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Author Topic: Economic Totalitarianism  (Read 345416 times)
generalizethis
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October 10, 2015, 01:12:12 PM
 #1641

Revelations:

 I had a blind Chihuahua who used to catch wind of my Rottweiler Bianca every time she was in heat. Old Dusty (that was his name) would hump the shit out of her leg for hours. She'd get bored, stand up, and off he fell. He'd find her again and start all over, but he never could get it quite right. God bless him for trying.

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October 10, 2015, 01:48:33 PM
 #1642

I DO NOT BELIEVE ANYTHING

This remark was made, in these very words, by John Gribbin, physics editor of New Scientist magazine, in a BBC-TV debate with Malcolm Muggeridge, and it provoked incredulity on the part of most viewers. It seems to be a hangover of the medieval Catholic era that causes most people, even the educated, to think that everybody must "believe" something or other, that if one is not a theist, one must be a dogmatic atheist, and if one does not think Capitalism is perfect, one must believe fervently in Socialism, and if one does not have blind faith in X, one must alternatively have blind faith in not-X or the reverse of X.

My own opinion is that belief is the death of intelligence. As soon as one believes a doctrine of any sort, or assumes certitude, one stops thinking about that aspect of existence. The more certitude one assumes, the less there is left to think about, and a person sure of everything would never have any need to think about anything and might be considered clinically dead under current medical standards, where absence of brain activity is taken to mean that life has ended.


Nice read. Dedicated to the ones that question everything.
http://www.rawilson.com/trigger1.html

Chaos could be a form of intelligence we cannot yet understand its complexity.
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October 10, 2015, 01:55:24 PM
 #1643

I DO NOT BELIEVE ANYTHING

This remark was made, in these very words, by John Gribbin, physics editor of New Scientist magazine, in a BBC-TV debate with Malcolm Muggeridge, and it provoked incredulity on the part of most viewers. It seems to be a hangover of the medieval Catholic era that causes most people, even the educated, to think that everybody must "believe" something or other, that if one is not a theist, one must be a dogmatic atheist, and if one does not think Capitalism is perfect, one must believe fervently in Socialism, and if one does not have blind faith in X, one must alternatively have blind faith in not-X or the reverse of X.

My own opinion is that belief is the death of intelligence. As soon as one believes a doctrine of any sort, or assumes certitude, one stops thinking about that aspect of existence. The more certitude one assumes, the less there is left to think about, and a person sure of everything would never have any need to think about anything and might be considered clinically dead under current medical standards, where absence of brain activity is taken to mean that life has ended.


Nice read. Dedicated to the ones that question everything.
http://www.rawilson.com/trigger1.html

 Smiley

"...there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so." Hamlet 2,2

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October 10, 2015, 08:33:57 PM
Last edit: October 10, 2015, 09:50:06 PM by TPTB_need_war
 #1644

Medical Totalitarianism

It is a crying shame that the clinical trials on this pathogen have not been done extensively because it could be a simple cure to so many chronic conditions (see list below) and the medical establishment would lose many profits. Being aware of this triple antibiotic + NAC therapy may be a simple way to cure yourself in the coming collapse of Western medical systems.

Also be aware that NAC has protective effects against all pathogens which may be critical in the coming pandemic as predicted by Armstrong's models.

Apparently chlamydia pneumoniae is implicated in a significant number of diseases that may just be autoimmune-like reactions to this chronic pathogen which is able to infect the macrophages and other key cells of the immune system.

http://www.cpnhelp.org/



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What makes Chlamydia Pneumoniae (Cpn) so troublesome

  • While it may start as a respiratory infection, Cpn can be carried to other parts of the body and infect many other tissues, including nerve tissue, the brain, muscles, the lining of blood vessels and even your immune cells (macrophages).
  • Standard single antibiotic courses (two weeks) only kill Cpn in one of its three life phases, leaving live forms of Cpn bacteria which are in other stages to renew infection.
  • Cpn contains at least two endotoxinsi (toxic chemicals) which cause tissue damage and inflammationi, chronic immune activation and toxic load in your body.
  • Cpn infects inside your cells and parasitically steals energy from your own body cells in order to replicate.
  • The only way to cure it is to take a combination of antibioticsi, to kill it in all of its life phases so nothing is left behind to re-infect.

http://www.cpnhelp.org/?q=simple

Quote
Cpn Simple- The shortest explanation we could think of!

