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January 27, 2021, 11:54:59 PM *
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Question: 1/31 Closing Price:
<$30,000 - 15 (29.4%)
$30,000-$31,000 - 1 (2%)
$31,000-$32,000 - 2 (3.9%)
$32,000-$33,000 - 8 (15.7%)
$33,000-$34,000 - 3 (5.9%)
$34,000-$35,000 - 0 (0%)
$35,000-$36,000 - 2 (3.9%)
$36,000-$37,000 - 3 (5.9%)
$37,000-$38,000 - 4 (7.8%)
$38,000-$39,000 - 0 (0%)
$39,000-$40,000 - 1 (2%)
>$40,000 - 12 (23.5%)
Total Voters: 51

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Author Topic: Wall Observer BTC/USD - Bitcoin price movement tracking & discussion  (Read 25075852 times)
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El duderino_
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June 27, 2020, 07:55:54 AM
Last edit: June 27, 2020, 08:08:35 AM by El duderino_
Merited by LFC_Bitcoin (2), AlcoHoDL (1)

Debuking these myths:

"Bitcoin is too volatile to serve as a store of value."
"Bitcoin is in a bubble."
"Bitcoin will lose value to ‘forks’ and digital copies."
"Bitcoin is for criminals."
"Bitcoin wastes too much energy."

https://twitter.com/Beetcoin/status/1276774081787035649?s=20
https://ark-invest.com/analyst-research/bitcoin-myths/

^  A good read
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El duderino_
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June 27, 2020, 07:59:19 AM
Merited by xhomerx10 (1)

Starting to like this...
That sentence everyone writes.
FEW UNDERSTAND THIS!



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June 27, 2020, 08:02:42 AM
Merited by El duderino_ (2), JayJuanGee (1)

@binance
Makes you think.
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June 27, 2020, 08:43:39 AM
Merited by JayJuanGee (1)

1/ A thread showing 12 charts that illustrate #Bitcoin investor confidence and increased HODLing behavior.

Spoiler: This is long-term extremely bullish.

(data
@glassnode
)

Let's dig in Rug van hand met omlaag wijzende wijsvinger

https://twitter.com/n3ocortex/status/1276558987643752448?s=20

Follow the link to read more^
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June 27, 2020, 09:18:20 AM
Merited by JayJuanGee (1), LFC_Bitcoin (1)

@binance
Makes you think.



And 0.269% of the global population is the theoretical maximum. I can personally guarantee there won't be 21M people able to own a whole bitcoin.
On the other hand there is probably at least 50% of the world population that will never own $9k either.
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June 27, 2020, 09:20:37 AM
Merited by bitebits (1)

@binance
Makes you think.



And 0.269% of the world's population is the theoretical maximum. I can personally guarantee there won't be 21M people able to own a whole bitcoin.
On the other hand there is probably at least 50% of the world population that will never own $9k either.

Mmmm with the Brrrrrr machine, owning 9K-fiat will be a joke over time  Tongue
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June 27, 2020, 10:03:08 AM

Good morning WO!
Observing @ $ 9,135

All is well!
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June 27, 2020, 10:07:09 AM
Merited by JayJuanGee (1)

@binance
Makes you think.



And 0.269% of the global population is the theoretical maximum. I can personally guarantee there won't be 21M people able to own a whole bitcoin.
On the other hand there is probably at least 50% of the world population that will never own $9k either.
Well 10 years after from now the scenario may not be the same. May be this will be true for 0.1 BTC and then more 10 years after then we may have the same scenario for 0.01 BTC
I mean, after 10 years from now 0.1 BTC may worth  $9k (shit fiat) and more 10 years after 0.01 BTC may worth $9k.
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June 27, 2020, 11:29:12 AM
Merited by JayJuanGee (1), AlcoHoDL (1)


The Biggest Secret Nobody Tells You Before You Start HODLing Bitcoin
tldr: hodling is bumpy road...
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June 27, 2020, 11:53:15 AM
Merited by JayJuanGee (1)

@binance
Makes you think.



