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Author Topic: Gold collapsing. Bitcoin UP.  (Read 1938880 times)
Odalv
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December 31, 2014, 07:21:09 AM
 #19181

Extraordinary. $0.03 per GB.  There will be no blockchain storage problems:

http://www.zdnet.com/article/seagate-offers-low-cost-8tb-hard-drives/

100,000 users =  32 GB

7,000,000,000 user = 2,000,000 GB every year  =>  2,000,000 * $0.03 = $60k /year

i know you're better than that with extrapolations.  i've seen much higher estimates of userbase; like 2M?  anyways, by the time we get to 7B users, storage space is likely to be $0.00003/GB or $60/yr Wink

I have few easy questions:
 - how much bitcoin transactions did you do last year ?  ( 0 )
 - how much fiat transactions did you do last year ?  ( 1,000 )

And 1 harder questions:
 - how big would be blockchain if 1,000,000 users creates 1,000 bitcoin transactions each last year ? ( 20-40 times  bigger than is now )
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December 31, 2014, 09:05:07 AM
 #19182


i thought this comment from coinlock debating aminok on Reddit was interesting: ...


Cypherdoc encounters Coinlock on Reddit:





Ladies and gentlemen. Just look at  what I've had to deal with for 4 years now.  Roll Eyes

BTW, ain't dat da little dog I be talkin bout?
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December 31, 2014, 09:10:52 AM
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as for Daniel's video, you're late, as i already posted about their podcast and commented on it 5d ago here:  
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=68655.msg9945975#msg9945975

I posted the article http://bitcoinist.net/the-two-ideologies-in-bitcoin/ which came before the podcast and covers more topics & is clearer IMO.

Actually not even.  The podcast is on a completely different topic: a response to Vitalik Buterin's bitcoin maximalism assertion (its pretty funny everyone is too polite to accuse Vitalik of ether maximalism given the percentage of the premine he owns).  

I encourage you (or others) to read David Krawisz article http://bitcoinist.net/the-two-ideologies-in-bitcoin/ he is quite knowledgeable about economics and able to reason.  He draws a conclusion that is a little different to what most are assuming: that it is investors that drive bitcoins price & network effect, and transactional usage follows; rather than the assumption many make that it is the usage that drives intrinsic value & network effect.  I am not sure about that - maybe its a bit of both, but its an interesting and well reasoned argument, that is somewhat reassuring - we're not fully beholden to the success of people like bitpay trying to integrate merchants and the success of those merchants in having people pay in bitcoin etc. if Krawisz is to some extent right.

Adam

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December 31, 2014, 09:25:36 AM
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as for Daniel's video, you're late, as i already posted about their podcast and commented on it 5d ago here:  
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=68655.msg9945975#msg9945975

I posted the article http://bitcoinist.net/the-two-ideologies-in-bitcoin/ which came before the podcast and covers more topics & is clearer IMO.

Actually not even.  The podcast is on a completely different topic: a response to Vitalik Buterin's bitcoin maximalism assertion (its pretty funny everyone is too polite to accuse Vitalik of ether maximalism given the percentage of the premine he owns).  

I encourage you (or others) to read David Krawisz article http://bitcoinist.net/the-two-ideologies-in-bitcoin/ he is quite knowledgeable about economics and able to reason.  He draws a conclusion that is a little different to what most are assuming: that it is investors that drive bitcoins price & network effect, and transactional usage follows; rather than the assumption many make that it is the usage that drives intrinsic value & network effect.  I am not sure about that - maybe its a bit of both, but its an interesting and well reasoned argument, that is somewhat reassuring - we're not fully beholden to the success of people like bitpay trying to integrate merchants and the success of those merchants in having people pay in bitcoin etc. if Krawisz is to some extent right.

Adam


Right. At the end of all of this, stands bitcoin's status as limited-supply, censorship resistant money.

It's something of an accident that *right now* bitcoin enjoys superior transactional properties to online fiat payment systems. Legacy money will get better over time, and crypto won't have the same sorts of obvious and immediate transactional advantages that it currently enjoys. How would the btc merchant-service-providers fair if legacy payments didn't suck?

