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Question: Will you support Gavin's new block size limit hard fork of 8MB by January 1, 2016 then doubling every 2 years?
1.  yes
2.  no

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Author Topic: Gold collapsing. Bitcoin UP.  (Read 1922243 times)
smooth
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July 29, 2015, 08:57:50 PM
 #29501

decision to force a fee market is a centralized solution

On it's face this is a nonsense argument since any development decisions are centralized in the same manner.

Increase the blocksize, decrease the blocksize, or leave it alone, they are all (centralized) development decisions.

It's also false that anything is really centralized about it because if there were truly a consensus for change (over the objections of the 'centralized' developers) there would be a successful fork.


Yes all dev decisions are essentially centralized, including the decision to NOT do something.  Since that is trivially true, I am talking about the effect of the decision.  And in one case miners can optimize their profitability by choosing to include transactions while in another case they are artificially limited.

Listen to New Liberty, he got this completely right. Whether miners can optimize their profitability is beside the point, because in doing so they also influence others' costs, and they are most certainly not optimizing that.

The idea of a sensible market arising for block size in the current structure if the consensus block size rule (which is the only mechanism for the "others" in the previous paragraph to participate in such a market) is a fantasy.
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July 29, 2015, 09:00:10 PM
 #29502

on the technology front the Bitcoin developers seem oblivious to innovations in data access and storage.

http://newsroom.intel.com/community/intel_newsroom/blog/2015/07/28/intel-and-micron-produce-breakthrough-memory-technology

Quote
"One of the most significant hurdles in modern computing is the time it takes the processor to reach data on long-term storage," said Mark Adams, president of Micron. "This new class of non-volatile memory is a revolutionary technology that allows for quick access to enormous data sets and enables entirely new applications."

Thank me in Bits 12MwnzxtprG2mHm3rKdgi7NmJKCypsMMQw
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July 29, 2015, 09:00:27 PM
 #29503

notice how the extra fees paid by full blocks actually strengthened the mining hashrate during the last attacks.  probably the extra revenue from tx fees encouraged miners to bring on more hashrate.  that's a good thing and could actually be even better if they were allowed to harvest/clear all the additional fees in the bloated mempools:



your willingness to connect two dots is astounding

notice how i used that graph in a series of graphs and data to support my supposition.  unlike you who is here to troll and cherrypick.

Do not spread nonsenses.
How this chart correlates with your theory.



And look at this http://www.kncminer.com/blog/newsarchive#changing-the-game-again
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July 29, 2015, 09:06:31 PM
 #29504

decision to force a fee market is a centralized solution

On it's face this is a nonsense argument since any development decisions are centralized in the same manner.

Increase the blocksize, decrease the blocksize, or leave it alone, they are all (centralized) development decisions.

It's also false that anything is really centralized about it because if there were truly a consensus for change (over the objections of the 'centralized' developers) there would be a successful fork.


Yes all dev decisions are essentially centralized, including the decision to NOT do something.  Since that is trivially true, I am talking about the effect of the decision.  And in one case miners can optimize their profitability by choosing to include transactions while in another case they are artificially limited.

Listen to New Liberty, he got this completely right. Whether miners can optimize their profitability is beside the point, because in doing so they also influence others' costs, and they are most certainly not optimizing that.

The idea of a sensible market arising for block size in the current structure if the consensus block size rule (which is the only mechanism for the "others" in the previous paragraph to participate in such a market) is a fantasy.


i don't get this at all.  as a former miner, given all the investment in mining equipment one has to make along with all the labor and ongoing costs, any profit the miner makes is deserved; and it's often not that much of a profit.  full nodes, otoh, only have to rent a vps at most which is minimal cost. 

all this complaining by LukeJr et al about everyone else forcing him to bear costs in Bitcoin is ridiculous.  by running a full node you're helping to prop your investment in the coin and you should be using it to secure your own tx's; which should be a security measure you're willing to pay for.  as the user base grows, if we let it, then merchant base grows with it and they will be more than willing from a security and fiduciary standpoint to increase the availability of full nodes across the network.