  • Cpn has been clearly proven to have persistence in the body despite “standard” antibiotic treatment (two weeks of a single antibiotic).
  • Cpn has been implicated in a wide variety of diseases (see bottom of this page).
  • Blood tests and cultures are not reliable indicators of whether Cpn is part of your disease.
  • If you have any of the diseases in which Cpn has been implicated, it may be worth trying an “empirical” (based on symptoms alone) combination antibiotic protocol (Link).
  • Most doctors are not familiar with this, and you will have to present a rational and evidence based case to them for prescription of the appropriate antibiotics through information such as on this site.

Is this right for you?
 
Four indicators can be used to help you determine if an empirical test of the full combination antibiotic protocol is useful for you. You should be on it for for a minimum of 6 months to a year. The first three suggest that you have Cpn and you should continue this treatment.

1. You experience distinct reactions to the antibiotics indicative of Cpn die-off (see Reactions to Treatment link).
2. You have improvement of disease symptoms.
3. You have noticeable halting of symptom progression.
4. Nothing at all and decide this isn’t for you.




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What diseases has it been implicated in?

  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Asthma
  • Arthritis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Chronic refractory sinusitis
  • Cardiac disease
  • Interstitial cystitis
  • Prostatitis
  • Crohn's disease
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Alzheimer's disease

Additionally: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, uveitis, optic neuritis, radiculitis, nerve deafness, transverse myelitis, sarcoid, myocarditis, pericarditis, culture-negative endocarditis, atheromatous arterial disease, aneurysm, giant-cell (temporal) arteritis, polyarteritis nodosa, Wegener's granuloma, primary sclerosing cholangitis, reactive arthritis, Reiter's syndrome, Behcet's disease, cutaneous vasculitides including pyoderma gangrenosa. Wheldon adds: "Conditions which may suggest the possibility of flare-ups of chronic Chlamydia pneumoniae infection deserving serological investigation include the following — a multiplicity being more strongly suggestive: recurrent sinusitis, recurrent chest infections, chronic fatigue (especially if following a respiratory infection), focal neurological deficits, myalgia, muscle fasciculation's, recurrent episodes of bronchospasm, unexplained pleuritic pain, angina, recurrent arthralgia, unexplained recurrent abdominal pain, unexplained menorrhagia, recurrent fistula-in-ano, recurrent cutaneous vasculitides, achalasia, intestinal dysmotility."

It is is even implicated in atrial fibrillation (along with h.pylori which is the bacteria that put me in hospital in 2012 with acute peptic ulcer):

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16793213
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18163009
http://journals.lww.com/jcardiovascularmedicine/Citation/2009/01000/Helicobacter_pylori_and_atrial_fibrillation_.2.aspx


More evidence:

http://www.davidwheldon.co.uk/peer-review.html

Quote

The evidence for a causal association between a potentially treatable Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and majority subsets of Multiple Sclerosis, as detailed on the first page, is very strong. It is far stronger than hypothesis. Why, then, is this evidence almost unknown within the medical establishment? MS is often a devastating illness which usually strikes during the most productive years. It is the commonest neurological illness in young adults. No present treatment is anywhere near satisfactory, and, as the disease becomes progressive, present-day medicine has little to offer.

The problem is one of collation. A multitude of scientific studies - some of great elegance - can be linked together to support the causal association very powerfully, but this information has not been brought together in a broad, comprehensive manner within a widely-read multidisciplinary medical journal. The reason for this delay is the process by which scientific papers are selected for publication.

