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Author Topic: [ANN] Spondoolies-Tech - carrier grade, data center ready mining rigs  (Read 1255316 times)
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ZiG
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April 20, 2014, 04:40:34 AM
 #1221

with 208v outlets usually for the AC, dryer, stove and water heater...
For those wondering about how one could get 208V in the USA:

208 =~ 120 * sqrt(3)

This is inter-phase voltage from a standard 3-phase circuit, in my notation from previous post it would be (A,B) or (B,C) or (C,A).

120V is the typical unloaded voltage from a modern single-phase circuit, which used to be specified as 110V according to the old electrical code.

Why am I writing this? To underscore that if somebody mixes 110V and 208V in a same sentence that person is most likely not qualified to give electrical advice. Qualified electricians would speak of 120/208 or maybe 110/190. This is minor nitpick, but in my experience it really correlates with those without proper qualifications.

ZiG at least was very open with that:
I am NOT an electrician either...

Edit: And again a link to more in-depth discussion: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity#Standardisation

Hey 2112,

Thanks for citing me twice in your post...but I don't understand exactly..."What is your problem...?" with my posting... Wink

Cheers,

ZiG
 
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April 20, 2014, 04:42:51 AM
 #1222

Nice story, but I don't know if I should believe a Newbie with one post.  Cheesy

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April 20, 2014, 05:47:49 AM
 #1223

Standard electrical power in the U.S. is delivered in two 110-120V legs, center-tap neutral grounded at the entry to the house.  Call the legs A and B, neutral N and ground G.  The voltage between A and B is 220-240 VAC, between A and N is 110-120 VAC, and between B and N 110-120 VAC.  Typically, stoves, clothes dryers and water heaters are 220-240V.  The rest of the house is split between the two legs, for 110-120V to each circuit.  Grounded circuits have been required since the late 1970's, so half of the circuits are A-N-G and the other half B-N-G.  For a 220-240V circuit, you need A-B-G.  For the SP10s I ordered, I installed NEMA 6-15 outlets with A-B-G so I can run them at 240V.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEMA_connector for details.  This is a routine job for an electrician, because NEMA 6-15 outlets are commonly used for air conditioners.  Local hardware stores carry NEMA 6-15 plugs, cords and outlets. A custom cord is required to plug an SP10 in that way.  240V is pretty dangerous, so use a licensed electrician and don't try it yourself unless you know what you are doing.

I am hoping that we will be able to use standard NEMA 6-15 power cords. These work for regular ATX power supplies running at 240V.

http://www.amazon.com/Apollo-Horticulture-240-Digital-Ballast/dp/B00EJVZLNC/

Edit: I also remember reading in some other thread about how some forum members did their own wiring and basically re-purposed NEMA 5-15/20 outlets for 240V so they can use regular 120V power cords. I think that this is just asking for trouble.

LOL please 5-15 and 6-15 are exactly the same electrically. The difference is the obvious physical slots to prevent mishap from plugging 120v devices into 240v circuit.

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April 20, 2014, 05:52:01 AM
 #1224

no computers are duty free to the usa.

I think it may depend on where they're coming from. That's why I'm asking.

It would surprise me if imports of this type of equipment from Israel were subject to an import duty, but you never know.


True, I've never received anything from Israel but I think the US would have especially lenient importation rules for Israel not more strict.  If anything China would be more difficult but so far, I've never had any issues with my multiple deliveries.
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April 20, 2014, 05:55:34 AM
 #1225

The commitment is only words. Saying "you can get a refund if it doesn't ship on time and on spec" IS only words if we judge by  what happened with all US fail companies. HashFail promised full BTC refunds and now they told DyslexicZombei that he didn't even purchased units from them when he sued them.

If they are going to reneg on the commitment (which I doubt), then it costs them even less. There is no legitimate reason not to make the commitment unless: 1) they aren't as sure the miners will ship on time and on spec as they claim to be, and 2) they believe they would stand behind the commitment if they made it. Draw your own conclusions.



Wait until the group buy deadline and then i will have an offer for you. I don't want to mix things up.

With relatively small team, I'm sure Spondoolies is looking for a future growth. The only way is to stay way above competitors and make a leap. SP30 is the answer.