and as far as game theory with miners goes, they sure do have an incentive to optimize the size of their blocks thru fear of orphaning and thru fear of causing disruption to full nodes and users which both would decrease their surrounding security and tx throughput in terms of fees by users.  not to mention constantly having a Damocle's Sword over their heads via their hashers who can move to another pool in an instant.
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July 29, 2015, 09:10:10 PM
 #29505

notice how the extra fees paid by full blocks actually strengthened the mining hashrate during the last attacks.  probably the extra revenue from tx fees encouraged miners to bring on more hashrate.  that's a good thing and could actually be even better if they were allowed to harvest/clear all the additional fees in the bloated mempools:



your willingness to connect two dots is astounding

notice how i used that graph in a series of graphs and data to support my supposition.  unlike you who is here to troll and cherrypick.

Do not spread nonsenses.
How this chart correlates with your theory.



And look at this http://www.kncminer.com/blog/newsarchive#changing-the-game-again

how does it not correlate with my theory?  yours is just a long term zoom out of the hashrate which obscures the shorter effect of the stress test.
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July 29, 2015, 09:18:16 PM
 #29506

missed the part about KNC and 16nm.  sure, that could be it also altho given that post is from June 3 it's not clear if those are online yet.
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July 29, 2015, 09:21:33 PM
 #29507

The introduction of sidechains, LN and whatever other solutions is a complicated solution. It's also a solution motivated by a desire to fix a perceived economic issue, rather than sticking to the very simple issue at hand. It is the very opposite of what you are claiming to be important, that software should be kept simple.

That is a contradiction.

The simple solution is to remove the artificial cap. A cap that was put in place to prevent DDOS.

Your reference of CVE-2013-2292 is just distraction. It is a separate issue, one that exists now and would continue to exists with a larger block size.

Bloating Layer 1 is a complicated solution; scaling at Level 2+ is an elegant one.

You still don't understand Tannenbaum's maxim.  Its point isn't 'keep software simple FOREVER NO MATTER WHAT.'  That is your flawed simpleton's interpretation.

"Fighting features" means ensuring a positive trade-off in terms of security and reliability, instead of carelessly and recklessly heaping on additional functionality without the benefit of an adversarial process which tests their quality and overall impact.

One does not simply "remove the artificial cap."  You may have noticed some degree of controversy in regard to that proposal.  Bitcoin is designed to strenuously resist (IE fight) hard forks.  Perhaps you were thinking of WishGrantingUnicornCoin, which leaps into action the moment anyone has an idea and complies with their ingenious plan for whatever feature or change they desire.

Like DoS, CVE-2013-2292, as an issue that exists now, is fairly successfully mitigated by the 1MB cap.  It is not a separate concern because larger blocks exacerbate the problem in a superlinear manner.  You don't get to advocate 8MB blocks, but then wave your hands around eschewing responsibility when confronted with the immediate entailment of purposefully constructed 8MB tx taking 64 times longer to process than a 1MB one.  The issue is intrinsic to larger blocks, which is why Gavin proposed a 100k max tx size be married to any block size increase.

Fully parsed, what you are claiming is

Quote
The simple solution is to remove the artificial cap hard fork Bitcoin.

Do you realize how naive that makes you look?

If you truly understood your own position then you would argue it instead of just railing at people who might have an opposing view. Call me some more names, it's really helping the credibility of your argument.

What *is* bloat? (apart from the intentional choice of hyperbolic word). Can you put a value on what is considered bloated? Can you confidently say that your idea of what constitute bloat is some world wide standard?

You put words in my mouth, then claim those invented words make me look stupid. In fact this only serves to make you look even more desperate. if I didn't understand the maxim, I would not be able to point out just how incoherent your thought process must be if you are attempting to equate feature-set with size-of-data. I understand the difference between feature-set and data-size, do you? I'll bet you do. So, don't even for one second pretend you think that systems with more data are inherently more complex than systems with less data.

Do you truly believe they are the same thing or are you again being disingenuous in order to try and maintain your tenuous argument that effectively 'changing a config setting' is somehow more complicated than developing a whole new platform and all the interfaces necessary to communicate.