Editors must be selective. Scientific studies vary in their quality. No editor would wish to publish worthless material. At the same time no editor can be expected to possess the expertise necessary to evaluate the material he receives. One of the editorial staff will read the manuscript. If it is obviously poor then it will be filed in the basement and a polite note of rejection will be sent to the author. If it passes preliminary scrutiny as being reasonable and worthwhile, copies will be sent to two or three referees who are considered knowledgeable in the subject. The referees will read the manuscript and submit a report. This is the peer-review system, and is generally considered to be the least bad way of selecting scientific work for publication. Its advantages are that it can pick up sloppy or improbable work; work which places hypotheses upon hypotheses, or work which does not stand up to analysis.

It has drawbacks, though. The biggest drawback is that it resists any change to the underlying Weltanschauung [1] or 'mindset' on which the subject rests. The peers are senior establishment figures; their reputations are built solidly on a thesis of ideas which they share with each other. Thus it is that any work which casts doubt on the validity of the prevailing ethos is likely to be treated very harshly. Its principles are likely to be pulled to pieces in an unfair way; its findings, even when clear, are made to sound doubtful, and the argumentation in the discussion made to sound improbable. None of this is (one hopes) conscious. (A few days ago I happened to bring up this subject on meeting a friend in the hospital; she immediately took a copy of the Guardian from under her arm and said, 'you might like to have a look at this.' It was an article by Cordelia Fine. It is indeed apposite. I've put a few quotes at the bottom of the page.)

In the case in point the 'peers' are dedicated to the theory of inflammatory autoimmunity as the primary flywheel of the disease. They have made an enormous investment into this: years of their lives, ongoing research projects, academic reputations, lucrative connections to pharmaceutical companies eager to profit by expensive agents such as monoclonal antibodies. No-one is going to fund a large trial of out-of-patent antibiotics and unpatentable supplements. The establishment wishes that any idea of infection being at the root of MS would go away. That is why, if you study the literature, you'll find that negative studies [2] are given equal weight with studies that detected Chl pneumoniae in the CSF, and grew the organism and found specific antibodies [3]. Another (again one hopes) unconscious method of down-rating evidence which counters the established view is to side-line those who have made the positive discoveries. 'I know that Chlamydia pneumoniae has been found in the CSF of people with MS,' said a world-respected MS neurologist recently, 'but those early findings have never been repeated.' He is stating a half-truth, but only a half-truth.


Those early findings have indeed been repeated. There are, in fact, many good, worldwide, confirmatory studies which have detected Chl pneumoniae in the CSF of persons with with MS by culture or specific gene detection. Here is a précis.

The preliminary work was carried out by workers at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN in the US. 27 patients with MS and 27 patients with other neurological disease were studied. Polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated the presence of C pneumoniae MOMP gene in the CSF of 97% of MS patients versus 18% of patients with other neurological disease (OND) [3] The same workers isolated C pneumoniae from the CSF in 64% of MS patients and 11% of OND controls. 86% of MS patients had increased CSF antibodies to C pneumoniae elementary body antigens as shown by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay absorbance values that were 3 SD greater than those seen in OND controls. The specificity of this antibody response was confirmed by western blot assays of the CSF, using elementary body antigens. Moreover, CSF isoelectric focusing followed by western blot assays revealed cationic antibodies against C pneumoniae. The authors are careful to say that this gives evidence for but does not prove and aetiological link.

In 2000 Layh-Schmitt and colleagues in Heidelberg, Germany, reported the presence of Chl pneumoniae in 5 of 10 patients with MS using PCR. In a further study they detected the organism in 2 of 20 patients with MS, 3 of 17 patients with possible/probable MS and 0 of 56 patients with other neurological disease (OND) [4].

In 2001 Ikejima and colleagues, in the USA, reported the presence of Chl pneumoniae genes in the CSF of 11 of 16 patients with MS. These workers used a commercial kit rather than an in-house method [5].

Also in 2001 Geiffers and colleagues in Lubeck, Germany, detected Chl pneumoniae DNA in the CSF of 12 of 58 patients with MS and 20 of 47 patients with OND. However, Chl pneumoniae DNA was not detected in the CSF of any of 67 neurologically healthy persons. These authors conclude that Chl pneumoniae is probably a highly neurotropic pathogen [6.]

