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Author Topic: Obyte: Totally new consensus algorithm + private untraceable payments  (Read 1168844 times)
Michail1
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November 15, 2017, 12:55:14 PM
 #15121

Do we have more distribution planned? I don't see next airdrop announced yet so just wondering...

And so far how much is distributed?

Nothing yet posted for the next distro.  Wonder if that is the cause of the rise?   Smiley

58.4% distributed prior to the Nov distro.   Stats haven't been updated yet.

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djpitagora
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November 15, 2017, 03:25:14 PM
 #15122

there 1024 MB=1GB and i not was sure if 1.000.000.000 bytes is 1 GB or 1.024.000.000 is 1GB.

I hate to pile on, but you are absolutely incorrect in your claim that there are 1024 MB in 1 GB. Relying on non-authoritative websites for your source of truth does nothing to resolve the error.

The SI system was devised ages ago, and is universally used as the measure of such things. The prefix G or giga always denotes 10^9.

Some time ago, lazy programmers noted that 2^10 is kinda sorta approximately equal 10^3. So they started sloppily referring to 2^10 as kilo, 2^20 as mega, etc. But this has introduced error and ambiguity where none is warranted. And this ambiguity has killed.

If you mean 2^30, then the proper prefix is Gi or gibi. The scientific and engineering standards communities are universally aligned on this point. Or to make it concrete for you, 1024 MiB = 1 GiB.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_prefix and while WikiPedia is only quasi-authoritative, they provide more explanation that truly authoritative sites such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology: https://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html

And for the love of all that is holy, stop misusing SI prefixes. Before they kill again.

I'd hate to rain down on your parade but in case of bytes, powers of two actually make sense. It was not lazy. Whoever later "decided" that 1 KB = 1000 bytes was a moron, whenever it's published on NIST or not. It's not used by anyone. Universities don't teach it that way. Your operating system (whenever if it's windows or linux) doesn't show it that way. 1 KB = 1000 bytes is only in the head of some senile bureaucrats that don't understand technology and memory alignment. Just because a bureaucrat says the earth is flat it doesn't mean it is. You can't wish it that way, just like you can't make a memory chip that holds exactly 1000 bytes of information. Bytes are stored in binary. That's the reality.
clovis A.
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November 15, 2017, 03:50:29 PM
 #15123

Super duper stoked about the wallet updates released over the weekend. The sync performance has been vastly improved and is doing wonders for my full client.  

I haven't been fully synced since mid September, but she's gaining ground rapidly now, thanks to the lastest update. Soon, I'll get to actually see the bytes and blackbytes from the November airdrop

Thanks for hooking us up, tonych!!

peace


I'm on v1.11.5 and my wallet just caught up to the point where the last distribution occurred, but then I got the "removing stable units" error. I see 1.11.5 was supposed to fix this error. Might there be another reason why I'm seeing this message? Any suggestions on how to rectify it?

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Cloud storage is about to change
                          Are you ready?
zanzibar
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November 15, 2017, 04:55:09 PM
 #15124



Because it's trustless, decentralized.

You do realize its uses changelly and changelly uses bittrex?
So if bittrex is down like we seen before changelly will not process anything? So what decentralize than?
And i have to admit , good to see this as addition but 0.75% is a bit salty. Beside if everyone knew that this uses changelly and changelly was saying about bittrex most people would go to bittrex for 1/3 of fee.cut the middle man.


No, I didn't Cry
bittathisbittathat
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November 15, 2017, 05:58:18 PM
 #15125

can you send blackbytes to someone else?

thx
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November 15, 2017, 06:54:00 PM
 #15126

can you send blackbytes to someone else?

thx

Yep. You have to peer your wallet with the other guy wallet then he asks your for a Blackbytes payment in the chat.

