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Author Topic: Gold: I smell a trap  (Read 78398 times)
cypherdoc
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August 11, 2011, 03:39:14 AM
 #101

Interesting analysis. I'm still not entirely clear on how you see these insane rounds of "quantitative easing" in the world's reserve currency resulting in deflation long term (short term I could see), but I will keep this in mind while watching the crash roll on.

As a long investor, I have bought into the notion that metals are money and the only hedge against worst case scenarios such as stagflation, but I am also keenly aware that these bubbles are built up and popped by money powers - just as they were during the GD.

the US did not announce any further QE yesterday but did imply they might keep interest rates at 0 until mid 2013.  chumps to steal our hard earned money.  yes, the ECB has indicated they want to monetize Italian/Spain bonds but the Bundesbank is screaming.  Japan has been doing it for decades yet the Yen keeps strengthening as the Nikkei has dumped 75% since the 1980's.  the same could happen to us; pushing on a string yet get persistent grinding deflation and a rising USD.

gold is going parabolic ignoring the deflation all around it.  UST's are soaring also paradoxically.   i took my shorts down today just to get out of the way but am ready to add back on the slightest sign of weakness.  no one knows exactly whats going to happen but i am cautioning that its possible the Fed is targeting PM's to try and get the USD back up.  why wouldn't they want to do this?  its their franchise and they lead the world with the reserve currency.  they're in control i argue, not Congress whom they own.  Timmay and his Congressional buddies all want their IB corner offices you know.

and if you don't believe the conspiracy theories then i argue the parabola is a sign of a bubble blowoff and will pop of its own design.  of course as has been argued quite effectively on this thread it can on for a long time.

look at the other commodities.  most had blowoff tops and then have dumped hard esp. cotton.  silver is lagging and arguably rolling.  gold is the only bull.  stocks have doubled since 3/09 and was the biggest ramp since 1930.  we just had our reflation and it clearly hasn't worked.  its time for deflation.
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August 11, 2011, 03:41:33 AM
 #102

another argument gold bulls like to make is this supposed push for a one world currency in which gold will play a central role and the USD is extinguished.

i would submit to you whats happening to the Euro experiment is evidence that this concept cannot work.  its impossible to have diverse separate sovereign entities with a unified currency.  the laggards like Greece just doom the project.

in this light how's a one world currency going to work?

You will never have a one world currency announced overnight but the plan has long been to cluster regional currencies and "basket currencies" as a stepping stone towards a world currency. The decline of the Euro is arguably bad news for this agenda, but just as the climate zealots never step back from calls for depopulation, neither will the global economic planners from centralization.

I don't think many people can still deny that we are, in nearly every aspect of politics, being herded towards international "governance" and away from localized decision making. If you question this, do a quick read on Agenda 21 or the mass of other "biding treaties" that every developed nation on the globe is signed up for. With centralized policy comes centralized economics and this is already leading to many calls for a new world currency. The eventual Euro and US$ crash will only add fuel to the political fire that has already begun: http://www.thenewamerican.com/economy/markets-mainmenu-45/8517-china-calls-for-global-supervision-of-dollar-new-world-currency

All that said, will this occur in the short term? I highly doubt it. We will need a much higher degree of chaos before a majority of national leaders begin echoing China and Russia in calling for a new global standard.
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August 11, 2011, 03:50:54 AM
 #103

another argument gold bulls like to make is this supposed push for a one world currency in which gold will play a central role and the USD is extinguished.

i would submit to you whats happening to the Euro experiment is evidence that this concept cannot work.  its impossible to have diverse separate sovereign entities with a unified currency.  the laggards like Greece just doom the project.

in this light how's a one world currency going to work?

You will never have a one world currency announced overnight but the plan has long been to cluster regional currencies and "basket currencies" as a stepping stone towards a world currency. The decline of the Euro is arguably bad news for this agenda, but just as the climate zealots never step back neither will the global economic planners.