And 0.269% of the global population is the theoretical maximum. I can personally guarantee there won't be 21M people able to own a whole bitcoin.
On the other hand there is probably at least 50% of the world population that will never own $9k either.
Well 10 years after from now the scenario may not be the same. May be this will be true for 0.1 BTC and then more 10 years after then we may have the same scenario for 0.01 BTC
I mean, after 10 years from now 0.1 BTC may worth  $9k (shit fiat) and more 10 years after 0.01 BTC may worth $9k.

10 years later the scenario will be slightly different yes, but not by fiat metrics. Currently on average there is enough for each person to have 0.00236103 BTC (18,416,062 / 7.8b), in the future this will be slightly less as the population is expected to grow to 8.5b by 2030, while circulating supply won't be able to keep up with human demand, so this would work out as 0.00235294 BTC approximately (20m / 8.5b) in 2030. My point is this won't change because of the fiat price of Bitcoin, the only variables are circulating supply and population growth.
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June 27, 2020, 02:47:11 PM
Last edit: June 27, 2020, 03:09:29 PM by Febo
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people have false memories regarding bitcoin.
https://youtu.be/ZQmoLOB7580?t=1304
Look at this guy (C. Palihapitya)..claims to learn about btc from Casares (also claims that it was on Casares' 40ies birthday, which actually was in 2014 according to wiki) in 2010 (lol), proceeds to buy it at $80/btc.
One freaking million btc.
Well, either that conversation was in 2013 OR it was in 2010 and the price was 0.8/btc or something like that.
2010 and $80 cannot be both true. Plus, Caesars' 40ies birthday was in 2014.

Besides, a bunch of other strange remarks. Oh, well.

Rare first heard of Bitcoin and buy it at the same time. Usually you first think what a scam and then a year latter you are sorry you did not look more detailed into it. He could have heard of Bitcoin in 2010 but buy in 2013 at $80.  He could also bought in 2011 at $0.8.

EDIT: I see now he said he bought 3 days latter. Yes a pile of bullish. I hope he did not bought at 80 cents.

EDIT2: Maybe was Casares 39th birthday and was February 2013. And he bought a month latter at $80. This seems most close to his story. I mean you can easily mix years but hard to miss you heard on a birthday party and bought few days or weeks latter.
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June 27, 2020, 02:51:52 PM

Whats up gents?

long time no hablas
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June 27, 2020, 03:44:25 PM

Whats up gents?

long time no hablas

Indeed long time no see......
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June 27, 2020, 03:44:44 PM
Merited by El duderino_ (3), vapourminer (2), JayJuanGee (1)


Quote
At the start of 2017,
@Gemini
 was a relatively small exchange amongst its peers

Now it holds more Bitcoin than Bitfinex, Bitstamp, Bittrex, Kraken and Poloniex
https://twitter.com/coinmetrics/status/1276522894537814017

Hi everyone, real life issues keep me out of the forum these days.
Take care

#StrongHats

Hi! Interesting chart. Here's another one, from a different source, that claims something quite differently.



https://twitter.com/glassnode/status/1276525553261187072

Following the link in that tweet, it says Gemini holds around 89k btc. I don't know what to believe though, Coinbase holding 954k sounds like an awful lot.
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June 27, 2020, 04:18:55 PM

https://eodashboard.org/

The tri-agency COVID-19 Dashboard is a concerted effort between the European Space Agency (ESA), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The dashboard combines the resources, technical knowledge and expertise of the three partner agencies to strengthen our global understanding of the environmental and economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Because ... what else do these space exploration agencies have to do?

Oh, right... I guess Elon has their chartered responsibilities covered. Gotta find some work to do.

I keed, I keed.

Still don't get it.

Surely, I am not opposed to various kinds of space explorations, even though we have plenty of problemas here on earth too, and I surely have my doubts that there are any kinds of meaningful and reasonable escapes from this planet, at least in the short term, but it likely does not hurt to either explore or to fantasize in regard to such escapess from earth, including even simple fantasies like going to the moon with actual men.. which likely has not even been done yet... 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_landing#:~:text=The%20United%20States'%20Apollo%2011,1976%20and%2014%20December%202013.

