Bitcoin Forum
September 23, 2019, 04:08:55 AM *
News: If you like a topic and you see an orange "bump" link, click it. More info.
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register More  
Pages: « 1 ... 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 [70] 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 ... 160 »
  Print  
Author Topic: New Official AMT Thread  (Read 149167 times)
This is a self-moderated topic. If you do not want to be moderated by the person who started this topic, create a new topic.
FrictionlessCoin
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 854
Merit: 1000


★YoBit.Net★ 1400+ Coins Exchange


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:08:26 PM
 #1381

Getting back to technical.....so is the issue with the cards blowing a hardware problem then? The traces shorting or some other component causing problems? I would presume a single chip blowing would still allow the rest of the card to function unless there was some kind of daisy chain that cuts the electrical flow.

Oh.... I had thought the chips were daisy chained.   You mean they are not?  You mean we can individually remove chips from the board and it will still work?  

Is that correct?  

That is what I don't know. I know the cards are daisy chained on the backplane. But the chips on the card is what I am not sure of. Without any further info or documentation on the design we have no idea. I will need to take a closer look as I actually haven't. I probably will later after I get some time to sit down for a while and work on it.

Oh... the cards are daisy chained?  So if one card fails, the others don't work?

Anyway for chips,  read this:  http://bitmine.ch/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/CoinCraft-A1.pdf

and look at this wiring diagram:  https://github.com/bitmine-ch/bitmine

It looks to me like they are daisy chained.

BTW, anyone here done any PCB manufacturing and SMD reflow sodering?  You think we can have some of these dual boards created?

1569211735
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1569211735

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1569211735
Reply with quote  #2

1569211735
Report to moderator
1569211735
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1569211735

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1569211735
Reply with quote  #2

1569211735
Report to moderator
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
opieum2
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 532
Merit: 500


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:11:44 PM
 #1382

Getting back to technical.....so is the issue with the cards blowing a hardware problem then? The traces shorting or some other component causing problems? I would presume a single chip blowing would still allow the rest of the card to function unless there was some kind of daisy chain that cuts the electrical flow.
We will have to hear back on whatever isawhim's idea is with the not-responding board.

The traces we were talking about are 2 different things, one being the boards power-planes being shorted by a screw.

My ruminations are about the A1 chips internal power routing: There are 7 power pads feeding in Vdd: 4 very large ones, 2 smaller ones in 2 corners plus one more very small one. If for whatever reason all the big Vdd pads are not connected from bad soldering or not properly bypassed (missing caps) then it is very possible that connections inside the chip which are still getting power could overload and open up killing the chip. Methinks isawhim is going to try and get around that.

That actually would be great news if there is a way around it. I got my soldering iron unpacked in the event I need to use it Cheesy

Hopefully even with that I can bring back the one card that is preventing an entire setup from coming up.

I will post results on the other cards tonight and see if a software method of bringing them up is possible. Either way we get a new firmware to work with.

The pidora based firmware I am using has the following:

screen
cgminer 4.3.3
And all the dev tools needed to compile packages from source.

SSH is also built in as well.

I have not added any web component at this point until I have it working (thats a later feature)

If it brings the cards back then project zombie will be a success!


"amtminers scam joshua zipkin scammer"
-Joshua Zipkin leaked skype chats http://bit.ly/1s7U2Yb
-For bitcoin to succeed the community must police itself.
FrictionlessCoin
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 854
Merit: 1000


★YoBit.Net★ 1400+ Coins Exchange


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:12:51 PM
 #1383

Getting back to technical.....so is the issue with the cards blowing a hardware problem then? The traces shorting or some other component causing problems? I would presume a single chip blowing would still allow the rest of the card to function unless there was some kind of daisy chain that cuts the electrical flow.
We will have to hear back on whatever isawhim's idea is with the not-responding board. It does seem that some of the local decoupling caps are missing/erroneously changed with resistors.

You can't be serious here.

NotFuzzyWarm
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1932
Merit: 1327


Evil beware: We have waffles!