Its about as elegant as your debating skill....

Fully parsed your argument against Gavin's fix for CVE-2013-2292 seems to be, don't do it because it increases complexity. Again disingenuous or actually not very smart?

Then finally you try to create further confusion between the feature-set of software vs its deployment. To be clear, what is being kept simple is the software. I'm interested to know though just exactly what it is that is complex about the hard fork. I can think of other words that might apply - contentious, unpredictable even undesirable - depending on your viewpoint - but not complex. You put the new release up, and those that want it deploy it. Those that don't do not.

Interestingly those words that apply to the hard fork, could quite easily be used to describe intentionally restricting transaction growth by refusing to update the max block size. So in that respect both 'solutions' are equal.

In another very important respect, they are not equal. Releasing a version of bitcoin core with an increased block size allows for true consensus from the user base. Refusing to do so, is enforcing the view of some core-devs. That's what is despicable.

Thankfully in time, once the details have been ironed out and devs eventually accept some form of block size increase schedule (and they will, however much you cling to your delusion) the hard fork can happen in core, and then the miners can have the final say in what goes forward. If everyone sticks on 1MB coin then you get your wish! I'll send you a cookie, iced with the words "Well done you!".

I think though, that is what you are terrified of. That you know there is actually no way in hell the block size will stay at 1MB, but you are so married to your position that you can't let go and will say anything to defend it. It comes across in your posts.

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"A purely peer-to-peer version of electronic cash would allow online payments to be sent directly from one party to another without going through a financial institution" - Satoshi Nakamoto
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July 29, 2015, 09:28:29 PM
 #29508




Now its Frap.doc's turn to get rekt:

Piling every proof-of-work quorum system in the world into one dataset doesn't scale.

Bitcoin users might get increasingly tyrannical about limiting the size of the chain so it's easy for lots of users and small devices.


 Cheesy

You should keep in mind this while posting.

Maybe then you would take a full quote of a post, instead of just extracting a part out of its context in order to prove your point.

BitDNS users might be completely liberal about adding any large data features since relatively few domain registrars are needed, while Bitcoin users might get increasingly tyrannical about limiting the size of the chain so it's easy for lots of users and small devices.

But I guess that intellectual honesty has never been your goal here
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July 29, 2015, 09:28:44 PM
 #29509

how does it not correlate with my theory?  yours is just a long term zoom out of the hashrate which obscures the shorter effect of the stress test.

I think, everybody can see that the hashrate is growing. No matter if there is "stress test" or not.

And it is obvious that bitcoin price was $318 during the time you took days off.
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July 29, 2015, 09:33:31 PM
 #29510




Now its Frap.doc's turn to get rekt:

Piling every proof-of-work quorum system in the world into one dataset doesn't scale.

Bitcoin users might get increasingly tyrannical about limiting the size of the chain so it's easy for lots of users and small devices.


 Cheesy

You should keep in mind this while posting.

Maybe then you would take a full quote of a post, instead of just extracting a part out of its context in order to prove your point.

BitDNS users might be completely liberal about adding any large data features since relatively few domain registrars are needed, while Bitcoin users might get increasingly tyrannical about limiting the size of the chain so it's easy for lots of users and small devices.

But I guess that intellectual honesty has never been your goal here

Haha. Brilliant!! Smiley
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July 29, 2015, 09:35:29 PM
 #29511

decision to force a fee market is a centralized solution

On it's face this is a nonsense argument since any development decisions are centralized in the same manner.

Increase the blocksize, decrease the blocksize, or leave it alone, they are all (centralized) development decisions.

It's also false that anything is really centralized about it because if there were truly a consensus for change (over the objections of the 'centralized' developers) there would be a successful fork.


Yes all dev decisions are essentially centralized, including the decision to NOT do something.  Since that is trivially true, I am talking about the effect of the decision.  And in one case miners can optimize their profitability by choosing to include transactions while in another case they are artificially limited.

Listen to New Liberty, he got this completely right. Whether miners can optimize their profitability is beside the point, because in doing so they also influence others' costs, and they are most certainly not optimizing that.