I don't see you in the Group Buy yet Smiley
in case anyone has missed it....roadstress has setup a group buy for spoondoolies and it is a sick deal!!
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April 20, 2014, 06:00:03 AM
 #1226

fully ramped in after 12 hours, and i've never seen as stable a rig; 1.48TH/s at pool;



and 1.49TH/s in the UI;


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April 20, 2014, 06:09:47 AM
 #1227

Dude,
You can read this:)
http://www.spondoolies-tech.com/pages/team
Do not be amazed when job is done right from pros with passion and quality things happen Cheesy

Please help the Led Boy aka Bicknellski to make us a nice Christmas led tree and pay WASP membership fee here:
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=643999.msg7191563#msg7191563
And remember Bicknellski is not collecting money from community;D
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April 20, 2014, 06:15:14 AM
 #1228

Nice story, but I don't know if I should believe a Newbie with one post.  Cheesy

Pictures... proof etc.

That does go along way.

Dogie trust abuse, spam, bullying, conspiracy posts & insults to forum members. Ask the mods or admins to move Dogie's spam or off topic stalking posts to the link above.
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April 20, 2014, 06:22:57 AM
 #1229

Standard electrical power in the U.S. is delivered in two 110-120V legs, center-tap neutral grounded at the entry to the house.  Call the legs A and B, neutral N and ground G.  The voltage between A and B is 220-240 VAC, between A and N is 110-120 VAC, and between B and N 110-120 VAC.  Typically, stoves, clothes dryers and water heaters are 220-240V.  The rest of the house is split between the two legs, for 110-120V to each circuit.  Grounded circuits have been required since the late 1970's, so half of the circuits are A-N-G and the other half B-N-G.  For a 220-240V circuit, you need A-B-G.  For the SP10s I ordered, I installed NEMA 6-15 outlets with A-B-G so I can run them at 240V.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEMA_connector for details.  This is a routine job for an electrician, because NEMA 6-15 outlets are commonly used for air conditioners.  Local hardware stores carry NEMA 6-15 plugs, cords and outlets. A custom cord is required to plug an SP10 in that way.  240V is pretty dangerous, so use a licensed electrician and don't try it yourself unless you know what you are doing.

I am hoping that we will be able to use standard NEMA 6-15 power cords. These work for regular ATX power supplies running at 240V.

http://www.amazon.com/Apollo-Horticulture-240-Digital-Ballast/dp/B00EJVZLNC/

Edit: I also remember reading in some other thread about how some forum members did their own wiring and basically re-purposed NEMA 5-15/20 outlets for 240V so they can use regular 120V power cords. I think that this is just asking for trouble.

I took standard ATX power supply cords, cut the plugs off, and put on NEMA 6-15 plugs for use with a 240V outlet.  I didn't realize you could get them from Amazon, thanks Soros.  All I meant by custom cord is that presumably they ship U.S.-bound SP10's with 120V standard cords.  Very excited to get my SP10's!

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April 20, 2014, 06:28:58 AM
 #1230

Standard electrical power in the U.S. is delivered in two 110-120V legs, center-tap neutral grounded at the entry to the house.  Call the legs A and B, neutral N and ground G.  The voltage between A and B is 220-240 VAC, between A and N is 110-120 VAC, and between B and N 110-120 VAC.  Typically, stoves, clothes dryers and water heaters are 220-240V.  The rest of the house is split between the two legs, for 110-120V to each circuit.  Grounded circuits have been required since the late 1970's, so half of the circuits are A-N-G and the other half B-N-G.  For a 220-240V circuit, you need A-B-G.  For the SP10s I ordered, I installed NEMA 6-15 outlets with A-B-G so I can run them at 240V.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEMA_connector for details.  This is a routine job for an electrician, because NEMA 6-15 outlets are commonly used for air conditioners.  Local hardware stores carry NEMA 6-15 plugs, cords and outlets. A custom cord is required to plug an SP10 in that way.  240V is pretty dangerous, so use a licensed electrician and don't try it yourself unless you know what you are doing.