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:13:36 PM
 #1384

Those are the references I use Tongue They also have complete info 2-chip reference board including the gerber files for making a pcb and parts list for it. Whether or not the reference design works... who knows but it's all we have to go by.

For bitcoin to succeed the community must police itself - Joshua Zipkin aka Joshua Alexander leaked AMT A1 miner skype chats
How a miner mfgr SHOULD operate: HaggsFIN trip to Canaan My info useful? Donations welcome! 1Fuzzyk398kDWVjuC5qPX5v6CjSkvbgAbd
-Support Sidehacks miner development. Donations to:   1BURGERAXHH6Yi6LRybRJK7ybEm5m5HwTr
NotFuzzyWarm
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1932
Merit: 1327


Evil beware: We have waffles!


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:16:24 PM
 #1385

Getting back to technical.....so is the issue with the cards blowing a hardware problem then? The traces shorting or some other component causing problems? I would presume a single chip blowing would still allow the rest of the card to function unless there was some kind of daisy chain that cuts the electrical flow.
We will have to hear back on whatever isawhim's idea is with the not-responding board. It does seem that some of the local decoupling caps are missing/erroneously changed with resistors.

You can't be serious here.
yes we are. Start at https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=569769.msg6754740#msg6754740
they are physically identical packages aside from the numbers on them. Someone screwed up badly there with what reel got loaded into the stuffing machine.

For bitcoin to succeed the community must police itself - Joshua Zipkin aka Joshua Alexander leaked AMT A1 miner skype chats
How a miner mfgr SHOULD operate: HaggsFIN trip to Canaan My info useful? Donations welcome! 1Fuzzyk398kDWVjuC5qPX5v6CjSkvbgAbd
-Support Sidehacks miner development. Donations to:   1BURGERAXHH6Yi6LRybRJK7ybEm5m5HwTr
opieum2
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 532
Merit: 500


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:21:21 PM
 #1386

Getting back to technical.....so is the issue with the cards blowing a hardware problem then? The traces shorting or some other component causing problems? I would presume a single chip blowing would still allow the rest of the card to function unless there was some kind of daisy chain that cuts the electrical flow.

Oh.... I had thought the chips were daisy chained.   You mean they are not?  You mean we can individually remove chips from the board and it will still work?  

Is that correct?  

That is what I don't know. I know the cards are daisy chained on the backplane. But the chips on the card is what I am not sure of. Without any further info or documentation on the design we have no idea. I will need to take a closer look as I actually haven't. I probably will later after I get some time to sit down for a while and work on it.

Oh... the cards are daisy chained?  So if one card fails, the others don't work?

Anyway for chips,  read this:  http://bitmine.ch/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/CoinCraft-A1.pdf

and look at this wiring diagram:  https://github.com/bitmine-ch/bitmine

It looks to me like they are daisy chained.

BTW, anyone here done any PCB manufacturing and SMD reflow sodering?  You think we can have some of these dual boards created?

Well not exactly. The cards will work even if one in the chain fails. My comment was more on the chips on the card itself. The backplane thing still sort of a daisy chain tho its not a dependent on the previous card in the chain being connected.

One clue that thanks to ISAWHIM made me consider its a software issue, is the fact that the cards actually COULD come back up after numerous reboots. Almost a chance event...except its not. It just means that there was just enough of a delay for the system to detect the card during the HW detection process. Also with the "dead" cards, it could just be a hardware problem. It could also be that the are taking longer than they should to come up. BUT might be able to revive them. So we got two fronts now to address these problems (your welcome AMT) Software and Hardware. More than likely the hardware side will yield better results, but the software at least can compensate for some of the other glitches as well.  

"amtminers scam joshua zipkin scammer"
-Joshua Zipkin leaked skype chats http://bit.ly/1s7U2Yb
-For bitcoin to succeed the community must police itself.
FrictionlessCoin
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 854
Merit: 1000


★YoBit.Net★ 1400+ Coins Exchange


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:22:50 PM
 #1387

Getting back to technical.....so is the issue with the cards blowing a hardware problem then? The traces shorting or some other component causing problems? I would presume a single chip blowing would still allow the rest of the card to function unless there was some kind of daisy chain that cuts the electrical flow.
We will have to hear back on whatever isawhim's idea is with the not-responding board. It does seem that some of the local decoupling caps are missing/erroneously changed with resistors.