At that point, it should become more obvious that bitcoin's strength and value proposition is not so much in payments, or even "programmable" money, but as fully independent money. People have to eventually find value in that for bitcoin to have a robust future.

Bitcoin is the first monetary system to credibly offer perfect information to all economic participants.
But Bitcointalk & /r/bitcoin are heavily censored. bitco.in/forum, forum.bitcoin.com, and /r/btc are open.
Best info on Casascius coins: http://spotcoins.com/casascius
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December 31, 2014, 09:28:28 AM
 #19185

Extraordinary. $0.03 per GB.  There will be no blockchain storage problems:

http://www.zdnet.com/article/seagate-offers-low-cost-8tb-hard-drives/

100,000 users =  32 GB

7,000,000,000 user = 2,000,000 GB every year  =>  2,000,000 * $0.03 = $60k /year

i know you're better than that with extrapolations.  i've seen much higher estimates of userbase; like 2M?  anyways, by the time we get to 7B users, storage space is likely to be $0.00003/GB or $60/yr Wink

I have few easy questions:
 - how much bitcoin transactions did you do last year ?  ( 0 )
 - how much fiat transactions did you do last year ?  ( 1,000 )

And 1 harder questions:
 - how big would be blockchain if 1,000,000 users creates 1,000 bitcoin transactions each last year ? ( 20-40 times  bigger than is now )

If you have a point, make it.
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December 31, 2014, 09:48:44 AM
 #19186

Extraordinary. $0.03 per GB.  There will be no blockchain storage problems:

http://www.zdnet.com/article/seagate-offers-low-cost-8tb-hard-drives/

100,000 users =  32 GB

7,000,000,000 user = 2,000,000 GB every year  =>  2,000,000 * $0.03 = $60k /year

i know you're better than that with extrapolations.  i've seen much higher estimates of userbase; like 2M?  anyways, by the time we get to 7B users, storage space is likely to be $0.00003/GB or $60/yr Wink

I have few easy questions:
 - how much bitcoin transactions did you do last year ?  ( 0 )
 - how much fiat transactions did you do last year ?  ( 1,000 )

And 1 harder questions:
 - how big would be blockchain if 1,000,000 users creates 1,000 bitcoin transactions each last year ? ( 20-40 times  bigger than is now )

If you have a point, make it.

:-) Sidechains is great idea. Bitcoin wont survive without SC.
SC solves all known problems.
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December 31, 2014, 10:00:52 AM
 #19187

so i ask you, Adam, why should i do a 180 degree flip in what i was sold back then and now "trust" you to do what's right for Bitcoin when you have a fiduciary duty to do what's right for Blockstream?
Despite all promises made, my question was never answered:

https://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/2k3u97/we_are_bitcoin_sidechain_paper_authors_adam_back/clhni79

I guess you mean:

Quote from: justusranvier link=reddit
Who are the investors in Blockstream, and how will you respond if they want you to discourage future Bitcoin protocol upgrades that would reduce the need for sidechains?

Why shouldn't the rest of the community be concerned by the apparent financial incentive Blockstream has to get their soft fork in, and then filibuster any future protocol upgrades?

I guess the response from myself and GMaxwell kind of drifted off the topic of your question.

Sidechains are not a proprietary technology.  Everything is FOSS, open IP.  And we invested a fair bit of mental energy and legal review already into making sure it stays that way, even if blockstream management were someone replaced or blackmailed; to imagine yourself or a company a perpetual lifetime role is naive, and we've seen it before eg digicash patents got sold by the investors when they went bankrupt to some company that sat on them, preventing people who wanted to innovate using ecash.  We're all anti-patent and want to avoid that kind of crap creeping into bitcoin.  I have some first hand knowledge that some companies are patenting things related to bitcoin, and probably much more I dont know about.  I suppose someone could search patent db though filing is a long slow process.  At ZKS where I was working on our ToR-precursor and ecash, back in 1999-2001, Austin tried to buy digicash patent and making it available in the public domain, we failed to buy it sadly.  John Gilmore was our advisor and he'd helped cook up an open patent license GNU like scheme.

