Bitcoin Forum
December 07, 2016, 02:51:14 PM *
News: To be able to use the next phase of the beta forum software, please ensure that your email address is correct/functional.
 
   Home   Help Search Donate Login Register  
Pages: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 [9] 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 ... 80 »
  Print  
Author Topic: BAMT version 0.5 - Easy USB based mining Linux with farm wide management tools  (Read 302813 times)
lodcrappo
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 588


View Profile WWW
February 28, 2012, 08:25:24 PM
 #161

How can I set a static ip addres?

The smart way: create a reservation with your DHCP server

The hard way: click the network thingy on the desktop, lower right corner.  Edit Connections.  Edit your connection as desired.  Save.

If you want to support further development of BAMT (http://bamter.org/):  1PoRYaGS56ksQmK7XXLurW3B2zwCAE8PRc
1481122274
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481122274

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481122274
Reply with quote  #2

1481122274
Report to moderator
1481122274
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481122274

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481122274
Reply with quote  #2

1481122274
Report to moderator
1481122274
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481122274

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481122274
Reply with quote  #2

1481122274
Report to moderator
Advertised sites are not endorsed by the Bitcoin Forum. They may be unsafe, untrustworthy, or illegal in your jurisdiction. Advertise here.
1481122274
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481122274

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481122274
Reply with quote  #2

1481122274
Report to moderator
1481122274
Hero Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481122274

View Profile Personal Message (Offline)

Ignore
1481122274
Reply with quote  #2

1481122274
Report to moderator
DeathAndTaxes
Donator
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1218


Gerald Davis


View Profile
February 28, 2012, 08:57:01 PM
 #162

How can I set a static ip addres?

The smart way: create a reservation with your DHCP server

The hard way: click the network thingy on the desktop, lower right corner.  Edit Connections.  Edit your connection as desired.  Save.


This.  Why do people want to do it the hard way?  Today a $29.99 generic router can do DHCP reservations.  

Hell most enterprises today just use DHCP reservations for hundreds of thousands of PCs.  You plug the PC in and it always get the exact same IP address forever without any configuration.
lodcrappo
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 588


View Profile WWW
February 29, 2012, 03:54:50 AM
 #163

So, I haven't been worrying about this thread so much, just been announcing updates on the support website.
But, in case anyone isn't paying attention, in the past day or two:

Fix 4
Fixes problem with sending email alerts

Fix 5
Fix for "No protocol specified" error

Fix 6
fixes mining not started at boot, adds logging

Fix 7
add support for bitforce singles

Fix 8
Phoenix2 support





If you want to support further development of BAMT (http://bamter.org/):  1PoRYaGS56ksQmK7XXLurW3B2zwCAE8PRc
boozer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 309


View Profile
February 29, 2012, 04:05:54 AM
 #164


Hell most enterprises today just use DHCP reservations for hundreds of thousands of PCs.  You plug the PC in and it always get the exact same IP address forever without any configuration.

Most enterprises utilize DHCP with 1 day (or more) lease periods, but I have not seen an enterprise lease DHCP to a computer forever (except printers/servers, etc), that would just chew up hundreds of thousands of IP's over time as laptop/desktop refreshes occurred and would just be headache from the network perspective unless you continually expanded (or started with a huge) subnet.... either way, it would be very inefficient with IPv4.  With a lease time of 3 days or a week, then as long as you plug in once a week, you get the same IP, but if your are out longer than that then you would get a new IP.  However, you can prove me wrong, if you go in to the network details of an interface and it says the "lease expires" date is never, or several years out then that basically would be forever.

Once IPv6 becomes mainstream, then it wont be an issue, i could very well see have the same address forever.

However, I got completely sidetracked and off topic (sorry)  Smiley 

My original question is....  I have my wireless card working in BAMT... but it loses the network key on each reboot... anyway to make the key static?  I tried wpasupplicant listed here:

http://wiki.debian.org/DebianEeePC/HowTo/Wifi

But that seems to have no effect.  Any suggestions?