You can't be serious here.
yes we are. https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=569769.msg6754740#msg6754740
they are physically identical packages aside from the numbers on them. Someone screwed up badly there with what reel got loaded into the stuffing machine.

Those orange thingies...  I checked with digikey... http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/T520D337M006ATE010/399-9780-2-ND/3724870   those are capacitors.

Correct me if I'm wrong here... it's been over 20 years since I worked on this stuff.

NotFuzzyWarm
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1932
Merit: 1327


Evil beware: We have waffles!


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:28:31 PM
 #1388

SMD resistors come in the same package. The ones isa found that begin with R+ are 10k resistors. Those should be caps.

For bitcoin to succeed the community must police itself - Joshua Zipkin aka Joshua Alexander leaked AMT A1 miner skype chats
How a miner mfgr SHOULD operate: HaggsFIN trip to Canaan My info useful? Donations welcome! 1Fuzzyk398kDWVjuC5qPX5v6CjSkvbgAbd
-Support Sidehacks miner development. Donations to:   1BURGERAXHH6Yi6LRybRJK7ybEm5m5HwTr
FrictionlessCoin
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 854
Merit: 1000


★YoBit.Net★ 1400+ Coins Exchange


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:28:48 PM
 #1389

Anyone know anything about the GPIO daughter board?

Pin layouts on it?    

What I really don't get,  is that there's a reference board with layout and BOM.  Is it not obvious how to actually create a board for this?  All that's on the system is are A1 chips and a voltage regulator.  

Just string up 4-8 of these and you have your system.  The driver code for the PI is also available.

What the hell am I missing here?  How complicated can this get?

NotFuzzyWarm
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1932
Merit: 1327


Evil beware: We have waffles!


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:33:09 PM
 #1390

Anyone know anything about the GPIO daughter board?

Pin layouts on it?    

What I really don't get,  is that there's a reference board with layout and BOM.  Is it not obvious how to actually create a board for this?  All that's on the system is are A1 chips and a voltage regulator.  

Just string up 4-8 of these and you have your system.  The driver code for the PI is also available.

What the hell am I missing here?  How complicated can this get?

Not sure how well the reference boards work but if they do, then yes, just get a bunch and string'em up. Is what the Ant's do. Looking at their boards each is made from 4 identical sectors. Each sector even has it's own Vcore supply.

I assume that BM.ch just wanted a 'clean' design for the 8-chip boards. And blew it royaly.

For bitcoin to succeed the community must police itself - Joshua Zipkin aka Joshua Alexander leaked AMT A1 miner skype chats
How a miner mfgr SHOULD operate: HaggsFIN trip to Canaan My info useful? Donations welcome! 1Fuzzyk398kDWVjuC5qPX5v6CjSkvbgAbd
-Support Sidehacks miner development. Donations to:   1BURGERAXHH6Yi6LRybRJK7ybEm5m5HwTr
FrictionlessCoin
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 854
Merit: 1000


★YoBit.Net★ 1400+ Coins Exchange


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:34:19 PM
 #1391

Okay... so if there happen to be resistors and not capacitors that should be there... a temporary fix is just to remove the resistors.

The capacitors are there to mitigate against voltage spikes, but it is not entirely necessary.


FrictionlessCoin
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 854
Merit: 1000


★YoBit.Net★ 1400+ Coins Exchange


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:36:44 PM
 #1392

Anyone know anything about the GPIO daughter board?

Pin layouts on it?    

What I really don't get,  is that there's a reference board with layout and BOM.  Is it not obvious how to actually create a board for this?  All that's on the system is are A1 chips and a voltage regulator.  

Just string up 4-8 of these and you have your system.  The driver code for the PI is also available.

What the hell am I missing here?  How complicated can this get?