We have surely had a decent number of unmanned missions and successes that seem to be quite credible, but seems very close to made up bullshit and propaganda regarding the supposed manned moon landings, but hey maybe I have not studied the topic deeply enough.. just seems like fantasy bullshit to me in terms of the supposed manned landing aspects of such purported missions that had supposedly taken place.
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June 27, 2020, 04:34:34 PM
Merited by El duderino_ (5), JayJuanGee (1)

Max 6 weeks in the $9k range to go, before adding more days to the $10k bar?



If $10k is the new $1k, we might have another 9 months or more to go:


https://twitter.com/ChartsBtc/status/1276213746369585153
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June 27, 2020, 04:48:46 PM
Last edit: June 27, 2020, 05:05:37 PM by JayJuanGee
Merited by El duderino_ (2)

ALWAYS when this #Bitcoin  signal flashed, we started a MASSIVE bull run!

And guess what: today it flashed again!


https://twitter.com/mmcrypto/status/1276437263916793862?s=21

Are you feeling optimistic, punk?



Please note.  I am not literally calling you a "punk" because I prefer to NOT have a whole "team' of punks coming after me.  hahahahaaha

go take the off-road buggy for a spin in the lower south east 40, perhaps you might come across an armadillo or two that you could run over, to blow off a wee bit of that extra steam...   You will thank me later.  Cool

Hitting the gun range with Rick and a couple friends Saturday afternoon. Imagine that should do the trick. Plan on blowing off about 200 rounds of .223, 50 rounds of 44 mag, 50 rounds of 9mm, and 50 rounds of 45mm... at least.

Still, get off my crank, yo. I just report what I see with regards to short/long momentum on Twitter.

EDIT: Running over armadillos is a dick move.

I stand by my earlier comments, and sure hopefully the gun range serves as a decent stress relief alternative because your online persona surely does seem to have some anger issues...  Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy.   Tongue Tongue

I have been practicing with handgun shooting recently too, and even though I was around guns quite a bit as a kid, I ONLY recently got back into the "hobby" because of reasons.

Guns have changed quite a bit, too, since I was a kid that is for sure.  The whole market and atmosphere around guns seems to have changed a lot since I was a kid... wow... I had not even realized, but I will also admit that there has been some recent thrill with the real life JJG in terms of getting reacquainted with the newer series of guns..

Also, when I was a kid, I mostly thought about guns in terms of hunting, and I had thought that there really was no meaningful reason to need to have home defense or anything related to that.... but perhaps times have changed, especially, very recent times... anyhow, I would really hate to have to use a gun in a real life situation, even though my most recent reacquaintance with guns has largely been in the home or self-defense frame of thinking through scenarios.. and not so much in the context of shooting a rabbit or armadillo to eat or something like that....

Harder to hit anything, anyhow, with a handgun, as opposed to a rifle, and easier yet to hit things with a shotgun, even though a shot gun might not completely stop some hypothetical human attacker until they get a bit closer - and don't really have attack animals in these parts, but a rabid animal attack could happen in a variety of places, I suppose, and maybe a rabid animal might not stop from a shotgun attack until getting hit from a closer range, too.
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June 27, 2020, 05:13:26 PM
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https://eodashboard.org/

The tri-agency COVID-19 Dashboard is a concerted effort between the European Space Agency (ESA), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The dashboard combines the resources, technical knowledge and expertise of the three partner agencies to strengthen our global understanding of the environmental and economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Because ... what else do these space exploration agencies have to do?

Oh, right... I guess Elon has their chartered responsibilities covered. Gotta find some work to do.

I keed, I keed.

Still don't get it.