Joshwaa
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 489



View Profile
February 29, 2012, 04:11:43 AM
 #165

Watching thanks! Shocked

Like what I said : 1JosHWaA2GywdZo9pmGLNJ5XSt8j7nzNiF
Don't like what I said : 1FuckU1u89U9nBKQu4rCHz16uF4RhpSTV
Don't Like BFL's Project Management : 1FuckbFLZpmWLuyHyFJw1RGkWm3yRM1L5D
lodcrappo
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 588


View Profile WWW
February 29, 2012, 04:21:12 AM
 #166


Hell most enterprises today just use DHCP reservations for hundreds of thousands of PCs.  You plug the PC in and it always get the exact same IP address forever without any configuration.

Most enterprises utilize DHCP with 1 day (or more) lease periods, but I have not seen an enterprise lease DHCP to a computer forever (except printers/servers, etc), that would just chew up hundreds of thousands of IP's over time as laptop/desktop refreshes occurred and would just be headache from the network perspective unless you continually expanded (or started with a huge) subnet.... either way, it would be very inefficient with IPv4.  With a lease time of 3 days or a week, then as long as you plug in once a week, you get the same IP, but if your are out longer than that then you would get a new IP.  However, you can prove me wrong, if you go in to the network details of an interface and it says the "lease expires" date is never, or several years out then that basically would be forever.

Once IPv6 becomes mainstream, then it wont be an issue, i could very well see have the same address forever.

However, I got completely sidetracked and off topic (sorry)  Smiley  

My original question is....  I have my wireless card working in BAMT... but it loses the network key on each reboot... anyway to make the key static?  I tried wpasupplicant listed here:

http://wiki.debian.org/DebianEeePC/HowTo/Wifi

But that seems to have no effect.  Any suggestions?



FWIW, many larger networks do use very long leases (months).  This reduces traffic and effectively gives almost everything a static IP.  If you are wise, you always under allocate your IPv4 space massively with DHCP, for instance you should always have at least as much completely free space as allocated in case you need to switch out dhcp servers etc.  

to save the wireless key, click on the network thing in right hand corner.  edit your connection to taste. save it.


If you want to support further development of BAMT (http://bamter.org/):  1PoRYaGS56ksQmK7XXLurW3B2zwCAE8PRc
DeathAndTaxes
Donator
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1218


Gerald Davis


View Profile
February 29, 2012, 05:04:34 AM
 #167

However, you can prove me wrong, if you go in to the network details of an interface and it says the "lease expires" date is never, or several years out then that basically would be forever.

blah blah blah ... I don't understand ... blah blah blah ...

Read up on DHCP RESERVATION no need for the expire date to be forever, no need to even give it a specific expire timeframe.  

You assign IP address of 192.168.0.20 to a rig in the router (not the rig).  
When it expires it gets a "new" IP address by DHCP from the router.  guess what the new IP address is ... 192.168.0.20.  
Next expiration ... 192.168.0.20.  
You install new flash drive w/ latest version of BAMT (no config files set) what IP address is the rig on ... 192.168.0.20
50,000 expiration later ... 192.168.0.20.  
Shortly before the sun burns out ... 129.168.0.20.

lodcrappo
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 588


View Profile WWW
February 29, 2012, 05:16:40 AM
 #168

However, you can prove me wrong, if you go in to the network details of an interface and it says the "lease expires" date is never, or several years out then that basically would be forever.

blah blah blah ... I don't understand ... blah blah blah ...

Read up on DHCP RESERVATION no need for the expire date to be forever, no need to even give it a specific expire timeframe.  

You assign IP address of 192.168.0.20 to a rig in the router (not the rig).  
When it expires it gets a "new" IP address by DHCP from the router.  guess what the new IP address is ... 192.168.0.20.  
Next expiration ... 192.168.0.20.  
You install new flash drive w/ latest version of BAMT (no config files set) what IP address is the rig on ... 192.168.0.20
50,000 expiration later ... 192.168.0.20.  
Shortly before the sun burns out ... 129.168.0.20.



Yes this is a good point.  Reservations is not a lease.  Two different things.  Reservation is for exactly this scenario.  Much preferred to setting static addresses all over the place.  Set reservations in one central place = same thing, much easier to manage.