Not sure how well the reference boards work but if they do, then yes, just get a bunch and string'em up. Is what the Ant's do. Looking at their boards each is made from 4 identical sectors. Each sector even has it's own Vcore supply.

I assume that BM.ch just wanted a 'clean' design for the 8-chip boards. And blew it royaly.

I think they blew it because they didn't layout the board in a way that you can have large heatsinks!

Bitmine design have heatsinks only a little bit bigger than AMT.

It is not like the Technobit and Dragon design where the heat sink in much bigger.

Man... I really don't want to do electronics... but heck... is this not dirt simple?

BTW... Innosilicon A1 chips are going for $45 a piece.   The A2 is around $185 but use the same layout.

If anyone has got some minor experience in this,  we can layout a board and do our own manufacturing!!! Wee!

aasl
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 476
Merit: 250



View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:38:05 PM
 #1393

reserved...

For security, your account has been locked. Email acctcomp15@theymos.e4ward.com
NotFuzzyWarm
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1932
Merit: 1327


Evil beware: We have waffles!


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:38:34 PM
 #1394

<snip>

The capacitors are there to mitigate against voltage spikes, but it is not entirely necessary.
Don't bet on it. At the clock frequencies the ASIC run at those spikes/dips can cause all kinds of havoc if not decoupled at the chip. Methinks that kind of oversimplified thinking is what got BM.ch into trouble in the first place. Power distribution at high switching speed loads is a very localized thing.

For bitcoin to succeed the community must police itself - Joshua Zipkin aka Joshua Alexander leaked AMT A1 miner skype chats
How a miner mfgr SHOULD operate: HaggsFIN trip to Canaan My info useful? Donations welcome! 1Fuzzyk398kDWVjuC5qPX5v6CjSkvbgAbd
-Support Sidehacks miner development. Donations to:   1BURGERAXHH6Yi6LRybRJK7ybEm5m5HwTr
FrictionlessCoin
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 854
Merit: 1000


★YoBit.Net★ 1400+ Coins Exchange


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:40:54 PM
 #1395

<snip>

The capacitors are there to mitigate against voltage spikes, but it is not entirely necessary.
Don't bet on it. At the clock frequencies the ASIC run at those spikes/dips can cause all kinds of havoc if not decoupled at the chip. Methinks that thinking is what got BM.ch into trouble in the first place. Power distribution at high switching speed loads is a very localized thing.

Okay... so if you think its a problem with switching speed... why don't we just plop in a slower oscillator?  You know,  just to see if it works.

opieum2
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 532
Merit: 500


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:53:22 PM
 #1396

Anyone know anything about the GPIO daughter board?

Pin layouts on it?    

What I really don't get,  is that there's a reference board with layout and BOM.  Is it not obvious how to actually create a board for this?  All that's on the system is are A1 chips and a voltage regulator.  

Just string up 4-8 of these and you have your system.  The driver code for the PI is also available.

What the hell am I missing here?  How complicated can this get?

Not sure how well the reference boards work but if they do, then yes, just get a bunch and string'em up. Is what the Ant's do. Looking at their boards each is made from 4 identical sectors. Each sector even has it's own Vcore supply.

I assume that BM.ch just wanted a 'clean' design for the 8-chip boards. And blew it royaly.

I think they blew it because they didn't layout the board in a way that you can have large heatsinks!

Bitmine design have heatsinks only a little bit bigger than AMT.

It is not like the Technobit and Dragon design where the heat sink in much bigger.

Man... I really don't want to do electronics... but heck... is this not dirt simple?

BTW... Innosilicon A1 chips are going for $45 a piece.   The A2 is around $185 but use the same layout.

If anyone has got some minor experience in this,  we can layout a board and do our own manufacturing!!! Wee!