Byteball payment gateway for web merchants https://byteball-for-merchants.com/ - BEEB  (Blackbytes Exchange Bot): https://www.beeb-bot.com/ (closed)
Network map, stats, Top Richests and Byteball world map at https://byteball.fr/ (closed) - Hub operator featuring the cashback witness https://byteball-cashback-witness.com (closed)
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November 15, 2017, 07:47:52 PM
 #15127

WIll blackbyte be added to an exchange in the near future? Is anything planed like that? I would like to see it Wink

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November 15, 2017, 10:21:26 PM
 #15128

WIll blackbyte be added to an exchange in the near future? Is anything planed like that? I would like to see it Wink

I just used the Freebe bot in the wallet to trade blackbytes.  It worked as advertised.  There is a guide at http://freebe.byte-ball.com

I imagine the other bot works well to, it's just that this one I had an easier time figuring out.  While exchanges are great, it's nice to see a peer to peer solution!

Bitvest.io - Plinko Dice & More Gambling Site - Play/Invest - Amazing chat rewards!  Click now, thank me later!
Bitvest is a no?  Give Stake! a go! Good Luck!
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November 16, 2017, 01:29:02 AM
 #15129

I'd hate to rain down on your parade but in case of bytes, powers of two actually make sense. It was not lazy. Whoever later "decided" that 1 KB = 1000 bytes was a moron, whenever it's published on NIST or not. It's not used by anyone. Universities don't teach it that way. Your operating system (whenever if it's windows or linux) doesn't show it that way. 1 KB = 1000 bytes is only in the head of some senile bureaucrats that don't understand technology and memory alignment. Just because a bureaucrat says the earth is flat it doesn't mean it is. You can't wish it that way, just like you can't make a memory chip that holds exactly 1000 bytes of information. Bytes are stored in binary. That's the reality.
You could not be more wrong if you tried.

Kilo (K), Mega (M), Giga (G), Tera (T), etc. were powers of 10 long before they were lazily used as powers of two for devices that happen to address in binary, for example computer memory chips.

Kibi (Ki), Mebi (Mi), Gibi (Gi), Tebi (Ti) etc. are the accepted and internationally standardized prefixes for powers of 2.

Therefore 1 Kilobyte is 1000 bytes, 1 Kibibyte is 1024 bytes.  If you use 1 Kilobyte to say 1024 bytes you are wrong.

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November 16, 2017, 06:02:46 AM
 #15130




BEEB - Blackbytes Escrow Exchange Bot - Daily report.

TOTAL FOR SALE: 348 668 MBB   
Last 24h traded vol: 150 230 MBB   
Current Best Ask: 0.029 MB/MBB   
Current Best Ask vol: 113 MBB



Byteball payment gateway for web merchants https://byteball-for-merchants.com/ - BEEB  (Blackbytes Exchange Bot): https://www.beeb-bot.com/ (closed)
Network map, stats, Top Richests and Byteball world map at https://byteball.fr/ (closed) - Hub operator featuring the cashback witness https://byteball-cashback-witness.com (closed)
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November 16, 2017, 06:03:19 AM
 #15131


I'd hate to rain down on your parade but in case of bytes, powers of two actually make sense. It was not lazy. Whoever later "decided" that 1 KB = 1000 bytes was a moron, whenever it's published on NIST or not. It's not used by anyone. Universities don't teach it that way. Your operating system (whenever if it's windows or linux) doesn't show it that way. 1 KB = 1000 bytes is only in the head of some senile bureaucrats that don't understand technology and memory alignment. Just because a bureaucrat says the earth is flat it doesn't mean it is. You can't wish it that way, just like you can't make a memory chip that holds exactly 1000 bytes of information. Bytes are stored in binary. That's the reality.

Actually, while windows has always expressed sizes in powers of 2, I'm looking at a linux machine right now (xubuntu 16.04 specifically) which expresses them in powers of 10 and I remember it being this way for years, accross various distros

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November 16, 2017, 06:11:46 AM
 #15132


I'd hate to rain down on your parade but in case of bytes, powers of two actually make sense. It was not lazy. Whoever later "decided" that 1 KB = 1000 bytes was a moron, whenever it's published on NIST or not. It's not used by anyone. Universities don't teach it that way. Your operating system (whenever if it's windows or linux) doesn't show it that way. 1 KB = 1000 bytes is only in the head of some senile bureaucrats that don't understand technology and memory alignment. Just because a bureaucrat says the earth is flat it doesn't mean it is. You can't wish it that way, just like you can't make a memory chip that holds exactly 1000 bytes of information. Bytes are stored in binary. That's the reality.