Its not our softfork - its a softfork to enable a generic extension mechanism.  We have no monopoly (and wouldnt want one) on use of the op code.  Our only defence is meritocracy - if we build better, more secure sidechains and people prefer to use them.  We wont be getting the fees off the sidechain either because those go to miners.  If we have the technical edge and people use our stuff that seems sort of fair enough to me.

Personally I guarantee I trust each and everyone of our team more than J Random web2.0 startup CEO.  What do those guys want?  To make a profit.  Would they stop at sabotaging bitcoin to get there?  I doubt it.  Some of the bitcoin web2.0 startup guys are cool and bitcoin enthused.  But they're getting patents some of them, and not all of them will survive.  Crappy things the less cool startup CEOs might try eg the red-ilist or other things so sucky I wouldnt even describe them for fear it'd give people ideas that they lack the technical competence to design.

I do get where you're coming from, in the past I was the guy holding people to account eg PGP incorporated when they were busy trying to include key escrow into PGP ostensibly for corporate data access.  (I imagine people selling stingrays tell themselves something also).  Partly due to my efforts that was never included in the open-pgp IETF spec.

Sidechains are just a mechanism to extend bitcoin.  The interesting thing is the extension not the chain.  If a better way to do it materialises great.  If some sidechain innovations are so cool and well validated from $1b resting on them for a year that it allows bitcoin core to merge them fantastic.  Actually Pieter Wuille views that as the best way to view the utility of sidechains, to enable longer and live validation of things that could then go into bitcoin where that'd be difficult to impossible to gain that confidence on directly.

There can also however be one-size fits-all limits.  Some extensions are mutually incompatible, or too risky though interesting (eg snark contracts, zerocash) unless a way to contain the risk in chain is found.  Also you can get some new scaling possibilities by having chains with different blocksizes.  Its more decentralised and safer to have a small bitcoin main block and a medium sized sidechain block, than introduce a large main bitcoin block as there is an escape route and choice.  You can within limits get your cake and eat it.

Adam

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December 31, 2014, 10:19:55 AM
 #19188

I encourage you (or others) to read David Krawisz article http://bitcoinist.net/the-two-ideologies-in-bitcoin/ he is quite knowledgeable about economics and able to reason.  He draws a conclusion that is a little different to what most are assuming: that it is investors that drive bitcoins price & network effect, and transactional usage follows; rather than the assumption many make that it is the usage that drives intrinsic value & network effect.  I am not sure about that - maybe its a bit of both, but its an interesting and well reasoned argument, that is somewhat reassuring - we're not fully beholden to the success of people like bitpay trying to integrate merchants and the success of those merchants in having people pay in bitcoin etc. if Krawisz is to some extent right.

Right. At the end of all of this, stands bitcoin's status as limited-supply, censorship resistant money.

It's something of an accident that *right now* bitcoin enjoys superior transactional properties to online fiat payment systems. Legacy money will get better over time, and crypto won't have the same sorts of obvious and immediate transactional advantages that it currently enjoys. How would the btc merchant-service-providers fair if legacy payments didn't suck?

At that point, it should become more obvious that bitcoin's strength and value proposition is not so much in payments, or even "programmable" money, but as fully independent money. People have to eventually find value in that for bitcoin to have a robust future.

Yep.  Bitcoin has a lot to offer, and some of those things are not possible for the legacy systems to mimic.  Particularly sound money, no counter-party risk, irreversable transactions (seizing and freezing basically prevent that outside of paper cash, though even that is partly relying on fungibility laws or it could have reversibility problems).  Smart-contracts that are strengthened by no counter-party risk and irreversibility are one of the most interesting advantages I think.  Without irreversibility and no freezability a "smart-contract" isnt smart, its just an electronic contract and we already have those.  Ultimately if you combine it all you could rearchitect the financial system to largely remove systemic risk, add competition legacy systems cant react to (they intrinsically need their governance costs).  This is why people gave us $21mil.  Bitcoin all-in is a big deal.  Sound-money is cool, but its only part of the picture.

Even if bitcoin transactions ended up costing more than headline fees for some transaction types, but it would still be worth it because of those features, the legacy system has higher costs, its just those are appearing in other places or disguised in the price.  The dispute resolution cost and auditors and governance and separate of duties and systemic risk and strong relevance of credit rating create an environment that must charge higher fees, and can charge much higher fees on top because of the barrier to entry to obtaining a corporate credit rating and reputation.  With bitcoin technology the product has the credit-rating, and is subject to real-time audit like bitcoins real-time assay.