In 2002 Hao and colleagues, in Japan, reported the presence of Chl pneumoniae in 9 of 28 patients with MS and in 2 patients with inflammatory disease in 15 patients with OND. Elevated titres of specific antibody was found in the CSF of 42 of 84 patients with MS and in 28% of patients with OND [7.] [] Interestingly these workers observed a higher rate of Chl pneumoniae gene transcription in the patients with MS; this suggests a more active bacterial metabolism, and may point to host factors playing a part in the disease [7.]

In 2003 Grimaldi and colleagues, in Italy, detected Chl pneumoniae gene-sequences in the CSF of 23 of 107 patients with MS and 2 of 77 patients with OND [8].

In 2003 another study from the Heidelberg group detected the chlamydia-specific ompA gene in the CSF of 50% of patients with MS and in 28.1% of 89 OND patients [9.] In a most interesting further study, these authors found chlamydial HSP60-mRNA in the CSF of 75% of patients with MS, indicating active bacterial activity: chlamydiae are known to upregulate HSP60. This has the effect of preventing host cell apoptosis.

In 2002 a conjoint study of Chlamydia pneumoniae gene-sequences in the CSF was undertaken by workers at Vanderbilt University Medical Centre and the University of South Florida. The two laboratories used different DNA extraction and PCR techniques. In definite MS patients the detection rates were 72% (VUMC) and 61% (USF); in probable monosymptomatic patients the detection rates were 41 and 54% respectively; in OND controls the signal was positive in 7% and 16% respectively [10].

This repeated confirmation by different centres - using different methodology and targets - leaves little room for doubt about the association of Chl pneumoniae with MS. We have recently reviewed the evidence in some detail [11.]

Those who have read the above compilation will note, in the PCR findings within the CSF of persons with MS, a wide range of results, ranging from 10% to 97% positive signal. What is the cause of this diversity? Three possibilities might be considered: differences in methodology; geographical differences in strains; very small organism numbers. A very clear account of PCR in the detection of bacterial gene-sequences in the CSF is given by Yamamoto, who brings clarity to a difficult subject [12.] One of the most problematic issues, this paper says, is that of organism numbers. For one thing, Chl pneumoniae, under chronic stress conditions, drastically curtails EB production. Extracellular EB nucleic acids and proteins are thus likely to be present in minute quantities within the CSF, and, furthermore, are likely to be swept away very rapidly. The CSF is often considered to be a slow-moving - even sluggish - stream; this is not the case. The body of fluid is exchanged some three times in a 24 hour period; the volume of the CSF-containing cavities is about 150ml and approximately 500ml of CSF is produced every day. The anatomy of the CSF circulatory pathway is such that there are no 'dead spaces'. EBs will be quickly removed. The determination of positivity or negativity may well lie at the edge of chance; any slight advantage of methodology would be critical. It is possible that EB release may be intermittent. It will be noted that the positive reports are from centres round the world; little is known about geographical variation in the external proteins of the EB, or whether there are functional strain-differences; some strains might, for instance, produce more EBs than others while in the persistent state. An elucidation of the possible events which may happen in the course of persistent infective states with this organism will present one of the greatest challenges in medical microbiology in this century.

The information is present, but is not as yet collated. This is the reason why, if you want to stand a chance of recovery from MS, you will have to trawl through the millions of pages of journals listed in PubMed, using appropriate search terms: and when you find the material you will have to edit it to remove the establishment bias. Or else find someone who has done this for you and who has put the information on the Internet.

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October 10, 2015, 09:03:29 PM
Last edit: October 10, 2015, 10:32:21 PM by TPTB_need_war
 #1645

Revelations:

 I had a blind Chihuahua who used to catch wind of my Rottweiler Bianca every time she was in heat. Old Dusty (that was his name) would hump the shit out of her leg for hours. She'd get bored, stand up, and off he fell. He'd find her again and start all over, but he never could get it quite right. God bless him for trying.

And if the bastards who are perpetrating these crimes-against-humanity use the Bible as one of their guiding inspirations (or to help them manipulate those masses who do), it would behoove me to understand their guidebook.

You are so myopic and simple minded focused on hating the Bible that you lose information in the process as per the example above.