I am hoping that we will be able to use standard NEMA 6-15 power cords. These work for regular ATX power supplies running at 240V.

http://www.amazon.com/Apollo-Horticulture-240-Digital-Ballast/dp/B00EJVZLNC/

Edit: I also remember reading in some other thread about how some forum members did their own wiring and basically re-purposed NEMA 5-15/20 outlets for 240V so they can use regular 120V power cords. I think that this is just asking for trouble.

I took standard ATX power supply cords, cut the plugs off, and put on NEMA 6-15 plugs for use with a 240V outlet.  I didn't realize you could get them from Amazon, thanks Soros.  All I meant by custom cord is that presumably they ship U.S.-bound SP10's with 120V standard cords.  Very excited to get my SP10's!

Read my post earlier, just get the damn 5-15 receptacles. They're the same in term of conducting.

As long as you can make sure NO one ever touch those outlets. Just write a big ass " 220-240V ONLY".

Another thing to remember, its the Amperage that matters , not the Voltage so dont listen to someone who thinks 240V is too much for this wire or receptacle. In fact, for the same wattage, 240v use THINNER conductor (wires).

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April 20, 2014, 06:31:34 AM
 #1231

@raskul

Wow nice 5°C Temperature intake. Thats the whole magic behind pushing these chips to the max. Excellent cooling.

Most datacenters manage only 20-22°C. This shows that proper cooling on these high density rigs goes a long way.

It would be so cool (literally) if we (maybe with the help of spondoolies) get enough people together hosting miners in an iceland datacenter.



Bitfury did some research on these back in the FGPA days and i remember the guys (from thor datacenter, iceland?) stating that they could get the temperature in these cotainers to below 10°C,
simply setting them up in the cool iceland air and hooking up enough power.

Excellent cooling combined with cheap (even renewable) power really seems the way to go.

Also, not many datacenters can handle 30kw+ per rack, but this might be a solution.
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April 20, 2014, 06:34:41 AM
 #1232

@raskul

Wow nice 5°C Temperature intake. Thats the whole magic behind pushing these chips to the max. Excellent cooling.

Most datacenters manage only 20-22°C. This shows that proper cooling on these high density rigs goes a long way.



Those are air intake and exhaust temp. Nothing to do with the chips. Under ASIC stats you can see the chips temp. I hope Raskul cand post screenshot of that.
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April 20, 2014, 06:34:54 AM
 #1233

Iceland hosting is definitely a good idea - even the far north of Scotland would be a good idea (i'm 10 miles south of Edinburgh and all I do it put the rig on the windowsill at a slightly open window. This morning, we have frost (and most other mornings in the year - even height of summer).

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April 20, 2014, 06:38:25 AM
 #1234

I know this is intake temperature. It says so in the first sentence of the post...
But intake temperature automatically effects the cooling ability so naturally the chips run cooler at the same speed/power draw and will therefore clock faster.

Also, iceland offers 4ct/kwh electricity rates to their datacenters, fixed for 10 years, some of the lowest on the planet.

Ofcourse we won´t be getting that (+hosting cost +datacenter profit), but it should offer us some nice hosting with excellent cooling.
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April 20, 2014, 06:39:31 AM
 #1235

@raskul

Wow nice 5°C Temperature intake. Thats the whole magic behind pushing these chips to the max. Excellent cooling.

Most datacenters manage only 20-22°C. This shows that proper cooling on these high density rigs goes a long way.



Those are air intake and exhaust temp. Nothing to do with the chips. Under ASIC stats you can see the chips temp. I hope Raskul cand post screenshot of that.


for your peruse-ment good sir...




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April 20, 2014, 06:44:40 AM
 #1236

Nice, with mine, half of them show the maximum target temperature of 113° (crappy 25° temperature intake, changing datacenter soon).