A good day to buy more bitcoins.  Its cheap at the price and most do not understand this potential.  Its like 1990s internet tech stocks.

Adam

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December 31, 2014, 03:19:52 PM
 #19189

SC solves all known problems.
Death also does this, but I am not eager for it.

FREE MONEY1 Bitcoin for Silver and Gold NewLibertyDollar.com and now BITCOIN SPECIE (silver 1 ozt) shows value by QR
Bulk premiums as low as .0012 BTC "BETTER, MORE COLLECTIBLE, AND CHEAPER THAN SILVER EAGLES" 1Free of Government
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December 31, 2014, 03:49:39 PM
 #19190

Of course, as always, I happen to see sidechains as not only 'right' for Bitcoin but basically Bitcoin's best hope for success.  Naturally this goes some distance toward helping build my confidence in the enterprise as well, and makes it quite understandable why this novel contract agreement bullet-point is acceptable to all.

you're missing the point.  the act of leaving by those devs requires a conscious act and decision to do the "right" thing.  how can we keep trying to sell Bitcoin to the world as a "trustless" system when we have to "trust" Blockstream devs to do the right thing?

I'm not sure if you know but people who can code in bitcoin core receive frequent lucrative offers (eg like $500k) to code altcoins.  Devs all received them, and rejected them.  The only people who took such money was Peter Todd (I think busy at $250/hr), however as I understand it he only takes that work with the caveat that he can work on decentralising bitcoin or other tech that is mutually useful to bitcoin.   A few of these guys have almost no bitcoins or spent them trying to do startups or such things.  I think thats a pretty clear evidence of intent to do the right thing.  They have more fealty to bitcoin as a concept and doing the right thing than putting food on their table.  And also disdain for ethics of pump & dump business models that have victims at the bottom of the pyramid.

You can view that while in theory some one could fork bitcoin if Gavin went nutso on something really bad (or was blackmailed into doing something dodgy) or something, that the community could fork the code.  However in practice there is also realistically a shortage of people with the skill set to maintain and create security patches for a fork, so while the desire to do it would be real, the number of devs is a problem.

As Greg mentions here thats something we thought was important to improve - train more core devs - so there is more decentralisation.  http://www.coindesk.com/gregory-maxwell-went-bitcoin-skeptic-core-developer/

Secondly basically there isnt anything thats going to happen in the core that a consensus of this group of people dont agree to.  And they listen to feedback and want to keep the social contract and understand that contract.  In fact their view is ideally its impossible for them to not keep the social contract (for their own personal safety as well as desired outcome) because the bitcoin network is really controlled by the economic majority.  Thats kind of what cant be evil is about, an attempt to replicate that type of thinking into a corporate structure to fail-safe it.  Not even miners can fork the protocol if no full nodes nor users like the change.  That effect holds companies honest to bitcoin ethos - companies are dead in the water without developers.  As I said our company was founded by core developers.  And we actually view it as a feature that if we all disagreed vehemently with a strategy the company would have a problem - like a technical inability to do the thing we disagreed with.

Its actually in the companies interest to do the right thing as a company also, in terms of fiduciary responsibility because something bad for bitcoin ethos will likely be rejected by the bitcoin user & business community.

You might imagine given the shortage any core developer could walk out and get  job the next day.  Even outside of bitcoin its a pretty uber-geek architect level crowd in terms of employability.  But right now the only hope of doing something might be Peter Todd (however he's pretty rabidly pro-decentralisation, pro-anonymity (eg stealth addresses etc), anti-censorship (work on proof of publication and end-to-end policy full node only exploration with tree-chains idea) etc so I doubt he'd be interested to do something bad for users), or perhaps Mike Hearn (who sort of floated the idea of red-lists though I'm not sure how serious he was).  However I dont think Mike did a lot of core development in years, more working on java wallet library and apps.

Sidechains may also be good for that - an escape valve - people who want to do crazy stuff, can go do it in a sidechain, that no one (who cares about bitcoin ethos features) would use.  Vs try to coerce legally or otherwise developers into subverting bitcoin itself at its core where there's no choice left, and bitcoin risks destruction.