Did I potentially find the cure to my very perplexing illness by being closed minded?

Did I potentially find the solution of how to perfect crypto-currency and replace Bitcoin by being closed minded?

One day in the near future you will respect me.

Dedicated to the ones that question everything.

Exactly.

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October 10, 2015, 10:58:29 PM
 #1646

Revelations:

 I had a blind Chihuahua who used to catch wind of my Rottweiler Bianca every time she was in heat. Old Dusty (that was his name) would hump the shit out of her leg for hours. She'd get bored, stand up, and off he fell. He'd find her again and start all over, but he never could get it quite right. God bless him for trying.

And if the bastards who are perpetrating these crimes-against-humanity use the Bible as one of their guiding inspirations (or to help them manipulate those masses who do), it would behoove me to understand their guidebook.

You are so myopic and simple minded focused on hating the Bible that you lose information in the process as per the example above.

Did I potentially find the cure to my very perplexing illness by being closed minded?

Did I potentially find the solution of how to perfect crypto-currency and replace Bitcoin by being closed minded?

One day in the near future you will respect me.

Dedicated to the ones that question everything.

Exactly.

I love the Bible. Not sure what the other things have to do with you thinking you are the first one to figure Revelations out, but go on deluding yourself; you won't be the first or the last. Hump that leg.  Grin

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October 10, 2015, 11:11:25 PM
Last edit: October 10, 2015, 11:22:30 PM by TPTB_need_war
 #1647

Not sure what the other things have to do with you thinking you are the first one to figure Revelations out

Where did I claim that  Huh

, but go on deluding yourself; you won't be the first or the last. Hump that leg.  Grin

I thought I asked if we could graduate from being 5 year olds? Did you miss that post?

You are always fighting the last war when others have moved on?

You realize the last 3 posts from you in this thread (and the 2 that yours forced me to post thus 5 posts in total) have been useless noise. This is not helping the reader.

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October 10, 2015, 11:52:36 PM
Last edit: October 11, 2015, 12:21:42 AM by generalizethis
 #1648

Not sure what the other things have to do with you thinking you are the first one to figure Revelations out

Where did I claim that  Huh

, but go on deluding yourself; you won't be the first or the last. Hump that leg.  Grin

I thought I asked if we could graduate from being 5 year olds? Did you miss that post?

You are always fighting the last war when others have moved on?

You realize the last 3 posts from you in this thread (and the 2 that yours forced me to post thus 5 posts in total) have been useless noise. This is not helping the reader.

You can put me on ignore any time you want. And saying that I'm controlling your behavior by forcing you to post anything is weak.

You say you're perceptive, yet you can't figure out that I'm not taking the bait of your insults and will keep on point.

You say you're wise yet you think you are an expert in things you know little about (trying to interpret art and literature that every hack conspiracy theorist gravitates to because the work is vague enough to contort to whatever theory you are shilling if you really, really want it to--I'm surprised The Wizard of Oz hasn't made it onto the stage yet).

You say you're not a child, yet you blame me for your actions.

Just keep to what you know (and what i don't) and i won't post a competing view. It's really that simple.

And I'd like to add that I do respect you when it comes to computers and cryptocurrency as is evidenced in the earlier post about the best way to control your bitcoins made by another poster today. I know who to defer to and when. And you should comment on that post and make a direct difference in one man's liberty.

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October 11, 2015, 12:22:49 AM
 #1649

Fact: 9/11 was a pre-planned demolition job. Wrap your mind around the implications my man.

If instead you persist in going back to age 5, let me put it that age level mentality for you. I will point out that I could literally do the following at age 5 and I will welcome you to try to tackle me now because I can still do these moves:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKjfoQVssBo

Seriously. Want to try? Again I ask you where you were born and where would I find you in the USA if I come back for visit we can have a friendly test out on the grass field.