The idea of a sensible market arising for block size in the current structure if the consensus block size rule (which is the only mechanism for the "others" in the previous paragraph to participate in such a market) is a fantasy.


You are correct to question whether the incentives for miners coincides with what is optimal for the rest of the network.  As we see with empty blocks and non-validated blocks these can differ.  However, your assumption that these do not coincide whatsoever is unsupported.  And with Bitcoin it is all we have, barring some centralized committee making arbitrary decisions like we have today with the core devs.  Personally, I believe that miner incentive is a reflection of optimal network use, if not 100% the same.  For example, a miner who mines a bunch of "spam" txns knows that he must store it for eternity, just like all the other nodes.

A better example is the worry that a miner will include a txn that takes 10+ minutes to validate.  It is dangerous to build on a block that can't be readily validated.  So a miner that includes one could expect that the majority hashing power would NOT move to that block, even though it may be the longest in the chain.  The "fittest" miner will mine 2 blocks in the time it takes others to validate this one and mine the next.  That need only happen once or twice to teach the rest of the network a valuable lesson.  

So miners will evolve to be tweaking their algorithms to eliminate "crazy junk" (unless that junk is sufficiently incentivized with a large txn fee -- and if someone is willing to pay a lot for it, who are we to decide that its not important... that's the free market at work) and even include "human assist" systems to optimize decisions like these.  We may get a few "natural" forks longer than just one or 2 blocks as miners choose different strategies but that is just part of the natural behavior of the core consensus algorithm.  All of this can be done without changing consensus.

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July 29, 2015, 09:38:48 PM
 #29512

how does it not correlate with my theory?  yours is just a long term zoom out of the hashrate which obscures the shorter effect of the stress test.

I think, everybody can see that the hashrate is growing. No matter if there is "stress test" or not.

And it is obvious that bitcoin price was $318 during the time you took days off.

Haha Odalv:

Quote

You should keep in mind this while posting.

But I guess that intellectual honesty has never been your goal here
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July 29, 2015, 09:41:18 PM
 #29513

Quote
Quote
how does it not correlate with my theory?  yours is just a long term zoom out of the hashrate which obscures the shorter effect of the stress test.

I think, everybody can see that the hashrate is growing. No matter if there is "stress test" or not.

And it is obvious that bitcoin price was $318 during the time you took days off.

Haha Odalv:


You should keep in mind this while posting.

Maybe then you would take a full quote of a post, instead of just extracting a part out of its context in order to prove your point.

BitDNS users might be completely liberal about adding any large data features since relatively few domain registrars are needed, while Bitcoin users might get increasingly tyrannical about limiting the size of the chain so it's easy for lots of users and small devices.

But I guess that intellectual honesty has never been your goal here

Huh


edit:
are you on drugs ?
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July 29, 2015, 09:43:45 PM
 #29514

how does it not correlate with my theory?  yours is just a long term zoom out of the hashrate which obscures the shorter effect of the stress test.

I think, everybody can see that the hashrate is growing. No matter if there is "stress test" or not.

And it is obvious that bitcoin price was $318 during the time you took days off.

Haha Odalv:


You should keep in mind this while posting.

Maybe then you would take a full quote of a post, instead of just extracting a part out of its context in order to prove your point.

BitDNS users might be completely liberal about adding any large data features since relatively few domain registrars are needed, while Bitcoin users might get increasingly tyrannical about limiting the size of the chain so it's easy for lots of users and small devices.

But I guess that intellectual honesty has never been your goal here
[/quote]

Huh


edit:
are you on drugs ?
[/quote]

Fixed. Troll.
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July 29, 2015, 09:47:10 PM
 #29515

Quote
Quote
how does it not correlate with my theory?  yours is just a long term zoom out of the hashrate which obscures the shorter effect of the stress test.

I think, everybody can see that the hashrate is growing. No matter if there is "stress test" or not.

And it is obvious that bitcoin price was $318 during the time you took days off.

Haha Odalv:


You should keep in mind this while posting.

Maybe then you would take a full quote of a post, instead of just extracting a part out of its context in order to prove your point.