Actually, while windows has always expressed sizes in powers of 2, I'm looking at a linux machine right now (xubuntu 16.04 specifically) which expresses them in powers of 10 and I remember it being this way for years, accross various distros

It's not a windows/linux thing, it's more of a hard disk/memory thing: 
https://superuser.com/questions/1080633/confusion-with-storage-capacity-powers-of-10-and-2
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November 16, 2017, 07:09:44 AM
 #15133

Byteball featured in BitcoinGarden’s newsletter

https://bitcoingarden.org/forum/index.php?topic=22314.0

Follow me on twitter for the latest news on bitcoin and altcoins and I'll follow you back the same day!
Obyte - An open cryptocurrency platform ready for real world adoption
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November 16, 2017, 07:18:06 AM
Last edit: November 16, 2017, 07:29:27 AM by jbreher
 #15134

in case of bytes, powers of two actually make sense.

Absolutely. And the scheme that I outline takes advantage of that happy mnemonic near-coincidence. Without any drawbacks. And eliminates the ambiguity that has led to fuckup after fuckup after fuckup after...

Quote
Whoever later "decided" that 1 KB = 1000 bytes was a moron

Nobody later decided that - the prefix 'k' or 'kilo' has denoted exactly 1000 since long before the dawn of logic-based computing.

Quote
It's not used by anyone.

It is used by every thinking person that values precision.

Quote
Universities don't teach it that way.

Universities absolutely teach the difference between 1000 and 1024, and the difference between metric powers-of-ten units and binary prefix powers-of-two units. Sure, there may be some backwaters that are still stuck in the eighties*, clinging to a misleading and imprecise anachronism. But by and large, the difference is known and taught - everywhere that values truth.

*Actually, I graduated with an Electrical Engineering degree in the eighties. And while we didn't yet have the convenient binary prefix notation back then, we were absolutely taught that misusing metric prefixes as an approximation was exactly that - an approximation. And not strictly correct. And to always be mindful of the error and ambiguity inserted due to this misuse.

Quote
Your operating system (whenever if it's windows or linux) doesn't show it that way.

Linux certainly knows how to report memory and disk capacities in KiB, MiB, GiB, TiB, ... Of course, if your favorite clownshoe hides the truth from you, don't put that on Linux - put it on your dumbed down distro. And don't talk to me about Windows as if it is some paragon of Vires in Numeris. Last time I bothered to look, Windows couldn't even agree with itself. What with it reporting a GB as (something like) 1024*1024*1000 in Disk Mangler and as 1024*1000*1000 in File Mangler. Or some equivalent comedy of hapless errors.

Quote
1 KB = 1000 bytes is only in the head of some senile bureaucrats that don't understand technology and memory alignment.

Hoo-boy. we got a live one here. I suppose you think NIST is ignorant on computing? ISO? IEEE? ACM? IETF?

Quote
Just because a bureaucrat says the earth is flat it doesn't mean it is.

Cool. You've said a second thing that isn't 100% wrong. But conversely, just because you say that 1000=1024 does not mean it is.

Quote
You can't wish it that way, just like you can't make a memory chip that holds exactly 1000 bytes of information.

This has exactly zero to do with the discussion at hand. However, this could be good for a couple of laughs. Please explain to me the physics behind your assertion that one cannot build a memory chip that holds exactly 1000 bytes of information. On second thought, don't. We don't need the fruitless diversion. Nor the ensuing hilarity.

So now that that is out of the way, let me try again. If we use the binary prefixes when we are speaking of 2^(10*n):
- we remove the ambiguity of not knowing if a measurement of (e.g.) 'M' means 1000000 or if it means 1,048,576 (or even 1,024,000);
- we lose none of the brevity of compact notation;
- we lose none of the mental chunking that comes from conveniently scaled units;
- we stop losing time and money due to fuckups in unit misunderstandings;
- we are using the units that all serious and conscientious scientists and engineers use;
- we stop killing people; and
- when the legacy Bitcoin max block size is 1MB, we know instantly it is 1,000,000 bytes, not 1000*1024 bytes, nor 1024*1024 bytes (guess what - 1,000,000 is exactly what it is - it is NOT 1,048,576)

Look, it's OK to be ignorant. There's no shame in that. I'm sure I am ignorant on any number of topics. However, to cling to a deprecated, failure-prone anachronism -- after being shown the error of your ways -- is downright foolish. And that is indeed shameful.