If you want to support further development of BAMT (http://bamter.org/):  1PoRYaGS56ksQmK7XXLurW3B2zwCAE8PRc
boozer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 309


View Profile
February 29, 2012, 05:19:39 AM
 #169


FWIW, many larger networks do use very long leases (months).  This reduces traffic and effectively gives almost everything a static IP.  If you are wise, you always under allocate your IPv4 space massively with DHCP, for instance you should always have at least as much completely free space as allocated in case you need to switch out dhcp servers etc.  

to save the wireless key, click on the network thing in right hand corner.  edit your connection to taste. save it.


Hmmm, Microsoft recommends  16-24 days for large static environments, i've never seen lease times of months, and they only recommend that if   "client computers generally remain in fixed locations and scope addresses are plentiful (at least 20 percent or more of the addresses are still available)."

Months would probably be fine for a larged fixed environment, but all the environments I support are become much less static and more mobile. Most users have laptops, smartphones, and possibly tablets, that are by no means fixed.  They roam from site to site.  Desktops are quickly decreasing, while laptops are quickly increasing.  Plus in large sites if you are trying to limit your broadcast domains to 500 or 1000 users, they can easily push up against this limit requiring much shorter lease times.... I dont know how large of an environment your talking about.. mine is just over 20,000 ports.  But I can see it varying greatly on circumstance.... the famous line of "it depends"  Smiley  But I must plead ignorance as I am silohed in the network side and dont manage DHCP at all Smiley


In BAMT, I set the network key, hit apply, get connected, but when I reboot its gone, or if I bring up the network manager again its gone (even though I'm currently connected).

Love BAMT by the way, I had to do some modifications to get my cheap refurb Linksys WUSB100 wireless adapters to work, so maybe I broke something doing that.  By save, if you mean "apply"... I do that, but it still seems to be sent to /null  Cheesy
boozer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 309


View Profile
February 29, 2012, 05:21:27 AM
 #170

However, you can prove me wrong, if you go in to the network details of an interface and it says the "lease expires" date is never, or several years out then that basically would be forever.

blah blah blah ... I don't understand ... blah blah blah ...

Read up on DHCP RESERVATION no need for the expire date to be forever, no need to even give it a specific expire timeframe.  

You assign IP address of 192.168.0.20 to a rig in the router (not the rig).  
When it expires it gets a "new" IP address by DHCP from the router.  guess what the new IP address is ... 192.168.0.20.  
Next expiration ... 192.168.0.20.  
You install new flash drive w/ latest version of BAMT (no config files set) what IP address is the rig on ... 192.168.0.20
50,000 expiration later ... 192.168.0.20.  
Shortly before the sun burns out ... 129.168.0.20.



Yes this is a good point.  Reservations is not a lease.  Two different things.  Reservation is for exactly this scenario.  Much preferred to setting static addresses all over the place.  Set reservations in one central place = same thing, much easier to manage.

Yea, I was just stating that for large environments to make reservations for thousands of IP addresses would be a pain.... I think we all are talking about the same thing, just different environments where it.... "it depends" Smiley

D&T, I very well understand reservations, and they work fine in small environments, or for printers etc... but not for large environments of thousands of people.... if you do semi-regular laptop/desktop refreshes, then that means you would have to touch the DHCP server for every single laptop or PC refresh since reservations are based on MAC address which will change with each new computer... You can say "blah blah blah ... I don't understand ... blah blah blah ... " but I think I understand it very well... static DHCP reservations for each computer in an enterprise environment is simply not scalable... or it is if you want to touch each DHCP server every time someone gets a new PC or moves from site to site, but you wont find that in any enterprise environment of 100,000+ people.
lodcrappo
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 588


View Profile WWW
February 29, 2012, 06:15:00 AM
 #171


FWIW, many larger networks do use very long leases (months).  This reduces traffic and effectively gives almost everything a static IP.  If you are wise, you always under allocate your IPv4 space massively with DHCP, for instance you should always have at least as much completely free space as allocated in case you need to switch out dhcp servers etc.  

to save the wireless key, click on the network thing in right hand corner.  edit your connection to taste. save it.


Hmmm, Microsoft recommends  16-24 days for large static environments, i've never seen lease times of months, and they only recommend that if   "client computers generally remain in fixed locations and scope addresses are plentiful (at least 20 percent or more of the addresses are still available)."

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc783573(v=ws.10).aspx

"In a more stable environment, you can use a long lease, such as several months. This ensures both that addresses are ultimately recovered, and that DHCP-related network traffic is kept to a minimum."