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October 11, 2015, 01:09:55 AM
Last edit: October 11, 2015, 01:35:32 AM by TPTB_need_war
 #1650

generalizethis,

You myopia is best explained with an analogy to my mother's reaction when I started to mention that Silverstein the owner of the lease on the World Trade Center had renegotiated his insurance in 2001 to include TOTAL destruction of the buildings by terrorists. Her reaction was, "that doesn't prove he was complicit, because everyone was worried about terrorists blowing up buildings". Even on those merits alone, she was totally off reality. Factor in that the pre-planned demolition is already proven, then there is no way you get the materials into the building without the owner of the lease likely being complicit.

This is about your level of intellect on the murals at the Denver airport. You are totally unaware of reality. You seem incapable of weighing the circumstances and all the surrounding facts. I am not going to rehash it again with you. It is a waste of both of our time. The fact that you are still holding a grudge about it, it is childish. Move on. If you really want to test egos, meet me on the football field. We can have a friendly game of physical contact (well I doubt you'll ever be able to touch me though).

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October 11, 2015, 01:10:42 AM
 #1651

Fact: 9/11 was a pre-planned demolition job. Wrap your mind around the implications my man.

If instead you persist in going back to age 5, let me put it that age level mentality for you. I will point out that I could literally do the following at age 5 and I will welcome you to try to tackle me now because I can still do these moves:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKjfoQVssBo

Seriously. Want to try? Again I ask you where you were born and where would I find you in the USA if I come back for visit we can have a friendly test out on the grass field.

What does 911 have to do with what I posted above? And why do you think you are Barry Sanders?

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October 11, 2015, 01:13:30 AM
 #1652

What does 911 have to do with what I posted above?

Precisely.

And why do you think you are Barry Sanders?

Meet me on the field and you will find out.

(you got me thinking. I bought a new pair of turf shoes a few years ago but never got to use them because of my illness. Would be wonderful to use them they are still new in the box. I think I'll be ready soon)

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October 11, 2015, 01:16:35 AM
Last edit: October 11, 2015, 01:37:01 AM by generalizethis
 #1653

generalizethis,

You myopia is best explained with an analogy to my mother's reaction when I started to mention that Siverstein the owner of the lease on the World Trade Center had renegotiated his lease in 2001 to include TOTAL destruction of the buildings by terrorists. Her reaction was, "that doesn't prove he was complicit, because everyone was worried about terrorists blowing up buildings".

This is about your level of intellect on the murals at the Denver airport. You are totally unaware of reality. You seem incapable of weighing the circumstances and all the surrounding facts. I am not going to rehash it again with you. It is a waste of both of our time. The fact that you are still holding a grudge about it, it is childish. Move on. If you really want to test egos, meet me on the football field. We can have a friendly game of physical contact.

I think you don't have any skills at interpreting art. Football, 911, your childhood, and egos is theater of distraction. Also, i prefer track or MMA. How about a decathlon followed by a three round fight? I'll even let you take a nap.

*Also your mom sounds like a wise woman--I'd add paying ten years of insurance on a building you plan on blowing up seems like bad finance. But I'm sure you'll wriggle it to fit your own myopia.  Wink

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October 11, 2015, 01:50:23 AM
Last edit: October 11, 2015, 02:02:24 AM by TPTB_need_war
 #1654

Also, i prefer track or MMA. How about a decathlon followed by a three round fight? I'll even let you take a nap.

But I don't get to have physical contact decathlon (meaning I can't slam into you full speed and get you to respect). I've never trained for a declathon and it would take much more time to get back into shape for that. The only reference points I have for the events of that are I ran 4:15 for the 1500 meters in high school (in the middle of the season before peaking so I could probably have gone faster but I tore my hamstring while sprinting a 330 in my senior year due to losing our coach and being overtrained on running up steep hills). I don't know what my 100 meter time is but I did 4.5 seconds for 40 yards in my early 20s. 400 meters I've run in the low-50s, but I never trained for that event so I could probably have gone faster (every time I ran it was really falling apart the last 100 meters). High jump I will suck as I am only 5'8" in shoes (69" wingspan only). I had a 36 - 40" vertical leap in my 20s but I have not had that lately due to being ill (26" just recently while very ill).