In summary yes we thought about this stuff, and outside of some disagreement that sidechains create more risk than they remove (I say they remove risk, because bitcoin is exposed to offchain risk & monetary shocks from eg mtgoxings, such that sidechains are a clear improvement over offchain economically), I'd imagine we're in violent agreement on the ethos of bitcoin and whats are the important aspects of idealised bitcoin features & ethos.

Feel free to suggest protocol improvements.  Eg other ways to firewall features (eg hardened vm per feature inside core) or whatever.

Adam

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December 31, 2014, 03:51:06 PM
 #19191

http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2014/12/31/winklevoss-bitcoin-trust-files-to-sell-201-million-shares/

"The Winklevoss Bitcoin Trust on Wednesday filed to sell 20.1 million shares on the Nasdaq exchange. The shares represent units of interest in the bitcoin exchange-traded fund launched by Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, the twins who are best known for their legal dispute with Mark Zuckerberg over Facebook's origins. The ETF will be listed under the symbol COIN, according to the filing. The Winklevoss brothers also launched a bitcoin index - the Winkdex - in February. Bitcoin is a decentralized virtual currency that has attracted attention for its big price swings."  Cool

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December 31, 2014, 03:55:02 PM
 #19192

http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2014/12/31/winklevoss-bitcoin-trust-files-to-sell-201-million-shares/

"The Winklevoss Bitcoin Trust on Wednesday filed to sell 20.1 million shares on the Nasdaq exchange. The shares represent units of interest in the bitcoin exchange-traded fund launched by Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, the twins who are best known for their legal dispute with Mark Zuckerberg over Facebook's origins. The ETF will be listed under the symbol COIN, according to the filing. The Winklevoss brothers also launched a bitcoin index - the Winkdex - in February. Bitcoin is a decentralized virtual currency that has attracted attention for its big price swings."  Cool

Sure hoping 2015 is the year (and earlier in better than later!) they get the bitcoin ETF operational.  I know lots of semi-technical or even technical people who'd really like to invest in bitcoin that cant handle or dont want the risk of the technical management of coins and so have held off buying for purely that reason.

Adam

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December 31, 2014, 03:57:09 PM
 #19193

SC solves all known problems.
Death also does this, but I am not eager for it.

JStolfi is a troll but I'd guess he'd call this marketing.
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December 31, 2014, 04:00:33 PM
 #19194

http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2014/12/31/winklevoss-bitcoin-trust-files-to-sell-201-million-shares/

"The Winklevoss Bitcoin Trust on Wednesday filed to sell 20.1 million shares on the Nasdaq exchange. The shares represent units of interest in the bitcoin exchange-traded fund launched by Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, the twins who are best known for their legal dispute with Mark Zuckerberg over Facebook's origins. The ETF will be listed under the symbol COIN, according to the filing. The Winklevoss brothers also launched a bitcoin index - the Winkdex - in February. Bitcoin is a decentralized virtual currency that has attracted attention for its big price swings."  Cool

Sure hoping 2015 is the year (and earlier in better than later!) they get the bitcoin ETF operational.  I know lots of semi-technical or even technical people who'd really like to invest in bitcoin that cant handle or dont want the risk of the technical management of coins and so have held off buying for purely that reason.

Adam


Exactly!

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December 31, 2014, 04:04:35 PM
 #19195

so i ask you, Adam, why should i do a 180 degree flip in what i was sold back then and now "trust" you to do what's right for Bitcoin when you have a fiduciary duty to do what's right for Blockstream?
Despite all promises made, my question was never answered:

https://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/2k3u97/we_are_bitcoin_sidechain_paper_authors_adam_back/clhni79

furthermore, imo for global adoption to occur, Bitcoin must be free from all conflicts of interest.  it has evolved to the level of a public good.

For conflict freedom to occur (and I think its an interesting and useful objective) bitcoin perhaps needs to be simplified and frozen, maybe moved to a formally provable specification rather than code as definition.  Soft-forks could be prevented by consensus rule if we were convinced of perfect correctness.  

Hard-forks are harder to foist on people because they require a near absolute majority whereas soft-forks are a bit more miner influenceable.