Surely, I am not opposed to various kinds of space explorations, even though we have plenty of problemas here on earth too, and I surely have my doubts that there are any kinds of meaningful and reasonable escapes from this planet, at least in the short term, but it likely does not hurt to either explore or to fantasize in regard to such escapess from earth, including even simple fantasies like going to the moon with actual men.. which likely has not even been done yet... 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_landing#:~:text=The%20United%20States'%20Apollo%2011,1976%20and%2014%20December%202013.

We have surely had a decent number of unmanned missions and successes that seem to be quite credible, but seems very close to made up bullshit and propaganda regarding the supposed manned moon landings, but hey maybe I have not studied the topic deeply enough.. just seems like fantasy bullshit to me in terms of the supposed manned landing aspects of such purported missions that had supposedly taken place.


REEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!  HISSSSSSSSSSSSS!


you come at me with sarcasm so early in the morning?   en garde!


Quote
Many conspiracists hold that the Apollo Moon landings were a hoax;[74] however, empirical evidence is readily available to show that human Moon landings did occur. Anyone on Earth with an appropriate laser and telescope system can bounce laser beams off three retroreflector arrays left on the Moon by Apollo 11,[75] 14 and 15, verifying deployment of the Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment at historically documented Apollo Moon landing sites and so proving equipment constructed on Earth was successfully transported to the surface of the Moon. In addition, in August 2009 NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter began to send back high resolution photos of the Apollo landing sites. These photos show the large descent stages of the six Apollo Lunar Modules which were left behind, the tracks of the three Lunar Roving Vehicles, and the paths left by the twelve astronauts as they walked in the lunar dust.[76]


--------


I have a soft spot for childlike stories that describe complex problems in simple terms. I came across this one recently. Do your own research.

Quote
Dear Bella,


I’m going to imitate Rudyard Kipling and tell you a just-so story. Kipling was one of the most popular writers in the world 100 years ago. He wrote The Jungle Book. And also Just So Stories, which began as bedtime stories he told his daughter Josephine. They were about how animals got their famous features, like the camel’s hump and the leopard’s spots. Kipling was a wonderful writer but he made up his animal stories. My story is based on science, which means many people, through many recent experiments, have concluded things might “just so” be the way of this story.

It’s also a story about evolution, which is nature’s research and development department. Like Kipling, I’ve given a human voice to certain things: Bacteria form committees and petition the research and development department for answers to their problems, as do plants and dinosaurs. And the R&D department (which is to say, evolution) tries to come up with solutions. I’m going to call evolution “Mr. R&D.” When he finds a problem, Mr. R&D tests things out in different ways to come up with a solution. But sometimes those solutions have unforeseen consequences. So here we go!

    How did birds get such great lungs? They inherited them from dinosaurs. But why did dinosaurs have them?

Once upon a time, on a cold day in January, I was jogging through Regent’s Park in London, stepping carefully through flocks of geese, seagulls, pigeons, and ducks surrounding the boating lake. But, perhaps because of the book I had just been reading (Nick Lane’s Oxygen) my eye picked out a couple of geese that were strangers in this flock: Bar-headed geese, a boy and a girl.

But what were they doing in London in January? During the winter, they usually live in the middle of India, and in the summer they live in Kazakhstan or Mongolia. If you look at a map of the Earth, you can see the barrier between Kazakhstan and India is the Himalayan Mountain Range, the tallest in the world. Every year, millions of bar-headed geese migrate over the Himalayas and have been doing so for millions of years. They have been seen flying at 28,000 feet. They have flown over Mount Everest! How do they do that?

The answer seems to be that bar-headed geese, like all birds—hummingbirds, ostriches, pigeons—have super-efficient lungs. It makes our lungs—and the lungs of all mammals—look primitive. I’m sure when birds get together they gossip about how pathetic our lungs are!