In BAMT, I set the network key, hit apply, get connected, but when I reboot its gone, or if I bring up the network manager again its gone (even though I'm currently connected).

Love BAMT by the way, I had to do some modifications to get my cheap refurb Linksys WUSB100 wireless adapters to work, so maybe I broke something doing that.  By save, if you mean "apply"... I do that, but it still seems to be sent to /null  Cheesy


I do not know what you mean by "modifications" so I cannot speculate on their effects.  Things works fine for me here on the one machine and one wireless adapter I use.  It's the standard network manager found in tons of other Linuxes, should be fairly cut and dry. that's all I can say.
 

If you want to support further development of BAMT (http://bamter.org/):  1PoRYaGS56ksQmK7XXLurW3B2zwCAE8PRc
lodcrappo
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 588


View Profile WWW
February 29, 2012, 06:21:20 AM
 #172



Yea, I was just stating that for large environments to make reservations for thousands of IP addresses would be a pain.... I think we all are talking about the same thing, just different environments where it.... "it depends" Smiley

D&T, I very well understand reservations, and they work fine in small environments, or for printers etc... but not for large environments of thousands of people.... if you do semi-regular laptop/desktop refreshes, then that means you would have to touch the DHCP server for every single laptop or PC refresh since reservations are based on MAC address which will change with each new computer... You can say "blah blah blah ... I don't understand ... blah blah blah ... " but I think I understand it very well... static DHCP reservations for each computer in an enterprise environment is simply not scalable... or it is if you want to touch each DHCP server every time someone gets a new PC or moves from site to site, but you wont find that in any enterprise environment of 100,000+ people.

This entire line of conversation is bizarre.

The guy wants a static IP.  For a miner.  Not for the west coast division of megaco.

There are 2 options:  manually configure this on every box, or make reservations in a central console.

Reservations is a better way to do it.

The end.  Whether you are on a small home network or a massive corporate network, if you want static IPs, it makes complete sense to do it centrally.  Going around and manually configuring thousands of PCs makes no more sense than manually configuring a handful.  Its just silly no matter what.


If you want to support further development of BAMT (http://bamter.org/):  1PoRYaGS56ksQmK7XXLurW3B2zwCAE8PRc
RoloTonyBrownTown
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 350



View Profile
February 29, 2012, 06:25:32 AM
 #173

Just bought a RaspberryPi so I'll be keen to give this a crack on it when it finally arrives

boozer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 309


View Profile
February 29, 2012, 06:38:14 AM
 #174



Yea, I was just stating that for large environments to make reservations for thousands of IP addresses would be a pain.... I think we all are talking about the same thing, just different environments where it.... "it depends" Smiley

D&T, I very well understand reservations, and they work fine in small environments, or for printers etc... but not for large environments of thousands of people.... if you do semi-regular laptop/desktop refreshes, then that means you would have to touch the DHCP server for every single laptop or PC refresh since reservations are based on MAC address which will change with each new computer... You can say "blah blah blah ... I don't understand ... blah blah blah ... " but I think I understand it very well... static DHCP reservations for each computer in an enterprise environment is simply not scalable... or it is if you want to touch each DHCP server every time someone gets a new PC or moves from site to site, but you wont find that in any enterprise environment of 100,000+ people.

This entire line of conversation is bizarre.

The guy wants a static IP.  For a miner.  Not for the west coast division of megaco.

There are 2 options:  manually configure this on every box, or make reservations in a central console.

Reservations is a better way to do it.

The end.  Whether you are on a small home network or a massive corporate network, if you want static IPs, it makes complete sense to do it centrally.  Going around and manually configuring thousands of PCs makes no more sense than manually configuring a handful.  Its just silly no matter what.

Yep, you are correct... I just found it surprising that some people thought some large enterprises used reservations for all their end users... something I was interested in learning more about/discussing best practices, but completely off topic, so I apologize for that and will shut up now Smiley
boozer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 309


View Profile
February 29, 2012, 08:50:32 AM
 #175

what you mean by "modifications" so I cannot speculate on their effects.  Things works fine for me here on the one machine and one wireless adapter I use.  It's the standard network manager found in tons of other Linuxes, should be fairly cut and dry. that's all I can say.