I don't think many people can still deny that we are, in nearly every aspect of politics, being herded towards international "governance" and away from localized decision making. If you question this, do a quick read on Agenda 21 or the mass of other "biding treaties" that every developed nation on the globe is signed up for. With centralized policy comes centralized economics and this is already leading to many calls for a new world currency. The eventual Euro and US$ crash will only add fuel to the political fire that has already begun: http://www.thenewamerican.com/economy/markets-mainmenu-45/8517-china-calls-for-global-supervision-of-dollar-new-world-currency

All that said, will this occur in the short term? I highly doubt it. We will need a much higher degree of chaos before a majority of national leaders begin echoing China and Russia in calling for a new global standard.

good article.  however, no one trusts the Chinese to supervise a reserve currency; heck they're communists and don't believe in human rights.  also all the harsh rhetoric makes it doubtful you could get them all to share a one world currency.  i sincerely doubt the US Fed will want to destroy itself to let this happen.  USD hegemony is legendary and who would willingly give up that power esp. when your members billions of wealth is stored in USD's?  don't dismiss whats happening to the Euro lightly.  look at the animosity and mud slinging btwn Greece and Germany.  now btwn France and Germany.  memories die hard.  you cannot unite monetary policy w/o fiscal policy. as long as you have borders, armies, and ppl of different color it won't work.  plus the Internet has made the entire planet aware of the shenanigans of central bankers.  there will be revolution before this happens.
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August 11, 2011, 04:04:31 AM
 #104

good article.  however, no one trusts the Chinese to supervise a reserve currency; heck they're communists and don't believe in human rights.  also all the harsh rhetoric makes it doubtful you could get them all to share a one world currency.  i sincerely doubt the US Fed will want to destroy itself to let this happen.  USD hegemony is legendary and who would willingly give up that power esp. when your members billions of wealth is stored in USD's?  don't dismiss whats happening to the Euro lightly.  look at the animosity and mud slinging btwn Greece and Germany.  now btwn France and Germany.  memories die hard.  you cannot unite monetary policy w/o fiscal policy. as long as you have borders, armies, and ppl of different color it won't work.  plus the Internet has made the entire planet aware of the shenanigans of central bankers.  there will be revolution before this happens.

I'm not quite as optimistic as you on the prediction of revolutions against central banking. While there has been a degree of "awakening" in this regard, the movement is still very much a small niche in mainstream politics with a majority of people across the western world still very much stuck in, and dependent upon, the left-right paradigm. Those in conspiracy circles who think that the agenda for a world currency will be spontaneously announced in a grand ceremony or even put to the public for their opinion are lacking in knowledge of how modern central banking systems were introduced.

Of course the US won't give up power overnight, but the insane economic policies, massive debt and state crackdown on the last few productive sectors of the US economy are going to force it to pack up its role as the world's policeman exactly as the spent British Empire did post-WW2. Once again, this won't occur overnight and none of these opinions are intended to influence short term investors as I don't play the same game you folks do; however, in the mid to long term the US is absolutely losing its status as the world's superpower and manager of the reserve currency. This is already occurring with nations looking to move towards "baskets" when trading in big commodities: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/the-demise-of-the-dollar-1798175.html

Take a guess where the clustered regional currencies and basket currencies are intended to lead? http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/currency/5796892/Russian-President-Dmitry-Medvedev-pulls-new-world-currency-from-his-pocket.html
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August 11, 2011, 04:10:27 AM
 #105

i'd like to point out one thing to bullion holders since this is the form that has been pushed heavily by the bulls here on the thread and since i just went thru the liquidation phase of 90% of my bullion.