Stop misusing metric unit prefixes as approximations of binary powers-of-two. Before they kill again.

Anyone with a campaign ad in their signature -- for an organization with which they are not otherwise affiliated -- is automatically deducted credibility points.

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November 16, 2017, 07:19:05 AM
 #15135

Asset names are supposed to be assigned by trusted users/businesses called registries.  Any number of registries can exist, and each hub will have a list of registries it trusts.  Only names assigned by trusted registries will be broadcast to wallets connected to the hub.
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November 16, 2017, 08:15:04 AM
 #15136

A nice addition in our Bot Store.  Again, from an independent developer.

Byteball-Altcoin Exchange Bot

Exchange over 60 altcoins to Bytes, Bytes to altcoins, or altcoins to altcoins. Receive your coins as fast as the network confirms your transaction. The fee is only 0.75%.  Powered by Changelly.

Developer: Robert Huber, http://byteball-exchange-bot.com


Why should you use this? Fee at Bittrex is just 0.25% and you got a lot of ALTs there

Because it's trustless, decentralized.

Using changelly is certainly not trustless or decentralized. One reason to use it is to avoid registration and kyc requirements exchanges such as bittrex have, but you could do that by using changelly or shapeshift directly as well.

Another reason is convenience, usually people do choose the convenient fast and easy way even if it's more expensive. You could lower the fee to 0.4 0.5 to stay competitive but I still think it's a good idea as is.

If it saves you time and hassle you wouldn't mind a higher fees which for little amounts would be irrilevant. Moreover, if you want to change bytes with some specific alts on an exchange you would probably have to go a double change, passing through BTC or ETH or whatever major market, which would anyway double the fees. Plus add transfer fees. So this new bot is super-welcome.

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November 16, 2017, 02:17:08 PM
 #15137

in case of bytes, powers of two actually make sense.

Absolutely. And the scheme that I outline takes advantage of that happy mnemonic near-coincidence. Without any drawbacks. And eliminates the ambiguity that has led to fuckup after fuckup after fuckup after...

Quote
Whoever later "decided" that 1 KB = 1000 bytes was a moron

Nobody later decided that - the prefix 'k' or 'kilo' has denoted exactly 1000 since long before the dawn of logic-based computing.

Quote
It's not used by anyone.

It is used by every thinking person that values precision.

Quote
Universities don't teach it that way.


Universities absolutely teach the difference between 1000 and 1024, and the difference between metric powers-of-ten units and binary prefix powers-of-two units. Sure, there may be some backwaters that are still stuck in the eighties*, clinging to a misleading and imprecise anachronism. But by and large, the difference is known and taught - everywhere that values truth.

*Actually, I graduated with an Electrical Engineering degree in the eighties. And while we didn't yet have the convenient binary prefix notation back then, we were absolutely taught that misusing metric prefixes as an approximation was exactly that - an approximation. And not strictly correct. And to always be mindful of the error and ambiguity inserted due to this misuse.

Quote
Your operating system (whenever if it's windows or linux) doesn't show it that way.

Linux certainly knows how to report memory and disk capacities in KiB, MiB, GiB, TiB, ... Of course, if your favorite clownshoe hides the truth from you, don't put that on Linux - put it on your dumbed down distro. And don't talk to me about Windows as if it is some paragon of Vires in Numeris. Last time I bothered to look, Windows couldn't even agree with itself. What with it reporting a GB as (something like) 1024*1024*1000 in Disk Mangler and as 1024*1000*1000 in File Mangler. Or some equivalent comedy of hapless errors.

Quote
1 KB = 1000 bytes is only in the head of some senile bureaucrats that don't understand technology and memory alignment.

Hoo-boy. we got a live one here. I suppose you think NIST is ignorant on computing? ISO? IEEE? ACM? IETF?

Quote
Just because a bureaucrat says the earth is flat it doesn't mean it is.

