we wouldn't trust anything.
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October 20, 2019, 10:10:52 PM
 #2620


All that is, is scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity. You don't need radiation to think that pure random might exist. All you need is to watch the way a leaf blows in the breeze on a warm summer day. You have no idea where the molecules of air that hit the leaf are coming from, or where they are going. It seems like pure random.

The difference between the physics of the twisting, blown leaf, and atomic radiation are, we understand the principles of the physics of the leaf a whole lot more than we understand nuclear physics.

Science probably will never understand the physics of the radioactive atom until they understand that the nothingness of empty space is filled with a material that is entirely different than matter... matter which is essentially energy with complex activities going on between the parts, all held in place by the "material" of empty space.

Cool

''All that is, is scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity.'' That's a baseless assertion, unfortunately, you cannot prove that.

You need to keep up with science. All you need to do is Google "refurbishing CERN." Scientists themselves are showing you that they don't know enough about radioactivity. Nobody has to prove it to know it.

Cool

Fallacy, scientists not knowing enough about radioactivity doesn't automatically mean, true randomness doesn't exist. As far as we can tell, it does, right now.

But you seem to think that not knowing enough about radioactivity means they know everything about radioactivity. Why? Because you are using it as an example that pure random DOES exist.

Cool

According to our current understanding, yes, true randomness does exist. If we adopt your philosophy of only trusting things that we know for sure, as in 100% factual, then we wouldn't trust anything.

According to our current understanding, there is doubt. It's a possibility only. But the multitudes of observable C&E facts of billions of people daily, completely destroys the idea of pure random, scientifically. Even science knows that they are at a point of odds where pure random doesn't exist... by the odds.

It's like, "I know I just might win that lottery... because somebody has to win." But in pure random, nobody knows that there will ever be a winner.

Cool

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