All mammals, including us, breathe in through the same opening that we breathe out. Can you imagine if our digestive system worked the same way? What if the food we put in our mouths, after digestion, came out the same way? It doesn’t bear thinking about! Luckily, for digestion, we have a separate in and out. And that’s what the birds have with their lungs: an in point and an out point. They also have air sacs and hollow spaces in their bones. When they breathe in, half of the good air (with oxygen) goes into these hollow spaces, and the other half goes into their lungs through the rear entrance. When they breathe out, the good air that has been stored in the hollow places now also goes into their lungs through that rear entrance, and the bad air (carbon dioxide and water vapor) is pushed out the front exit. So it doesn’t matter whether birds are breathing in or out: Good air is always going in one direction through their lungs, pushing all the bad air out ahead of it.

How did birds get such great lungs? They inherited them from dinosaurs. Birds are dinosaurs! When I was growing up in the 1940s, there was a category in biology called Aves, which meant birds. But scientists have now folded Aves into a category called Dinosauria, and those dinosauria, like pigeons and seagulls and geese, are flying all around us today. If you want to know what a dinosaur probably tasted like, eat some chicken!


So, dinosaurs had this super-efficient lung system, and they successfully strode the Earth as the dominant species, starting around 250 million years ago to about 65 million years ago, when a huge asteroid crashed into Mexico and most of them went extinct. Except for birds. But why did dinosaurs have this super lung system in the first place?

To answer that, we have to go way back, to when plants came out of the ocean onto land, about 450 million years ago. Earlier than that, plant life lived only in the ocean: The surface of the Earth was a desert.

Seeing an opportunity, some pioneer plants got together and said, “Let’s go!” and migrated up onto land. But once the plants got out of the water, they discovered something they never had to deal with in the ocean: gravity. In the ocean, if you’re a plant, you can just float, because the density of a plant is not that different from water. Out of the ocean, the density of a plant is much greater than air, and so gravity can pull it down.

So for many tens of millions of years, plants on land had to be happy sticking like moss to the surfaces of rocks. But they clearly resented this, and decided to form a committee to request an exemption from Mr. R&D.

Mr. R&D: Hello. What’s your problem?

PC: Our problem is gravity. We never had to deal with it in the ocean, and it’s a problem for us on land.

Mr. R&D: Why is gravity a problem for you?

PC: We want to do what we did in the ocean, which is absorb lots of sunlight, and the best way to do that is to have a long stalk, and then to have branches with leaves at the end of the branches and maximize our potential to absorb sunlight.

MR. R&D: I understand what you want, but it will take me some time. Come back in a million years or so.

The plants twiddle their thumbs for a million years.

PC: OK, a million years is up! Did you manage to discover something?

Mr. R&D: Yes, let me see, I think I have it in the drawer. Here it is: lignin.

PC: What’s lignin?

Mr. R&D: It’s a rigid molecule made of carbon and hydrogen. If you absorb it into the cells of your body, it will interact with the molecules of floppy cellulose you already have, and this will create a very firm structure that will allow your cells to become like bricks. You can then stack one cell upon the other, and you can go as high as you want.

PC: How high?

Mr. R&D: Over 300 feet.

PC: Wow!

So the plants happily swallowed the lignin, and sure enough, it worked exactly as Mr. R&D said, and within a short time stalks, trunks, branches, roots, leaves began popping up all over the Earth.

The only problem was that when one of these trees reached the end of its natural life, bacteria and fungal spores got ready to decompose it, sharpening their knives. But when they got to the lignin, their knives stuck: They couldn’t digest the lignin. The very thing that made lignin strong defeated the bacteria and fungi back then. So, they did what we do when we eat a chicken dinner: They ate all the meat and left the bones, which is to say: the lignin.

Eventually another tree would die and fall on top of the first, and then the same thing would happen again, and another and another, and it kept going like this for hundreds of thousands, millions, tens of millions of years. In the end, over 100 million years of dead trees and ferns and undigested lignin were deposited under the surface of the Earth. We call the time when most of this happened the Carboniferous (carbon-making) age.