Actually it takes the right kind of heatsink for proper efficiency too...thinner but more numerous fins can work quite well. I have passively cooled Dual XEONs. I have intake and outake in the cases. To some degree you are correct however. Larger heatsinks. BUT if IMET or whoever made the heatsinks had made smaller thinner heatsinks and better milled they would have worked well, as it is they look like shit with all sorts of grooves that have room for air pockets. And I am referring to the part contacting the chip. While thermal grease will help with that, its only so much. Milling needs to be done right. I might lap down to as close to a mirror finish on one or two of the heatinks with a before and after test on one of my 3 working cards at some point if the cards don't crap out on me first. I might localize it to the specific chip areas as those are some big ass heatsinks to do the whole thing to.

But if the heatsinks had thinner more numerous fins and even a smaller size (looking at the bitmain s2 asic boards heatink) they could manage much better. Less heat to hold and transfer off. Copper would be ideal but very expensive just due to volume alone. Or even a heatpipe design to transfer heat off effectively.

The overall design of the DIY kit as I got it was lacking in one area. There was the "small heatsinks" side of the card on one card that got no air. I had to cool that using a separate fan. It got no air and inevitably also failed. Altho that could have been for any number of reasons.

"amtminers scam joshua zipkin scammer"
-Joshua Zipkin leaked skype chats http://bit.ly/1s7U2Yb
-For bitcoin to succeed the community must police itself.
NotFuzzyWarm
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1932
Merit: 1327


Evil beware: We have waffles!


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 07:54:34 PM
Last edit: May 16, 2014, 09:08:01 PM by NotFuzzyWarm
 #1397

<snip>

The capacitors are there to mitigate against voltage spikes, but it is not entirely necessary.
Don't bet on it. At the clock frequencies the ASIC run at those spikes/dips can cause all kinds of havoc if not decoupled at the chip. Methinks that thinking is what got BM.ch into trouble in the first place. Power distribution at high switching speed loads is a very localized thing.

Okay... so if you think its a problem with switching speed... why don't we just plop in a slower oscillator?  You know,  just to see if it works.
You can underclock through software. ISAWHIM is more familiar with what range we have. But, won't help with this. We are concerned with the rise/fall times of the switching load - not its overall freq. It is a square wave so the transition times will be the same. If one has boards with the resistors in place of caps the only solution is to remove the resistors and put in caps.

For bitcoin to succeed the community must police itself - Joshua Zipkin aka Joshua Alexander leaked AMT A1 miner skype chats
How a miner mfgr SHOULD operate: HaggsFIN trip to Canaan My info useful? Donations welcome! 1Fuzzyk398kDWVjuC5qPX5v6CjSkvbgAbd
-Support Sidehacks miner development. Donations to:   1BURGERAXHH6Yi6LRybRJK7ybEm5m5HwTr
FrictionlessCoin
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 854
Merit: 1000


★YoBit.Net★ 1400+ Coins Exchange


View Profile
May 16, 2014, 09:06:56 PM
Last edit: May 16, 2014, 09:26:45 PM by FrictionlessCoin
 #1398

Here is the A2 board for Innosilicon that has the same electrical characteristics at the A1:



I don't see any large capacitors near the A2 chips.

I just realized one difference though,  notice that it is clustered 4 at a time.   This may be hinting at an issue that the SPI daisy chain should be max 4 in lenght and not 8 as in the original specs.


ISAWHIM
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 504
Merit: 500



View Profile
May 16, 2014, 11:14:40 PM
Last edit: May 16, 2014, 11:33:53 PM by ISAWHIM
 #1399

The COUT's connections are a mix of CAPs and Resistors, it seems. However, though the R+ labeled SMD seems to be a resistor, it has a polarity? Might be a cap/resistor combo. That, or the polarity indicator is just redundant. (This is on all my boards that function without issue. Except the one where the A1 chip is not mounted flush, and has thus, overheated.)

I suspect that the short across COUT46, by a screw from the fans, has just shorted the card, enough to keep it from initializing.

The board with the A1 that was not mounted flush, I assume had "shut down" due to the internal over-heating, once it had gotten to that point. In any event, the failure of that single chip, has led me to believe that the through-connections, the serial in/out on each chip, demands that the chips are chained. Failure of one, would, in some cases, stop the whole board from responding.