its alot harder to liquidate than you think. if i'm right and gold bursts from its parabolic ramp, by the time you realize whats happening everyone else will too and the rush to liquidate at your local coin dealers or wherever is going to be very very hard with a large haircut i guarantee.  this is a very dangerous situation which is why i moved out now and b/c of bitcoin.  this is the age of volatility and bullion holders assume that everything is going to go to hell with your fiat USD's being burned in furnaces for heat and you being able to sit in the corner of your house guarding your gold coins and somehow being rich for it.  this won't happen.  i see it more likely that there is a panic induced in the gold market much like there is right now in stocks and you won't be spared.
Bitcoin_Silver_Supply
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August 11, 2011, 04:12:15 AM
 #106

You're trying to protect against volatility by investing heavily in Bitcoin? I mean I see investing as a risk that may pay off very well down the road, but how is BTC possibly protecting you against volatility right now?
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August 11, 2011, 04:17:54 AM
 #107

good article.  however, no one trusts the Chinese to supervise a reserve currency; heck they're communists and don't believe in human rights.  also all the harsh rhetoric makes it doubtful you could get them all to share a one world currency.  i sincerely doubt the US Fed will want to destroy itself to let this happen.  USD hegemony is legendary and who would willingly give up that power esp. when your members billions of wealth is stored in USD's?  don't dismiss whats happening to the Euro lightly.  look at the animosity and mud slinging btwn Greece and Germany.  now btwn France and Germany.  memories die hard.  you cannot unite monetary policy w/o fiscal policy. as long as you have borders, armies, and ppl of different color it won't work.  plus the Internet has made the entire planet aware of the shenanigans of central bankers.  there will be revolution before this happens.

I'm not quite as optimistic as you on the prediction of revolutions against central banking. While there has been a degree of "awakening" in this regard, the movement is still very much a small niche in mainstream politics with a majority of people across the western world still very much stuck in, and dependent upon, the left-right paradigm. Those in conspiracy circles who think that the agenda for a world currency will be spontaneously announced in a grand ceremony or even put to the public for their opinion are lacking in knowledge of how modern central banking systems were introduced.

Of course the US won't give up power overnight, but the insane economic policies, massive debt and state crackdown on the last few productive sectors of the US economy are going to force it to pack up its role as the world's policeman exactly as the spent British Empire did post-WW2. Once again, this won't occur overnight and none of these opinions are intended to influence short term investors as I don't play the same game you folks do; however, in the mid to long term the US is absolutely losing its status as the world's superpower and manager of the reserve currency. This is already occurring with nations looking to move towards "baskets" when trading in big commodities: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/the-demise-of-the-dollar-1798175.html

Take a guess where the clustered regional currencies and basket currencies are intended to lead? http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/currency/5796892/Russian-President-Dmitry-Medvedev-pulls-new-world-currency-from-his-pocket.html

i read those 2 articles back 2 yrs ago in 2009!  nothings happened yet and we still have lots of talk. 

clearly the PPT has stepped back from ramping the stock mkt for the past 2.5 yrs.  why?  they're plunging and will continue to do so.  i think this reflationary ramp of 100% and QE2 injection was to allow the banks to dump their toxic assets and brace themselves for phase 2 of the decline.  its here.  debatably, everything has rolled and i think continues to plunge; not in a straight line but to deep lows, perhaps below 3/09.  do you really expect gold to survive this?

i'm still skeptical of the one world currency.
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August 11, 2011, 04:20:46 AM
 #108

You're trying to protect against volatility by investing heavily in Bitcoin? I mean I see investing as a risk that may pay off very well down the road, but how is BTC possibly protecting you against volatility right now?

i don't have everything in btc but it is a big chunk; more than most i presume.  i expect volatility since its so new altho it hasn't been too bad considering.

i'm comforted b/c its new and in my estimation undervalued.  i can afford to wait 10 years altho i expect it to only take around 5 to become a major player.  this comes with lots of study and i'm convinced the technology is sound and longlasting.
Bitcoin_Silver_Supply
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August 11, 2011, 04:30:46 AM
 #109

clearly the PPT has stepped back from ramping the stock mkt for the past 2.5 yrs.  why?  they're plunging and will continue to do so.  i think this reflationary ramp of 100% and QE2 injection was to allow the banks to dump their toxic assets and brace themselves for phase 2 of the decline.  its here.  debatably, everything has rolled and i think continues to plunge; not in a straight line but to deep lows, perhaps below 3/09.  do you really expect gold to survive this?

i'm still skeptical of the one world currency.