Remember how evolution sometimes has unforeseen consequences? Well, this deposit of lignin produced an oxygen surge in the atmosphere. Because for every hydrocarbon atom that goes into the Earth, an oxygen atom is not used up in the decay process. Massive amounts of carbon (lignin) were going into the Earth, so massive amounts of oxygen were building up in the atmosphere. Today, oxygen is 21 percent of the atmosphere. But around 300 million years ago, oxygen was well over 30 percent. There was so much oxygen that insects, who have very inefficient ways of breathing, were able to get huge. Dragonflies had a wingspan of three feet, millipedes were eight feet long. Amphibians—frogs and such—also have inefficient lungs, and they were able to get as big as dining room tables.

The microorganisms of the time eventually became aware of this surge in oxygen. The insects and the amphibians didn’t seem to care, because they were dependent on that rich source of oxygen. So the now-worried microorganisms got their committee (MC) together and went to see Mr. R&D.

Mr. R&D: Hello, what I can do for you?

MC: We think there is a dangerous situation developing, because oxygen levels have gotten higher every year and they might now be at 35 percent.

Mr. R&D: So?

MC: With indigestible lignin, there is nothing to keep it from continuing to go up.

Mr. R&D: I see your point, because at 43 percent a lightning strike will cause the entire atmosphere to ignite since it is so high in flammable oxygen. And the whole experiment of life on Earth will be over. Yes, I agree we have to do something. Give me a million years and I’ll see what I can do.

For a million years, oxygen levels continue to rise. The even more worried microorganisms come back to Mr. R&D.

Mr. R&D: The bad news is I don’t have anything physical to give you. But I can give you a koan.

MC: What’s that?

Mr. R&D: A koan is something you can think of that will help you in your situation. Here it is: “To receive you must first give.”

MC: What does that mean?

Mr. R&D: All I can tell you is: Think about it, and it will solve your problem.

So the microorganisms go away and debate about what this means for 10,000 years or so. Finally, there is one genius fungal cell that wakes up in the middle of the night and thinks, “I’ve got it!” For all of these 100 million years, since the invention of lignin, they had been trying to chew it, and they simply didn’t have the ability to do that: It is too hard and they were too soft.

But thanks to this Isaac Newton of a mushroom spore, they realized what they had to do. They had to give off a special chemical enzyme that dissolves the lignin and breaks it up into smaller pieces externally. And so they invented dry rot.

The decay process pulls oxygen out of the atmosphere and binds it to the hydrocarbons, releasing carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) as a result. This is what happens when wood burns (very rapid oxidation), when we digest food (moderate oxidation), and when organic material decays (slow oxidation).


Once the secret of how to oxidize lignin was understood, fungal spores and bacteria began to break down all the dead wood that was not already fossilized, using up oxygen in the process, and so the level of oxygen in the atmosphere began to decline rapidly. It went from a high of above 30 percent during the Carboniferous Period (300 million years ago) to around 12 percent at the end of the Permian Period (250 million years ago). This was bad news for most of the life on Earth, because it had gotten addicted to this abnormally high oxygen level. Ninety-five percent of all life on Earth died—strangled by an atmosphere so low in oxygen. It was the largest extinction event in the history of life on Earth.

Some of the 5 percent of life forms that did manage to survive went to Mr. R&D and, using what breath they had left, said, “We need help to survive on this small amount of oxygen.”

   
And, 5 million years later, which is the time it took to design this very complicated thing, Mr. R&D came up with a lung system with both an entry point and an exit point, with hollow bones and air-sacs to temporarily store oxygenated air. It was super-efficient compared to any previous lung system and made the best use of the limited oxygen. The animals that received this gift from Mr. R&D were the dinosaurs.

Their new lungs were so efficient that when oxygen levels crept slowly back up to 20 percent over the next many tens of millions of years, dinosaurs were able to get very big—bigger than land mammals like elephants have ever gotten, or ever could get. The super-efficient lungs of many dinosaurs could deliver oxygen to every part of their massive bodies. And having hollow bones helped to reduce their overall weight. When birds evolved from dinosaurs they were able to make very good use of this super-efficient lung system. So that’s how dinosaurs got so big and why bar-headed geese can fly over the Himalayas!