If we had an extension mechanism that doesnt touch core once setup, the core becomes that bit closer to freezable & formal specifiable refactor becoming possible.  If we have the possibility for live-betas we are more likely to be able to get to formal specification as definition.  (Thats a hard-fork for sure).

Another aspect of conflict freedom (other than freezing and forcing change to be hard-fork) is to enable permissionless innovation - then there's no conflict, people who want to try things can go try them without lobbying for changes to bitcoin.  Also good.

Adam

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December 31, 2014, 04:10:40 PM
 #19196

the bitcoin network is really controlled by the economic majority.  Thats kind of what cant be evil is about, an attempt to replicate that type of thinking into a corporate structure to fail-safe it.  Not even miners can fork the protocol if no full nodes nor users like the change.

You are aware of the Eyal and Sirer paper on this, right?  As I understant, a majority coalition of miners can force users to change the protocol, by sabotaging the "orthodox" chain.  Then it would be in the interest of uses and any "orthodox" miners to upgrade to the protocol chosen by the cartel.

If the change is minor (e.g., "postpone the next reward halving to 2018"), most bitcoin users will not mind.  Only ideological purists will be upset, but all they could do is create yet another fork, with a PoW that cannot be mined by the current equipment.  But then no orthodox miners could mine this new "true bitcoin reborn" chain either, so it would start out with a minuscule CPU-based network.

Quote
outside of some disagreement that sidechains create more risk than they remove (I say they remove risk, because bitcoin is exposed to offchain risk & monetary shocks from eg mtgoxings, such that sidechains are a clear improvement over offchain economically)

What would prevent a sidechain from being a scam?  Sidechains will not be cleared, audited, or reulated, by Blockstream or anyone else.  Their protocols cannot be constrained in any significant way, without destroying their presumed merits.  Or is there anything in the whitepaper and other literature that I have missed?

Academic interest in bitcoin only. Not owner, not trader, very skeptical of its longterm success.
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December 31, 2014, 04:15:24 PM
 #19197

you're still that little dog who nips at my trouser bottoms.

I thought you said you didnt do ad-hominems to troll and fan reaction?  Just a few posts back too.  

Decorum!

Stuff like that is why bitcointroll.org is redirecting here.  Also it pushes out more tech focussed people who want some civility and dont have the USENET flame war developed rhinoceros hide and egos to say "fuck you too" and keep talking.

What the tvbcof said seemed pretty reasoned to me, and if you read it neutrally, not to be calling Gavin names, just talking about hypothetical conflicts of interest, independence etc.  

I share his view about balance of power helping also, eg you can see that Microsoft & Apple are both pretty world domination evil corporations.  And yet the growth of apple's market penetration of OSX has weakened eithers ability to execute on their rent-seeking actions.  Thats a pretty conventional understanding of the real-world.

Adam

hashcash, committed transactions, homomorphic values, blind kdf; researching decentralization, scalability and fungibility/anonymity
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December 31, 2014, 04:27:37 PM
 #19198

the bitcoin network is really controlled by the economic majority.  Thats kind of what cant be evil is about, an attempt to replicate that type of thinking into a corporate structure to fail-safe it.  Not even miners can fork the protocol if no full nodes nor users like the change.

You are aware of the Eyal and Sirer paper on this, right?  As I understant, a majority coalition of miners can force users to change the protocol, by sabotaging the "orthodox" chain.  Then it would be in the interest of uses and any "orthodox" miners to upgrade to the protocol chosen by the cartel.

They can only force soft-forks, hard-forks are ignored by full-nodes and clients.  An attempted forced-hard fork results in hostile miners forming an alt-coin with no users.  The limiting factor is soft-forks are quite flexible and can do a lot, some of which could be undesirable.

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If the change is minor (e.g., "postpone the next reward halving to 2018"), most bitcoin users will not mind.  Only ideological purists will be upset, but all they could do is create yet another fork, with a PoW that cannot be mined by the current equipment.  But then no orthodox miners could mine this new "true bitcoin reborn" chain either, so it would start out with a minuscule CPU-based network.

the nuclear big-red-button option of tweaking the PoW hash is a meta threat to miners that they dont quite have the upper hand - if they abuse it, or get too crazily centralised - people would worst case be willing to push it.