Hopefully the next customer won´t throw his unit in the snow or the company´s deep freezing room, though i might pay for seeing an even higher hashrate Wink
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April 20, 2014, 06:47:59 AM
 #1237

Standard electrical power in the U.S. is delivered in two 110-120V legs, center-tap neutral grounded at the entry to the house.  Call the legs A and B, neutral N and ground G.  The voltage between A and B is 220-240 VAC, between A and N is 110-120 VAC, and between B and N 110-120 VAC.  Typically, stoves, clothes dryers and water heaters are 220-240V.  The rest of the house is split between the two legs, for 110-120V to each circuit.  Grounded circuits have been required since the late 1970's, so half of the circuits are A-N-G and the other half B-N-G.  For a 220-240V circuit, you need A-B-G.  For the SP10s I ordered, I installed NEMA 6-15 outlets with A-B-G so I can run them at 240V.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEMA_connector for details.  This is a routine job for an electrician, because NEMA 6-15 outlets are commonly used for air conditioners.  Local hardware stores carry NEMA 6-15 plugs, cords and outlets. A custom cord is required to plug an SP10 in that way.  240V is pretty dangerous, so use a licensed electrician and don't try it yourself unless you know what you are doing.

I am hoping that we will be able to use standard NEMA 6-15 power cords. These work for regular ATX power supplies running at 240V.

http://www.amazon.com/Apollo-Horticulture-240-Digital-Ballast/dp/B00EJVZLNC/

Edit: I also remember reading in some other thread about how some forum members did their own wiring and basically re-purposed NEMA 5-15/20 outlets for 240V so they can use regular 120V power cords. I think that this is just asking for trouble.

I took standard ATX power supply cords, cut the plugs off, and put on NEMA 6-15 plugs for use with a 240V outlet.  I didn't realize you could get them from Amazon, thanks Soros.  All I meant by custom cord is that presumably they ship U.S.-bound SP10's with 120V standard cords.  Very excited to get my SP10's!

Read my post earlier, just get the damn 5-15 receptacles. They're the same in term of conducting.

As long as you can make sure NO one ever touch those outlets. Just write a big ass " 220-240V ONLY".

Another thing to remember, its the Amperage that matters , not the Voltage so dont listen to someone who thinks 240V is too much for this wire or receptacle. In fact, for the same wattage, 240v use THINNER conductor (wires).



They carry the NEMA 6-15 wall sockets at my local hardware store.  Running 240V to a NEMA 5-15 receptacle is indeed electrically identical - BUT it is also a serious violation of the electrical code and would cause insurance problems in case of an electrical fire or some kind of accident.  Just spend the $9 for a NEMA-6 cord and $6 for a NEMA-6 outlet, and properly installed you are completely up to code.  I just wish I'd posted sooner, I didn't realize you could just buy a NEMA-6 power strip, so I installed three outlets instead of one.



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April 20, 2014, 07:23:58 AM
 #1238

Nice story, but I don't know if I should believe a Newbie with one post.  Cheesy

Thank you for your comment and I understand your skepticism but you will have to take my word for it. I know that’s a hard thing to understand by today’s standards, I’m sad to say. You won’t see me post much, never have before, anywhere for that matter. But if you think about it, if I had a bunch of posts, what would that prove anyway? I felt it was such a unique experience with a company I didn’t know much about and they for sure didn’t know me from anyone. That’s why I wanted to share my experience, I was that impressed with this company, I told them I would write about it and I kept my word to them.

~Blaise

Hey man, can you spare some Teeth - GQZ1mXzbsviarDAjgGeVTRB5GmjyMtFj5N
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April 20, 2014, 07:30:23 AM
 #1239

@Spondoolies-Tech, I realize I'm a little late, but would you like an additional review from a trusted community member? (I do escrows, and I help run a local exchange.)

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April 20, 2014, 07:40:17 AM
 #1240

Quote
We'll improve our web site. We're using Shopify e-commerce platform and it has it's limitation.
You friend can contact sales@spondoolies-tech.com and we'll create a custom order and BitPay link for him/her.

Thanks for your quick reply ... however, does this mean that once a product is ordered, a purchaser has no way of tracking its status?


He can always email us. info@, sales@ or support@
He does get email confirmations, etc
So, we did a bit of research. We'll enable user accounts at Shopify soon.

We've enabled user accounts in our web store. It's optional.
You can always email us, info@, sales@ or support@

New Mimblewimble implementation: https://www.beam.mw
Spondoolies is back with the SPx36: https://www.spondoolies-tech.com/products/spx36
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