Yea, for some reason I couldnt get it to work.  I removed network manager and installed Wicd and it worked fine... not sure what my problem with network manager was... But Wicd is working great and connects at startup without prompting for Wireless key.
Splirow
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Activity: 164


View Profile
February 29, 2012, 09:43:12 AM
 #176

Lodcrappo,

Why do i get this? Seems like the css is not loading properly.

Cobra
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Activity: 289



View Profile
February 29, 2012, 05:22:24 PM
 #177

I see the same thing with the CSS.

Sent a donation of 4btc, keep up the great work lodcrappo!

I have been completely stable on 0.5b for 20hrs with all fixes until now.  (2) 5970's running 830/300 and a 5850 running 930/300, temps all about 65c. Out of the blue everything just crashed all at once, I heard fans all slow down at once, I'm not sure if it restarted by itself or not but wouldn't expect it to after 20hrs of solid performance. Anything is possible though. Everything started back up but the graphs are wiped out, does it delete all graphs on each restart? 

The main problem is when no changes were made to any config file now one of the GPU's on one of the 5970's will not overclock, it is running stock clock even though it still has OC set in bamt.conf from the way it was before.  When starting the miner you can see all of the other cards apply the OC in the command line.....it does not apply the OC for this particular GPU.  I had this happen before and the only way I got around this was to format my USB stick and start over and it will be fine. I know the reboot could be caused by power supply load but I just don't know why I can't get the OC back for one of the GPU's after this crash.



malevolent
can into space
Staff
Legendary
*
Offline Offline

Activity: 1624



View Profile
February 29, 2012, 09:23:05 PM
 #178

I got 'boot disk failure' while POSTing message upon restart, does that mean my pendrive is already dying? I reinserted it and pressed enter and it's fine but I'm not sure if this is not gonna repeat when I am away and a GPU locks up.
So it's not actually related to BAMT but I'm really interested how long can a decent pendrive last (I'm using an 8GB QPI)
max in montreal
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 504


View Profile
February 29, 2012, 09:39:32 PM
 #179

many people have this problem. probably something on the usb got corupt. I must have reimaged over 100 times...USB is still good though...usually screws up after a reboot...
lodcrappo
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Activity: 588


View Profile WWW
February 29, 2012, 09:54:14 PM
 #180

I see the same thing with the CSS.

Sent a donation of 4btc, keep up the great work lodcrappo!

I have been completely stable on 0.5b for 20hrs with all fixes until now.  (2) 5970's running 830/300 and a 5850 running 930/300, temps all about 65c. Out of the blue everything just crashed all at once, I heard fans all slow down at once, I'm not sure if it restarted by itself or not but wouldn't expect it to after 20hrs of solid performance. Anything is possible though. Everything started back up but the graphs are wiped out, does it delete all graphs on each restart?  

The main problem is when no changes were made to any config file now one of the GPU's on one of the 5970's will not overclock, it is running stock clock even though it still has OC set in bamt.conf from the way it was before.  When starting the miner you can see all of the other cards apply the OC in the command line.....it does not apply the OC for this particular GPU.  I had this happen before and the only way I got around this was to format my USB stick and start over and it will be fine. I know the reboot could be caused by power supply load but I just don't know why I can't get the OC back for one of the GPU's after this crash.


Your overclocking was too high.

Your GPU locked up.

In order to make the best of the situation, BAMT has disabled O/C on that GPU and rebooted.

This allowed your rig to continue mining in a situation where otherwise it would have sat there locked up.  You're welcome.

Now you must reduce overclocking settings, remove the file in /live/image/BAMT/CONTROL/ACTIVE that has suspended o/c, and restart mining.

PS - Graphs and all recorded data are generated in ram only.  They are lost at every reboot.  This is to prevent your USB key from being destroyed.  You can run Munin on a regular linux box and gather stats/graphs from an unlimted # of bamt rigs and store them for as long as you want, but a USB based system cannot do this.


If you want to support further development of BAMT (http://bamter.org/):  1PoRYaGS56ksQmK7XXLurW3B2zwCAE8PRc
Pages: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 [9] 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 ... 80 »
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Sponsored by , a Bitcoin-accepting VPN.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!