Removal of the chip, would seem to imply that a jumper be soldered, to bridge the through-connections, where they would normally be communicating "through the chip", to get to the other chips down the line. However, without the jumper, it seems like it should be possible to communicate with the chips up to that removed chip.

The work, I assume is coming in through the U8 chip, and returning back to the Ras-Pi, through the U5 serial linked chip. U8 is top-right, by the four other chips, I assume setting-up the distributed workload through U1, U2, U3, U4. The U5 chip is at the end of the serial connections from the chips, going directly back to the Ras-Pi, which is why I assume it is returning work/solutions/shares directly back, to be processed for diff-targets, to determine if they are solutions or just shares.

However, I could have that backwards too... U8 might be sending the work to the chips, and U5 may be the return of processed data. However, I am about 90% sure I have the previous paragraph correct this time. xD

The chips are sort-of isolated in groups of four, by two separate clock-timers or frequency controllers. Chips U60 and U61 are tied to four independent 1-wire connections, which are tied to a chip that has the clock-crystal.

All the circuits in the center, seem to be just the voltage regulation. Odd that they all seem to be built as individual regulation units. Might be why the new versions just made one whole power-regulator that was simply more robust, as opposed to 8 individual mini-regulators. There is power-isolation, as the chip on mine, which overheated, had a matching voltage-regulator which was also overheating.

I wanted to remove the caps and resistors from that board, which had the non-flush overheating A1 chip, and place them on the other board with the previously shorted connection... However, I had to craft a special soldering head to desolder the SMD components. That is taking longer than expected. lol. It was easier to do that, then to attempt to rework the non-flush A1, which I assume is actually burned-out and shorted inside anyways.

I am not sure how easy it would be to jumper/bridge the small connections for the data-lines... However, there are tiny inline (resistors or caps, can't read the numbers on them)... in the two center datalines, of the four. Not sure if that would impact the integrity of the data transfer. This is a question only AMT or BITMINE or TECHNOBIT can answer. Again, I don't have the schematics, and have not taken a strong look at the pinouts on the A1's in a while. I had no intentions to EVER get this deep into the design process.

The A2 board does have a few sets of caps and resistors, of a similar form-factor, just outside the heat-mounting area. There also seems to be a lot less micro-caps for filtering, directly around the chips. Roughly about half. However I do not see any crystal clock components... They may have settled for on-chip clock controls with self-oscillators. The controller chip also looks more like an ATMEGA-32 or ATMEGA-64, or a RISC processor. I would assume RISC, due to it being cheaper, and having more sister-components.

Ordered a new PSU for my computer, so I can rape the PSU from that, since it is way overpowered for my PC, but ideal to run the last two card with heat-sinks, that I have. Once I transfer the heat-sinks to the other cards that came without heatsinks. Should be here by tomorrow. Then, hopefully I will have almost 1GHs total. 580GHs + ~400GHs = ~980GHs (Not including errors, which, oddly are counted towards the GHs output, even though they were not valid, thus, not a hash. Makes determining the actual output a pain in the ass. Always says 580GHs, but when errors start, and get worse, the output is actually only about 480GHs in the pool. Just requires a reboot, and the errors go away for another day. xD The program needs a frequency tuning area. Though you SET a specific frequency, the output is not "calibrated", thus, it is ballpark. Sometimes you have to tell it a higher or lower frequency to operate, to be that actual frequency. That is how you tune cards. That is something that 7970's demand, in order to operate at ideal speeds. Not sure why that was just reduced to "Power-save", "Normal" and "Turbo"... Those should be user-settable. However, limited to the MFG MIN and MAX, for obvious reasons. xD, Guess I just gotta PuTTy to get it done. Tongue)
ISAWHIM
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 504
Merit: 500



View Profile
May 17, 2014, 12:00:15 AM
Last edit: May 17, 2014, 02:14:46 AM by ISAWHIM
 #1400

AMT, I suggest that you run these for a full 24-hours, after assembly... Not just each card on a bench-test... actual assembled units...