The End.

Or that should be the end. But we have one more character to introduce, and that’s Mr. VCP (Very Clever Primate). About 400 years ago, Mr. VCP found that he could dig down below the surface of the Earth and extract this fossilized lignin, which had turned into coal—and burn it to release the energy that was trapped when it was first deposited. This allowed Mr. VCP’s civilization and population to grow at a phenomenal rate. It was a happy success story once upon a time. Now it has started to become a big problem.

Ninety percent of all the fossil fuels—coal, oil, gas—that we burn today were deposited during the Devonian, Carboniferous, and Permian periods. All that hydrocarbon is now being released into the atmosphere.

So Mr. VCP’s entire civilization is based on burning fossil fuels, which is the result of a quirk in the structure of lignin, and the inability of microorganisms—bacteria and fungi—of the very distant past to break it down. It’s a case of “global indigestion.” Which brings us to our big problem. By burning all these fossil fuels, Mr. VCP is releasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere at a rate 500,000 times faster than it was deposited in the first place. This is causing the atmosphere of the planet to heat up so quickly that it will shortly be damaging, perhaps fatal, to Mr. VCP, unless his civilization figures out a solution.

So Bella, this is where we are now.

I think you know Mr. VCP is us. Maybe if we never started burning fossil fuel, civilization would have continued along the path it was traveling in Shakespeare’s time, 400 years ago. Back then, the whole world was using solar energy—it was just solar energy that was stored short-term: in the grain that we grew to make bread or the hay that horses ate to provide us with real horsepower. Sometimes the energy was not stored at all—we just enjoyed the heat of the sun to dry our vegetables and meat for storage; or the wind to blow the sails of the ships that crisscrossed the world’s oceans; or the water that had fallen as rain to turn the waterwheels to grind our grain. The longest solar storage was the wood (lignin!) in the trees that we cut down to burn for fuel or to make charcoal for blacksmiths to forge iron and steel. Those trees might have been 150 or 200 years old at most.

What can we do now about this problem? First, all of us need to recognize this really is a problem, and hope to convince people in powerful positions to do something about it. The difficult thing is that most old folks grew up thinking that oil, coal, and gas were great, and it is hard to teach old dogs new tricks. You are young and you can see the situation more clearly than older people can.

There are many good alternatives now to burning fossilized hydrocarbons. Windmills. Solar panels. Tidal power. Even some kinds of safe nuclear power like thorium reactors. Scientists are also working on inventions that can pull excess carbon dioxide right out of the atmosphere and turn it into limestone (to build things with: The Egyptian pyramids are made of limestone) or even turn it into fuel. But these inventions need to be scaled up quickly. They are sort of like where rockets were in the 1920s. But in 40 years men had ridden rockets to the moon!

The Earth was scheduled to return to another ice age in about 500 years— with ice two miles thick over Boston, Chicago, Paris, and many other places. But that won’t happen now. There is already too thick of an atmospheric carbon dioxide blanket. We need to treat Earth like our body. We keep our temperature at 98.6. If we feel cold, we burn more “fuel” (food) and that warms us up. And if we get too hot, we perspire and that cools us down. If we’re smart, and organized, we might even be able to transform the Earth into a regulated-temperature planet. We could maintain it there for a long, long time to come, if we cooperate. To do that, we need a world agreement that this is what we are going to do, and then we can do it. This is worth working for!

With love, from Grandpa Walter in London


for educational purposes only
sirazimuth
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June 27, 2020, 05:52:48 PM

@binance
Makes you think.


I think as it stands now .000000000000000001% of population owns 99% of bitcoin and the rest of them are hodeled by the wonderful folks in here....

(no worries, we still gonna be rich my friends)

(edit... ok, I maybe exaggerating a tad...)
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June 27, 2020, 06:10:42 PM

The halvening aftereffects aren't showing up yet. Might be a covid thing or who knows. I'd have bet covid should help if anything. Wait and see, wait and see.
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