I expect gold to continue acting as it always has as money. If markets recover and we somehow come back to stability I expect it to drop heavily, if we continue to see bottom barrel interest rates on top of 'QE3' and beyond without a new global monetary policy, I expect it to continue to climb to new heights long term - along with the usual dips and rallies.

don't have everything in btc but it is a big chunk; more than most i presume.  i expect volatility since its so new altho it hasn't been too bad considering.

i'm comforted b/c its new and in my estimation undervalued.  i can afford to wait 10 years altho i expect it to only take around 5 to become a major player.  this comes with lots of study and i'm convinced the technology is sound and longlasting.

I agree with you that the technology is here to stay, but I'm not quite so convinced that it will find its natural conclusion in its first major experiment. We have seen how incredibly fragile this currency is over the last month and I don't expect that to change unless it comes to be backed by something more than an idea. The idea may remain, but nothing says that it will be fueled exclusively by BTC.
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August 11, 2011, 04:35:54 AM
 #110

clearly the PPT has stepped back from ramping the stock mkt for the past 2.5 yrs.  why?  they're plunging and will continue to do so.  i think this reflationary ramp of 100% and QE2 injection was to allow the banks to dump their toxic assets and brace themselves for phase 2 of the decline.  its here.  debatably, everything has rolled and i think continues to plunge; not in a straight line but to deep lows, perhaps below 3/09.  do you really expect gold to survive this?

i'm still skeptical of the one world currency.

I expect gold to continue acting as it always has as money. If markets recover and we somehow come back to stability I expect it to drop heavily, if we continue to see bottom barrel interest rates on top of 'QE3' and beyond without a new global monetary policy, I expect it to continue to climb to new heights long term - along with the usual dips and rallies.

don't have everything in btc but it is a big chunk; more than most i presume.  i expect volatility since its so new altho it hasn't been too bad considering.

i'm comforted b/c its new and in my estimation undervalued.  i can afford to wait 10 years altho i expect it to only take around 5 to become a major player.  this comes with lots of study and i'm convinced the technology is sound and longlasting.

I agree with you that the technology is here to stay, but I'm not quite so convinced that it will find its natural conclusion in its first major experiment. We have seen how incredibly fragile this currency is over the last month and I don't expect that to change unless it comes to be backed by something more than an idea. The idea may remain, but nothing says that it will be fueled exclusively by BTC.

fair enough.  your opinion is just as good as mine.

but what does the last months volatility have to do with bitcoin?  the exchanges were the problem.  mtgox seems to have stabilized its security thank god and i only expect that to be worked out over time with the others.
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August 11, 2011, 04:44:30 AM
 #111

Arguing that the exchanges currently have nothing to do with BTC is akin to arguing that fiat dollars have nothing to do with central banks.

It doesn't mean that BTC is doomed - far from it. However, there is a lot of reason to view it as a speculative currency rather than a hedge against mainstream market volatility right now. I tend to look at it as a very risky investment with the potential to pay out handsomely if the stars align and the inevitable competitors fail.
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August 11, 2011, 05:06:02 AM
 #112

Arguing that the exchanges currently have nothing to do with BTC is akin to arguing that fiat dollars have nothing to do with central banks.

huh?  btc isn't issued by exhanges but fiat is by central banks.