I don't have any experience at grappling, so MMA is not something I can reasonably compete in. I don't want to end up on the ground grappling because that isn't something that know how to do. It is a skill that takes time to master. Whereas, running full speed and slamming into you is something I love to do. If boxing, then maybe (no true experience but I seem to have some natural talent) but I have to risk that I only have one eye and I don't think it is worth it. I would wear goggles if we do a contact sport.

In any case, I offered football because it is a contact sport and I assume you are larger than me in height and weight and I wanted to give you an advantage because if we do MMA or boxing then we can't do it, because it is not reasonable if you are in a different weight class than me. In American football, all sized players have to play together.

Boxing if I can wear goggles, but I don't know if that even works. Never tried it. And if you are not more than 180 lbs. If you have any experience in boxing, I have none. But what the heck, I seem to like the sport. The main problem is the eye and the weight difference.

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October 11, 2015, 02:01:57 AM
Last edit: October 11, 2015, 02:21:21 AM by generalizethis
 #1655

Also, i prefer track or MMA. How about a decathlon followed by a three round fight? I'll even let you take a nap.

But I don't get to have physical contact decathlon. I've never trained for a declathon and it would take much more time to get back into shape for that. The only reference points I have for the events of that are I ran 4:15 for the 1500 meters in high school (in the middle of the season before peaking so I could probably have gone faster but I tore my hamstring while sprinting a 330 in my senior year due to losing our coach and being overtrained on running up steep hills). I don't know what my 100 meter time is but I did 4.5 seconds for 40 yards in my early 20s. 400 meters I've run in the low-50s, but I never trained for that event so I could probably have gone faster (every time I ran it was really falling apart the last 100 meters). High jump I will suck as I am only 5'8" in shoes. I had a 36 - 40" vertical leap in my 20s but I have not had that lately due to being ill (26" just recently while very ill).

I don't have any experience at grappling, so MMA is not something I can reasonably compete in. If boxing, then maybe (no true experience but I seem to have some natural talent) but I have to risk that I only have one eye and I don't think it is worth it. I would wear goggles if we do a contact sport.

In any case, I offered football because it is a contact sport and I assume you are larger than me in height and weight and I wanted to give you an advantage because if we do MMA or boxing then we can't do it, because it is not reasonable if you are in a different weight class than me. In American football, all sized players have to play together.

When Abraham Lincoln was challenged to a dual (the challenged gets to chose the weapon in a dual) the 6'4" book worm chose a broad sword for obvious reasons--the shorter challenger reneged for obvious reasons . MMA is my choice--it's mixed so it's Brazilian jujitsu, kick boxing and wrestling, plus a few other things like sambo, judo, and various forms of karate. You can't wear goggles when someone is punching you in the face--good chance of them breaking or getting smashed into your eye.

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October 11, 2015, 02:20:49 AM
 #1656

You can't wear goggles when someone is punching you in the face--good chance of them breaking or getting smashed into your eye.

Plexiglass can very strong. And goggles could be very big even covering most of the face. The problem is I think it either offers too much protection making the fight unfair, or it could break a bone on the face due to concentrating the pressure of punch where the goggles are resting on the face. We both agree it doesn't work, which is why I have never thought seriously about a comeback into sports at an old age as a boxer. I seem to have a talent for rapid fire combinations. My quickness is similar Manny Pacquaio but alas it is not meant to be for me to actually compete in the sport. Too late. Probably for the best.


MMA is my choice--it's mixed so it's Brazilian jujitsu, kick boxing and wrestling, plus a few other things like sambo, judo, and various forms of karate.

I am familiar with the techniques used inside the MMA ring. Boxing doesn't seem to be effective because the wrestlers just go for the legs and take you to the ground.

You are challenging me to a technically skilled sport where I have absolutely no training, so it wouldn't even be a contest. You might as well just ask me if I can give you a knife to stab me with. I am basically asking to have my arm or leg broken or dislocated. That would be insane. Of course I would simply have to fight dirty and break the rules in order to compete, so in a real life situation I would poke your eyes out, ram your nose up into your brain, etc, but then this wouldn't be friendly sport any more but rather survival.

So of course I will decline.