After you have given them a once-over, for quality control. Looking-out for those long screws, which seem to be drilling into one of the mounted boards. Also looking for backwards mounted fans. (All fans should be mounted so you DO NOT see the sticker on the fan.)

(Drill holes in a metal jig, and cut all the screws to length with a die-grinder or cut-off wheel... Even tin-snips! They are all waaay too long. Better yet, get nylon screws, or push-in clips... or use cheap "L" trim to hold all fans in place, mounted with velcro.)

Then, wait 2 hours, with the unit off... and power it back up, running it for another 24 hours. That allows the components to burn-in, settle-down, and any post-issues to crop-up. Issues that are seeming to crop-up after bench-testing, then assembling, then shipping.

Also, get a thermal imager. You can easily see the problem components, before they get out of control, on the bench. Just print a photo of a "normal view", and use that to compare the view in your imager. You can set that up with a simple assembly-line rig, and a cheap 300w PSU. You don't need a HD thermal imager like I have. Just a cheap $300 imager with a 20x40 screen would suffice, once mounted to a testing-slide. You can get decent used HD thermal imagers on ebay, for about $600. Mine cost over $3000. It was overkill for my purposes, but worth it.

The heat-sinks are adequate, with shrouding. Might want to invest in some cheap high-temp plastic (Thin lexan would work, and is cheap 155c melting temp.). Cover the holes in the back of the tower, where the cards are. That, or pull the shroud up to the heat-sinks on that side, so air comes IN through the holes, and is guided out to the big fan. Same for the front-side of the tower, and the side with the backplane. As it is now, hot air is just blowing all over inside the case, and some air is being sucked-in, from the back, and instantly pulled right out, by the larger fan on top.

A simple "U" shaped shroud. (I actually use cardboard) Wrapped around the three exposed sides, to create that air-guide/channel, helps dramatically, to ensure cool operation. Running at 780w, with only 3 cards, the exhaust on my unit is barely even warm. Though, the small copper heat-sinks are the hottest component, they are adequate, until they are not. Working on a spring-tension to place between the copper sinks, and the larger heat-sinks on the opposite side. (On the last card, where the copper sinks are exposed without a matching large heat-sink, to get pressure from... I am adding a metal plate as a shroud. That will keep better pressure against the copper, and allow some heat to dissipate through the spring-tension, which also increases the surface area.)

Other than that... These things get an A- grade in my book. Would have been an A if there was a power-switch, jumpered to the PSU connection, or a splice-kit switch, which splices to the power-ready line, so we can safely turn-off the power without power-cycling the PSU by removal of the plug. Since, not all PSU's have a separate power switch, and not all power switches operate at "Safe" levels, as they were intended for emergency power killing when the computers power button fails.

P.S. The large heat-sink is twice as large as it needs to be. The fins could be half the height, and the backplane junctions could be spaced a lot closer together, if that was done. Though, ribbon-connectors would have been better, to the cards. You could also reduce the airflow to six fans, for six cards. Not to mention, setting it up for two PSU's, you would save about 50% in PSU costs. Six cards can easily run off two 800W PSU's, instead of one 1500W PSU. There would be ample room for two PSU's, and that large fan would not be required at all. The PSU's could safely exhaust or be intakes, for 100% of the required air-flow. (Being intakes, would be preferred.) Once I get another heat-sink, I will build a unit as described, to show you. xD. Got a spare heat-sink?

LEXAN 1/32" * 24" * 48" = $10.00 in bulk (Might get down to $7.00) This is enough to do 4x units. That is roughly $2.50 a piece.

Anyone want me to make a shroud, let me know. I'll make them for $10.00 shipped. I won't be getting bulk prices, obviously. I'll be getting home-depot prices. lol.

EDIT: Screw that, Home-Depot charges $67.00 for a $10.00 sheet only 24" * 36"... What a rip-off. lol. I'll get them online. Found a nice seto of assorted springs for $5.00 that may work for adding tension to the copper heat-sinks. Looking for a better alternative, spring-steel "U" mounts.
Pages: « 1 ... 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 [70] 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 ... 160 »
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!