It doesn't mean that BTC is doomed - far from it. However, there is a lot of reason to view it as a speculative currency rather than a hedge against mainstream market volatility right now. I tend to look at it as a very risky investment with the potential to pay out handsomely if the stars align and the inevitable competitors fail.

i agree with this and i've taken my profits out of pm's and into what i think may be the next big thing.
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August 11, 2011, 06:02:52 AM
 #113

Get ready for another consolidated reply of epic proportions. Homer's got nothing on me!

*Disclaimer: I am an a**hole and I have an opinion. Don't take anything personally - think for yourself.

well i do too since 2005.  i asked you before and i'll ask again.  when did you start?

You've been dabbling with Bitcoin 4 years before it began? Smiley

Nine days or nine years, it doesn't matter. Focus on what's relevant.

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its just a simple bet.  i don't think equities can be propped up like you do and i do think they'll be lower one year from now.  no insult intended.

Alright, next time just ask.

My opinion is that equities have already been propped up and can be for some time still. How long, I have no idea, nor do I particularly care. An overall index gives a very general (and somewhat vague) idea of health when I'm concentrating on which aspects will thrive in adversity. The next reflation effort might fail spectacularly and we could see the S&P at 200 next year, or it could succeed in keeping the dollar-denominated number up despite a deflation in real value. A better question might be whether I think the markets will be more valuable next year.

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heck no.  i'm learning alot. no need to get personal.

Good, never stop learning; I agree - deep breaths. No rush.

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i don't agree with your thesis.

http://www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h41/current/h41.htm#h41tab9

there is only 2.8T worth of FRN's and required/excess reserves out there.  compared to orders of magnitude more debt/virtual USD's.  60% of world debt is denom in USD's.  sovereign debt has hit the wall.  we are now getting defaults.  this will decrease the total amt of USD's worldwide.  on top of that, foreign denom debt is defaulting as well and they are reserved in USD's.  this increases the demand for remaining USD's whether they desire them or not.  these 2 factors should force the value of the USD up.  the recent swap lines are evidence of this.

Fair enough, most don't initially.

You've hit the problem on the head - over half of the entire world's debt is in dollars, yet there is only a base of about $3 trillion. Now how does that debt deflate? It doesn't simply disappear. Real assets will deflate after being insanely over-valued, but taking a hit on the debt will be fought every step along the way. Who wants to realize their losses, especially catastrophic ones?

Once credit is extended, it is extremely difficult to reel it back in. It isn't as though a simple recall can be issued on fractional reserves. There's only so much that can be "sterilized" by reducing the monetary base, and the more it's reduced, the harder it gets for small business to actually do business.

With asset deflation, obviously prices fall in dollar denomination. If credit/debt losses aren't pared along with that, there is no accompanying drop in the total currency. Since debt is being treated as collateral (and has been for decades), it has effectively been monetized without experiencing a return on the credit offered. This is the leverage that has propelled the system. If the devaluing credit/debt were allowed to contract, major institutions would find themselves bankrupt. Because of this, we have to take a step outside of the purely financial realm.

If a major automobile manufacturer were to collapse, it could take tens of thousands of jobs. There are other jobs associated with those 10,000 so the collateral damage will expand the problem. When there are enough jobs lost, overall income is reduced and people struggle just to survive. Eventually, even survival becomes so difficult that many turn to crime, with some becoming violent. After a little while of that, people start to realize that things aren't going to get better and they begin to revolt.

Actions taken so far have shown that instead of accepting the losses, the US will try to monetize the credit/debt no matter what. It is easier to minimize the rising anger than to deal with the full shock. The problem with this is that there is already a large percentage of the population reduced from a modest lifestyle to abject poverty. The longer the problem is put off by inflating the base currency to fill the deflation-induced gaps and avoid losses, the more people will fall into despondency due to underlying deflationary effects. This can be equated to swimming against a riptide: the harder you struggle, the more exhausted you'll become and the farther out to sea. It's a losing battle.