Probably thats a MAD argument that keeps miners somewhat sensible as if that button is pushed they are sitting on $500m of scrap electronics with a low scrap parts salvage value.

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outside of some disagreement that sidechains create more risk than they remove (I say they remove risk, because bitcoin is exposed to offchain risk & monetary shocks from eg mtgoxings, such that sidechains are a clear improvement over offchain economically)

What would prevent a sidechain from being a scam?  Sidechains will not be cleared, audited, or reulated, by Blockstream or anyone else.  Their protocols cannot be constrained in any significant way, without destroying their presumed merits.  Or is there anything in the whitepaper and other literature that I have missed?

Outside of spam limits which could be protocol enforced, its caveat emptor, you shouldnt put money into a chain unless there is some assurance that security & bitcoin protocol knowledgeable people have audited it.  People could certify chains (like sign them - "my name is blah and I'm a security researcher with reputation and I and my buddies audited this code and its good") or wallets could etc.  Its good and a feature that people can opt to use uncertified chains.  You want a situation where there is real open possibility for technical innovation & competition in chain features.

You also want no central control so no chains can get black listed.

Adam

hashcash, committed transactions, homomorphic values, blind kdf; researching decentralization, scalability and fungibility/anonymity
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December 31, 2014, 04:36:43 PM
 #19199

you're still that little dog who nips at my trouser bottoms.

I thought you said you didnt do ad-hominems to troll and fan reaction?  Just a few posts back too.  

Decorum!

Stuff like that is why bitcointroll.org is redirecting here.  Also it pushes out more tech focussed people who want some civility and dont have the USENET flame war developed rhinoceros hide and egos to say "fuck you too" and keep talking.

What the tvbcof said seemed pretty reasoned to me, and if you read it neutrally, not to be calling Gavin names, just talking about hypothetical conflicts of interest, independence etc.  

I share his view about balance of power helping also, eg you can see that Microsoft & Apple are both pretty world domination evil corporations.  And yet the growth of apple's market penetration of OSX has weakened eithers ability to execute on their rent-seeking actions.  Thats a pretty conventional understanding of the real-world.

Adam


Adam, you're soft and need to develop a back bone.

you don't understand how to develop a popular thread nor sustain interest in one over a several year time period either it appears.  the reason this thread is so popular and long lasting is precisely b/c i am NOT a troll.  i bring a large amount of dedicated, insightful info, and logic to this thread and balance it with a healthy bit of "discipline" towards those who i think deserve it. it's my way of screening out the real trolls. i've been very effective at it over the years yet you conveniently try to lump this thread with bitcointroll.org while ignoring what Justusranvier just said a few posts up about how this thread has a high SNR unlike other threads throughout the forum. the high # of views and the mere fact that you are here are testimony to this fact.  you have no insight into the relationship i have with tvbcof going back 4 yrs so you ought not comment on it.  i actually don't mind him and i think he actually likes me.  but we go back and forth with each other once in a while and it provides entertainment for everyone.  we have a "volatile relationship" so to speak. Wink

speaking of trolling, btw, did you or BS hire brg444 to come here and troll me and promote SC's?
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December 31, 2014, 04:37:21 PM
 #19200

i view Bitcoin as digital gold which is the principle behind this long thread.  but better.  no one can transmute gold atoms into SCgold. 

Here is food for thought... What if the dollar had somehow been pegged at an elemental level to gold from the beginning?  Would the dollar still be sound money today?  Obviously, a very fragile and subjective peg maintained by central banks did not work.  Gold lost is dominance as the world's reserve currency because of lack of utility but if that utility could have been preserved by scaling gold's utility at a fundamental level vs scaling at such a weak level (USD), then it may have worked.

I believe this is the crux of the whole issue and you are right, there is no precedent for it.  Unfortunately, the only way I see to figure out if a protocol level peg will be strong enough is by trial and error in a live environment.  Theoretically, this should be the last major untested change to the main chain as all other major changes can be done on side chains before being implemented on the main chain, if ever.

Counterfeit:  made in imitation of something else with intent to deceive:  merriam-webster
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