I was looking for a friendly afternoon on the field where I could teach you to have some respect for a 50 year old man. Bruise each other up a bit, but unlikely any serious injuries (although broken bones aren't totally impossible, the likelihood is much less than dislocation of an elbow in grappling). But since you imply you have no experience at grass field sports, then I guess we can't do it.

The decathlon would require far too much training on my part. Unless I was set on getting back into that shape any way, it would be a distraction. Football shape is something I would like to reattain any way, because it is a cross-training type of conditioning with explosiveness.

I suppose our only comparable sport would be boxing since I have no training and you have some capability to do that in an MMA. Or we could allow kicking also such as the Thai version of boxing. But again I would risk my eye and thus the rest of my productive life. Hardly seems worth it. If I could find some sort of head gear with a clear plexiglass over eye, and you want to fight for points (can't really hurt each other with headgear on), then that would be an interesting competition.

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October 11, 2015, 02:28:54 AM
 #1657

You can't wear goggles when someone is punching you in the face--good chance of them breaking or getting smashed into your eye.

Plexiglass can very strong. And goggles could be very big even covering most of the face. The problem is I think it either offers too much protection making the fight unfair, or it could break a bone on the face due to concentrating the pressure of punch where the goggles are resting on the face. We both agree it doesn't work, which is why I have never thought seriously about a comeback into sports at an old age as a boxer. I seem to have a talent for rapid fire combinations. My quickness is similar Manny Pacquaio but alas it is not meant to be for me to actually compete in the sport. Too late. Probably for the best.


MMA is my choice--it's mixed so it's Brazilian jujitsu, kick boxing and wrestling, plus a few other things like sambo, judo, and various forms of karate.

I am familiar with the techniques used inside the MMA ring. Boxing doesn't seem to be effective because the wrestlers just go for the legs and take you to the ground.

You are challenging me to a technically skilled sport where I have absolutely no training, so it wouldn't even be a contest. You might as well just ask me if I can give you a knife to stab me with. I am basically asking to have my arm or leg broken or dislocated. That would be insane. Of course I would simply have to fight dirty and break the rules in order to compete, so in a real life situation I would poke your eyes out, ram your nose up into your brain, etc, but then this wouldn't be friendly sport any more but rather survival.

So of course I will decline.

I was looking for a friendly afternoon on the field where I could teach you to have some respect for a 50 year old man. Bruise each other up a bit, but unlikely any serious injuries (although broken bones aren't totally impossible, the likelihood is much less than dislocation of an elbow in grappling). But since you say you have no experience at grass field sports, then I guess we can't do it.

The decathlon would require far too much training on my part. Unless I was set on getting back into that shape any way, it would be a distraction. Football shape is something I would like to reattain any way, because it is a cross-training type of conditioning with explosiveness.

I suppose our only comparable sport would be boxing since I have no training and you have some capability to do that in an MMA. Or we could allow kicking also such as the Thai version of boxing. But again I would risk my eye and thus the rest of my productive life. Hardly seems worth it. If I could find some sort of head gear with a clear plexiglass over eye, and you want to fight for points (can't really hurt each other with headgear on), then that would be an interesting competition.

Lets leave it at verbal sparring, agree to disagree, and call it a day.

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October 11, 2015, 02:48:45 AM
 #1658

this is so silly. we are wasting time. enough

this ends now. Bye.

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October 11, 2015, 03:40:36 AM
 #1659

wtf is going on in this thread ... I luv your brain mint, but man, the viscosity of your shit lately is stopping the flow of your message bro

get back to ION ... reading your crap is taking up a lot of my time lately (which is cool), but I'm not claiming to be coding up Satoshi2.0 ... how much time are you wasting writing all this stuff?

do more, write less .. your fan base is already established

set ya posting phaser to bullet points, put these other dudes on ignore (or better still kiss and make up with smooth and change the world)
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October 11, 2015, 06:57:37 AM
 #1660

http://www.dcclothesline.com/2015/10/07/matt-drudge-drops-bombshell-warning-in-surprise-interview-i-had-a-supreme-court-justice-say-to-me-its-over/
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