Thinking that stimulus (bailout, printing, whatever you want to call it) won't continue is a naive position, especially now. Too many people are unemployed and angry at government. If a decline were allowed to occur in 2008, the ranks of not-yet-unemployed would've been able to weather several months to a year or so of poor economic activity during the correction. Instead, millions of people have exhausted up to 2 years of unemployment "benefits" in addition to savings and even retirement funds in many cases. Such a shock, even for only a few months, would completely wipe out anyone in that situation at this point. This is why stimulus and hence inflation will continue.

Coming back to the financial aspect: $3 trillion is nowhere near enough to monetize the US outstanding debt. Even if the $14 trillion national debt were forgiven, there's still $16 trillion in private debt that's mostly held by domestic banks. A 20% decline in assets now (or 10% with nat'l & private debt @ $30 trillion) would cause widespread defaults and extreme hardship. It becomes plain to see that, since credit cannot be sterilized as base money can, every effort must be made to deleverage the money supply by monetizing the debt so as to prevent nationwide defaults from margin requirements - cries for help will be met with free/cheap dollars.

You can imagine how the situation is made many, many times worse by foreign-held US debt. Consider the amount of derivatives outstanding as per the BIS: over $600 trillion (before the revisions made after 2009 from $1.4 quadrillion). While not all of it is US debt, the same problems arise in the major currencies. Therefore, they must be propped up as well. The total global leverage is as high as 100 to 200:1 - a mere 0.5 to 1.0% drop in asset valuation could cripple the worldwide financial system. Everyone would be screaming for everyone else to pay up - a run on derivatives.

The only realistic solution today is to keep the game going in the hopes that things will just work out in the end. Living on a prayer only works for the one-in-a-million who becomes a rockstar in a rags-to-riches saga. There are fewer than 300 recognized nations in the world. Those are not good odds.

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how can you be so sure?  in fact i doubt gold will ever become the world reserve currency like it was in the past.  its an artifact of the past.  the last couple of decades has seen the advent of the Internet.  i believe it has changed the world as a disruptive force.  never before has the avg American been able to peer behind the curtain see what its gov't/Fed have been doing to rob all of us.  the awareness of Americans is at an all time high.  Bitcoin is an extension of this and in my opinion stands a better chance of eventually being the reserve currency.  you're better off investing in an undervalued currency like Bitcoin than a parabolically moving hunk of metal near a top.

how do you buy a loaf of bread with gold?  how do you transport it around the world to balance payments of countries?  its weight alone is prohibitive for any practical use.  you have to build forts to store it.  how do you weigh it to buy a pencil?  who cares that its been money for centuries; the Internet has only practically been around for 10 years.  computers, servers, and cell phones dominate our lives.  what did i used to do?  oh yeah, go to the beach, take walks, talk to my wife.  instead i'm here banging away.

You said yourself, they're pushing on a string. This case of diminishing returns eventually goes negative. The game will keep working until it doesn't, like a marathon runner who finally keels over because his body is no longer responding. Gold is signalling the transition point from progression to regression. Just because people are aware doesn't mean they understand yet. Bitcoin may be an ideal reserve currency, but gold is an ideal reserve asset. A grocery store is wonderful so long as it has groceries. Bitcoin works great as long as the network is operational. Gold is great only if you have it. Both Bitcoin and gold are essential. Together, they are Captain Planet!

I'm not happy about this even though I understand it. Believe me, I'd rather be back studying something other than economics, but there's so much at stake here that it'll become every man for himself before long. No, you can't eat your gold, but it's a better bet than treasuries will be after a 10% decline in global asset valuation and all paper is viewed with suspicion. Then try getting gold. I don't even like gold - I think it's gaudy and heavy. Too bad, it happens to be the best store of value on the planet right now. Bitcoin has potential, but until it's easily recognized, I'll use the two in complementary fashion.