BitDNS users might be completely liberal about adding any large data features since relatively few domain registrars are needed, while Bitcoin users might get increasingly tyrannical about limiting the size of the chain so it's easy for lots of users and small devices.

But I guess that intellectual honesty has never been your goal here

Huh


edit:
are you on drugs ?

Fixed. Troll.
really ?
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July 29, 2015, 09:52:57 PM
 #29516


Now its Frap.doc's turn to get rekt:

Piling every proof-of-work quorum system in the world into one dataset doesn't scale.

Bitcoin users might get increasingly tyrannical about limiting the size of the chain so it's easy for lots of users and small devices.


 Cheesy

You should keep in mind this while posting.

Maybe then you would take a full quote of a post, instead of just extracting a part out of its context in order to prove your point.

BitDNS users might be completely liberal about adding any large data features since relatively few domain registrars are needed, while Bitcoin users might get increasingly tyrannical about limiting the size of the chain so it's easy for lots of users and small devices.

But I guess that intellectual honesty has never been your goal here

"Extracting?"  What an interesting word choice.   Roll Eyes

You make it sound like I put Satoshi's quote through some kind of violent mechanical processing, instead of the commonplace practice of editing for clarity and brevity.  But we all understand your goal here is to impute and exaggerate my intellectual dishonesty, in order to distract from the larger issue of why Team Gavinista is losing the Bitcoin Civil War.

The BitDNS discussion was not germane and thus excluded.  A link to the full text of the primary source was provided.

The difference between bad and well-developed digital cash will determine whether we have a dictatorship or a real democracy.  David Chaum 1996
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Blocksize is an intentionally limited resource, like the 21e6 BTC limit.  Changing it degrades the surrounding economics, creating negative incentives.  Jeff Garzik 2013


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It is an Engineering Requirement that Bitcoin be “Above the Law”  Paul Sztorc 2015
Resiliency, not efficiency, is the paramount goal of decentralized, non-state sanctioned currency -Jon Matonis 2015

Bitcoin is intentionally designed to be ungovernable and governance-free.  luke-jr 2016

Technology tends to move in the direction of making surveillance easier, and the ability of computers to track us doubles every eighteen months. - Phil Zimmerman 2013

The only way to make software secure, reliable, and fast is to make it small. Fight Features. - Andy Tanenbaum 2004
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July 29, 2015, 10:01:14 PM
 #29517

Quote
Quote
how does it not correlate with my theory?  yours is just a long term zoom out of the hashrate which obscures the shorter effect of the stress test.

I think, everybody can see that the hashrate is growing. No matter if there is "stress test" or not.

And it is obvious that bitcoin price was $318 during the time you took days off.

Haha Odalv:


You should keep in mind this while posting.

Maybe then you would take a full quote of a post, instead of just extracting a part out of its context in order to prove your point.

BitDNS users might be completely liberal about adding any large data features since relatively few domain registrars are needed, while Bitcoin users might get increasingly tyrannical about limiting the size of the chain so it's easy for lots of users and small devices.

But I guess that intellectual honesty has never been your goal here

Huh


edit:
are you on drugs ?

Fixed. Troll.

Do you pay shills ? Adrian-x and Rocks looks like children who can enjoy wooden toy train.
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July 29, 2015, 10:01:29 PM
 #29518

Gmax finally getting the treatment he deserves:

http://www.reddit.com/r/Bitcoin/comments/3f26b7/thank_you_mike_hearn_for_sticking_up_for_us_this/
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July 29, 2015, 10:06:21 PM
 #29519

It's coming soon:

https://github.com/bitcoinxt/bitcoinxt/pull/22
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July 29, 2015, 10:08:59 PM
 #29520


Extremely good reply, that is exactly my thinking when it comes to the blocksize debate.

The best quote imho:

Quote
If Satoshi had said from the start,

"Bitcoin cannot ever scale. So I intend it to be heavily limited and used only by a handful of people for rare transactions. I picked 1mb as an arbitrary limit to ensure it never gets popular."

... then I'd have not bothered getting involved. I'd have said, huh, I don't really feel like putting effort into a system that is intended to NOT be popular. And so would many other people.
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