Cool. You've said a second thing that isn't 100% wrong. But conversely, just because you say that 1000=1024 does not mean it is.

Quote
You can't wish it that way, just like you can't make a memory chip that holds exactly 1000 bytes of information.

This has exactly zero to do with the discussion at hand. However, this could be good for a couple of laughs. Please explain to me the physics behind your assertion that one cannot build a memory chip that holds exactly 1000 bytes of information. On second thought, don't. We don't need the fruitless diversion. Nor the ensuing hilarity.

So now that that is out of the way, let me try again. If we use the binary prefixes when we are speaking of 2^(10*n):
- we remove the ambiguity of not knowing if a measurement of (e.g.) 'M' means 1000000 or if it means 1,048,576 (or even 1,024,000);
- we lose none of the brevity of compact notation;
- we lose none of the mental chunking that comes from conveniently scaled units;
- we stop losing time and money due to fuckups in unit misunderstandings;
- we are using the units that all serious and conscientious scientists and engineers use;
- we stop killing people; and
- when the legacy Bitcoin max block size is 1MB, we know instantly it is 1,000,000 bytes, not 1000*1024 bytes, nor 1024*1024 bytes (guess what - 1,000,000 is exactly what it is - it is NOT 1,048,576)

Look, it's OK to be ignorant. There's no shame in that. I'm sure I am ignorant on any number of topics. However, to cling to a deprecated, failure-prone anachronism -- after being shown the error of your ways -- is downright foolish. And that is indeed shameful.

Stop misusing metric unit prefixes as approximations of binary powers-of-two. Before they kill again.

Wow, this have been very exhausting and I like it. 1 KB = 1000 byte is the simplest and for classic future coin users the best to understand. Everything else seems to me useless. For the IT guys maybe it would be better, but for classic user not. And I think all of us want to see Byteball with as many users as is possible and with the price on high which this coin deserves...not like now, which is ridiculous.
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November 16, 2017, 02:39:24 PM
 #15138

Freebe Blackbyte Exchange Report

Lots of new traders joined the Blackbyte Market lately. New constant volume and a good price increase (0.03 -> 0.04) gives a very good feeling about the blackbyte market development!

  • 24h volume: 1065 GBB
  • Last trade: 9 GBB at: 0.0379

  • Best Ask: 0.04 (50 GBB)
  • Best Bid: 0.0402 (0.99 GBB)
  • Total GBB wanted: 5993
  • Total GBB for sell: 714

  • Total volume all time: 64113 GBB
  • Total successful trades: 1041



Partially traiding enabled! Instantly sell any amount of Blackbytes at the best marketprice.

Just type: sell <amount> <your address> for example: sell 1.45g QUVOQQRO42BWCUG7VH2G6W6CWFKTGGI4. For the amount you can use any unit, such as "g", "m" or "k".

More help, information and live data available at: http://freebe.byte-ball.com






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November 16, 2017, 04:45:17 PM
 #15139

Now, we still have 0 trusted registries on the default hub byteball.org and the assets in the wallets are still cryptic hashes.  My proposal is that we elect 1 or 2 registries to start with.  We already have a poll bot and can put it to use here.  If this sounds like a good idea, let's start with nominations.

I would like to candidate to become registrar. I got some ideas for features to be built on top this service, I need a few days to define and present the project.

Which are the tecnical requirements and procedures to become a registrar? Are we moving in uncharted territories or are there already precise procedures and instruments set for that?

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November 16, 2017, 07:00:32 PM
 #15140



BEEB - Blackbytes Escrow Exchange Bot - Daily report.

TOTAL FOR SALE: 283 048 MBB   
Last 24h traded vol: 234 030 MBB   
Current Best Ask: 0.0282 MB/MBB   
Current Best Ask vol: 40 MBB
Last price: 0.0399 MB/MBB
Last vol: 3 000 MBB



Byteball payment gateway for web merchants https://byteball-for-merchants.com/ - BEEB  (Blackbytes Exchange Bot): https://www.beeb-bot.com/ (closed)
Network map, stats, Top Richests and Byteball world map at https://byteball.fr/ (closed) - Hub operator featuring the cashback witness https://byteball-cashback-witness.com (closed)
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