How many gold coins do you need to carry with you to start a new life elsewhere? If living expenses keep deflating, a single ounce of gold may come to be an average person's life savings. For now, at almost $2,000 per coin, a suitcase would easily hold a hundred ounces or so. Just make sure you've got wheels on it and hope you don't get stopped at a border. The latter problem applies to paper money too. That's where Bitcoin comes in.

Stick some gold in a bank as collateral and you can use the same currency system you've always been used to. Buy some 1/10th ounce coins and buy enough groceries to feed the family for a month. The internet may have caused whirlwind change, but it hasn't eliminated the need for food, water, shelter and a method of acquiring them. Without the internet, no Bitcoin. Then what?

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as i said above, if they're dependent that all that matters.  who cares if they don't desire them?

That doesn't answer where I said they're dependent.

Collective sentiment is everything - money's value arises from subjective perception. Otherwise, gold would just be metal. Nothing would be worth anything relative to anything else. If people lose their belief in the dollar's value, it no longer has value.

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in the case of TARP and most likely June 2011 they're meant to prevent insolvency; a much more serious situation.  they keep the foreigners dependent on the USD and will sustain demand.

I agree, solvency is the greater issue there. Where does the demand come from? The need to create more paper products - more derivatives? What of real wealth and stability? A number of regions have already been detailing efforts to move off the dollar to Euros or other currencies, including gold. No dependency there.

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i agree but i don't think the gov't/Fed can stop the implosion and deflation.  i think they've come to this realization and are stepping away from the markets by no QE.  as the collapse unfolds, the demand for cash/USD by everyday Americans will overwhelm the price of gold.  debt defaults will accelerate shrinking the money supply.  the scramble for cash has begun and the margin calls are going out.

Oh, they certainly can't stop it, just delay it. Don't be surprised by a resumption of QE, though. It might be through other methods, maybe price controls or interest rate limits, but as I offered above it will happen. The alternative is social revolt.

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things have gotten worse.  seasonal patterns don't always work out.  you don't always have to have a parabolic blowoff to end every bull.   look at the Dow.  i stripped off the indicators you mentioned to make a specific point.  yes i do use them.

you are good at the fundamentals.  i used to rely on them much more than i do now b/c no one can know everything and sometimes things aren't as they appear.  i've learned that the charts tell a much bigger part of the story IMO.  i'm trying to identify a top to the longest bull market in existence today.  no question it'll be tough going when everyone around me is onboard this train.

You're right, seasonal patterns aren't always reliable. But they are more often than not, otherwise they wouldn't be seasonal.

That's true, not every bull goes parabolic. Of course, not every bull involves an asset in such demand yet so restrained as gold is. Again, equities and gold are different animals; gold is closer to currencies than stocks.

Thanks - you've made some good inferences yourself. My only concern is that the interpretations may be based on inappropriate assumptions considering the circumstances, which was why I offered my thoughts in the first place. Are you sure you want to be standing in front of this train?

Watch gold's behavior without bias; there are innate patterns. After a long period of consolidation following a major spike drop, it will steadily rise to previous highs. Then it begins a stair-step pattern: price will jump, then trend sideways for a bit, jump again, trend sideways, and so on. It'll do this for a while and the rate of jumps will increase. Finally, the trend will begin ascending until a mini-parabolic run temporarily exhausts the metal. That's when major interests will start selling in earnest and a straight drop will occur.

It was plain to see this selling attempt prior to US market open on the 9th, but demand was still too great and overwhelmed the shorts. There's another attempt being made as I type, but it seems to be very rough going - $1,770 won't be an easy break if it's managed.

do you have any idea how ridiculous what you just said is?  

Take ten deep breaths and go grab a beer.

since when is potentially losing 100BTC or $1000 not a consequence?  i wasn't even talking to you.

Take another ten deep breaths and pop a valium - I can see your forehead veins pulsating from here Smiley

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money velocity is in the tank.  this is deflationary.

i'm familiar with Gresham's Law.  bad money forces out good from gov't enforcement.  whats your point other than that gold and bitcoin are being hoarded b/c of the prospect for higher valuation?

Absolutely! What does that mean for small business? Credit that is normally needed for operations might not be available, so if a small business doesn't have cash on hand, commerce grinds to a halt. If transactions become unreliable, there would certainly be a rush to cash. That increases volatility, so approporiate pricing of goods and services takes on an increased share of effort until things stabilize. How long until that point is anyone's guess. Do you think people will take kindly to their leaders at that point, or will they be rioting and demanding to "throw the bums out" as in Greece and London (the latter had tensions running high already, so a normally upsetting event became the spark for an eruption far greater than expected)?

Gold and Bitcoins would be hoarded not because of the prospect of higher valuation (that is a motivation for savvy investors), but because of a desire to escape from the domestic currency (e.g. USD) - the hot potato. The dollar is still necessary as legal tender, but it will be prudent to get rid of the liability before it burns too big a hole in your pocket. Smart money already realizes this and has been steadily acquiring real assets, including gold. The 80% of money that is retail will scramble to enter for the last 20% rise, causing the parabolic effect.

the USD increased in value today.  still consolidating.  no breakdown.

gold is rallying like it intends to be the reserve currency of the world.  or is it just the end stages of a parabolic blowoff only to do another 1980?

The dollar needs to close above 76.5 to cause a major reversal in the flow of funds. Negative divergence in long bond - it looks tired. Gold is finally getting a little unstable. It's a growing possibility that we could see a drop in the safe havens for the rest of the week.

The topic of a centralized world currency is terrifying if it's controlled by the usual suspects. I don't trust any human sleazebag to run the show. That's why my hope is with Bitcoin and similarly decentralized systems. The value from Bitcoin might be preserved during transition to a successor, should one arise. I think major adoption of it will probably take at least 3 years, as will resistance to existing power bases.

As I was writing this, I saw that the CME Group raised margin requirements, in particular on gold (+22%) and the Swiss franc (+400%). Normally, this takes the wind out of gold's sails, but today it barely registered. Watch for more margin raises in the near future (and the correction we've all been waiting for) - the COMEX will become a 100% cash market soon. This tells me that there's overwhelming demand for physical metal by interests with sufficient capital to take delivery. If anything is bullish, that is. Bullish on volatility as well. Mind the normal ups and downs.

In this market, I wouldn't trade anything but buy & hold assets (gold, Bitcoin, dividend-paying ag, energy & mining equities) or long-dated, far out-of-the-money options. Buying puts and calls in quantity for peanuts (with a few bullish vertical spreads here and there) and being patient is far better than staring at screens all day long. If I catch 50% of a major move, I'm golden (pun intended); anything more is icing. Meanwhile, I can spend time with friends and family, meet with business partners, walk the dog, lounge in the sun...

I feel my brain oozing out of my ear. Time for a break.
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August 11, 2011, 02:03:20 PM
 #114

Very informative, ty!
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August 11, 2011, 02:30:59 PM
 #115

so i'm back in with a more manageable short on GLD and SLW. Cry
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August 11, 2011, 02:42:49 PM
 #116

Me too.
Very very short on gold around 1795 today. Can be a big winner on the way down

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August 11, 2011, 03:25:31 PM
 #117

On the way down to where?

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August 11, 2011, 03:45:06 PM
 #118

On the way down to where?
Someone able to answer this would be probably rich enough to not bother checking threads like this one ;-)

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August 11, 2011, 03:46:20 PM
 #119

On the way down to where?

My personal short/mid term targets are 1300-1400, then 1000. Then we will see whether we also reach 600-800.

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August 11, 2011, 04:29:19 PM
 #120

My personal short/mid term targets are 1300-1400, then 1000. Then we will see whether we also reach 600-800.

With all due respect, dream on! Wink
I bet 1 BTC we will never see 1000 USD/1 oz again.
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